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A history of pediatric hematology/oncology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226613
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1991 Apr-Jun;8(2):iii-viii
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Zipursky
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1991 Apr-Jun;8(2):iii-viii
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Hematology - history
History, 20th Century
Hospitals - history
Humans
Medical Oncology - history
Pediatrics - history
Research - history
Abstract
In summary, the history of hematology/oncology in Canada is a varied one. Beginning in 1945 in hematology, it has gradually expanded to include oncology. The growth of this specialty has provided a high standard of medical care and free services to afflicted children and their families. A substantial amount of basic and clinical research is carried out in this field. A great deal of work remains to be done in Canada, as elsewhere, if the needs of all patients are to be met and the diseases afflicting them are to be adequately studied.
PubMed ID
1863538 View in PubMed
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Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1992 Apr-Jun;9(2):139-49
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Zipursky
A. Poon
J. Doyle
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1992 Apr-Jun;9(2):139-49
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Down Syndrome - complications - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - pathology
Humans
Hydrops Fetalis - complications - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Megakaryocytes
Neoplastic Stem Cells - pathology
Nondisjunction, Genetic
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Preleukemia - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
The incidence of leukemia is higher in children with Down syndrome (DS) than in normals. In approximately 50% of cases the type of leukemia is acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) and it occurs during the first 4 years of life. The leukemic cell also has features of erythroid progenitors and therefore appears to be a precursor cell with biphenotypic properties. In addition, newborns with DS frequently develop transient leukemia (TL), which is characterized by the presence of megakaryoblasts in the blood which disappear during the first 1-3 months of life. The incidence of this disorder is unknown although preliminary studies suggest that megakaryoblasts may be found frequently in the blood of DS newborns. TL does not occur in normal newborn infants. Although TL disappears spontaneously, many of these children will develop AMKL at 1-4 years of age. Recent surveys suggest that 20-30% of newborns with TL will develop AMKL. Preliminary evidence suggests that TL is a clonal proliferation, can be fatal, and may occur in a specific subgroup of DS children. The observations in this report are drawn from our own experience, reports in the literature, and data accumulated in the Canadian Down Syndrome Leukemia Registry.
PubMed ID
1388043 View in PubMed
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Megakaryoblastic leukemia and Down's syndrome: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236073
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1987;4(3):211-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Zipursky
M. Peeters
A. Poon
Author Affiliation
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1987;4(3):211-30
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Disease Susceptibility
Down Syndrome - complications - genetics
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mosaicism
Remission, Spontaneous
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Megakaryoblastic leukemia and transient leukemia in Down's syndrome have been reviewed using case reports from the literature and our own experience at the Hospital for Sick Children. The following conclusions have been reached: (1) approximately 20% of leukemia (excluding transient leukemia) in Down's syndrome is acute megakaryoblastic leukemia; (2) approximately 20% of all leukemia in Down's syndrome is transient leukemia; (3) transient leukemia in Down's syndrome is acute megakaryoblastic leukemia; (4) recurrence of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia occurs in 20% of the cases of transient leukemia; and (5) the incidence of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in Down's syndrome is estimated to be 400 times that in normal children. These observations suggest that a specific form of leukemia, namely acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, has a remarkable association with Down's syndrome.
PubMed ID
2978961 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.