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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
M S Huuskonen
A. Karjalainen
A. Tossavainen
J. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupations
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Primary prevention carried out today can reduce the disease incidence in the future decades. The present disease panorama is the consequence of past asbestos exposure mainly before the 1970s. The peak incidence of asbestos-induced diseases will be reached around 2010 in Finland. The number of asbestos-related premature deaths is at present annually about 150 which exceeds the figure of fatal work accidents. Asbestos-related cancer will increase still for 15-20 years and reach its maximum, about 300 cases, in 2010, and will start to decrease after that. More than 20,000 asbestos-exposed workers have participated in the medical screening and follow-up. The termination of exposure, antismoking campaigns, improved diagnostics and careful attention to compensation issues, as well as other potentials for prevention, were the central issue of the Asbestos Program of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. An important objective of research work is to improve early diagnostics, and thereby treatment prospects, in case of asbestos-induced cancers.
PubMed ID
8684292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asbestos exposure according to different exposure indices among Finnish lung cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222346
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1993;65(4):269-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
S. Vilkman
A. Lahdensuo
J. Mattila
A. Tossavainen
T. Tuomi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Disease, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1993;65(4):269-74
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Asbestosis - etiology - pathology - surgery
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - pathology - surgery
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - pathology - surgery
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Smoking - adverse effects - pathology
Abstract
During a 6-month period all lung cancer patients in a university hospital chest clinic were investigated for asbestos exposure by means of personal interview, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), roentgenograms, lung function testing, histology and measurement of fibre concentrations in lung tissue samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). About one-third of the patients (33%) were classified as having been exposed to asbestos on the basis of the interview. BAL was performed and AB counts were done in 51 patients. Fourteen (27%) BAL specimens had AB counts of 1 or more AB/ml, which is the conventional limit for non-trivial asbestos exposure. For a subgroup of 25 operated lung cancer patients fibre analysis was also available. In six cases (30%) the asbestos-containing samples had asbestos fibre concentrations equal to or more than 1 million fibres/g dry lung. In eight (32%) of the operated lung cancer patients histopathologically confirmed fibrosis was seen; five of these patients were in the two highest exposure classes. Pleural plaques on X-ray films were seen in six (24%) of the operated cases. With each indicator of exposure about 30% of lung cancer patients were found to have been exposed, confirming the "one-third rule"; however, when all the information was collated there were three cases (12%) in which exposure was most obvious according to the different parameters used in this study. In these three cases the cancer could well be attributed to asbestos. Anthophyllite was present in all asbestos-containing samples and anthophyllite was the main fibre type in 61% of these samples.
PubMed ID
8144239 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asbestos exposure and pulmonary fiber concentrations of 300 Finnish urban men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218962
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
E. Vanhala
P J Karhunen
K. Lalu
A. Penttilä
A. Tossavainen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - isolation & purification
Asbestosis - mortality - pathology
Cause of Death
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the pulmonary concentrations of mineral fibers in the Finnish male urban population and to evaluate the analysis of pulmonary fiber burden by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as an indicator of past fiber exposure.
The pulmonary concentration of mineral fibers was determined by SEM and compared with occupational history for a series of 300 autopsies of urban men aged 33 to 69 years.
The concentration of fibers (f) longer than 1 micron ranged from
PubMed ID
8016597 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1976;2 Suppl 1:37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
M. Virtamo
A. Tossavainen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1976;2 Suppl 1:37-41
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Copper
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Iron
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Metallurgy
Smoking
Steel
Abstract
The concentration of carbon monoxide in the air of 67 iron, steel, or copper alloy foundries using sand molding was measured. About 1,100 carbon monoxide determinations were made. High concentrations of carbon monoxide were found in the area around the cupolas and the casting sites in iron foundries. The blood carboxyhemoglobin levels of 145 workers from iron foundries were measured. The carboxyhemoglobin level of 6% was exceeded in 26% of the nonsmokers and in 71% of the smokers.
PubMed ID
968463 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chest CT screening of asbestos-exposed workers: lung lesions and incidental findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166974
Source
Eur Respir J. 2007 Jan;29(1):78-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
T. Vierikko
R. Järvenpää
T. Autti
P. Oksa
M. Huuskonen
S. Kaleva
J. Laurikka
S. Kajander
K. Paakkola
S. Saarelainen
E-R Salomaa
A. Tossavainen
P. Tukiainen
J. Uitti
T. Vehmas
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. tuula.vierikko@fimnet.fi
Source
Eur Respir J. 2007 Jan;29(1):78-84
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidental Findings
Lung Diseases - etiology - radiography
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - radiography
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pleural Diseases - etiology - radiography
Smoking - adverse effects
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The objective of the present study is to determine the feasibility of chest computed tomography (CT) in screening for lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers. In total, 633 workers were included in the present study and were examined with chest radiography and high-resolution CT (HRCT). A total of 180 current and ex-smokers (cessation within the previous 10 yrs) were also screened with spiral CT. Noncalcified lung nodules were considered positive findings. The incidental CT findings not related to asbestos exposure were registered and further examined when needed. Noncalcified lung nodules were detected in 86 workers. Five histologically confirmed lung cancers were found. Only one of the five cancers was also detected by plain chest radiography and three were from the group of patients with a pre-estimated lower cancer probability. Two lung cancers were stage Ia and were radically operated. In total, 277 individuals presented 343 incidental findings of which 46 required further examination. Four of these were regarded as clinically important. In conclusion, computed tomography and high-resolution computed tomography proved to be superior to plain radiography in detecting lung cancer in asbestos-exposed workers with many confounding chest findings. The numerous incidental findings are a major concern for future screenings, which should be considered for asbestos-exposed ex-smokers and current smokers.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2007 Jan;29(1):6-717197479
PubMed ID
17050560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Computed tomography of asbestos-related pleural abnormalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190429
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2002 Apr;75(4):224-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
M. Tiitola
L. Kivisaari
A. Zitting
M S Huuskonen
S. Kaleva
A. Tossavainen
T. Vehmas
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsiniki, Finland. mia.tiitola@occuphealth.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2002 Apr;75(4):224-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - complications - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Construction Materials
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Pleural Diseases - etiology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
To study the observer agreement in several asbestos-related pleural abnormalities and to define criteria to discriminate between pleural changes in workers with occupational disease, and those in controls.
Pleural abnormalities in spiral computed tomography of 602 construction workers with asbestosis or bilateral pleural plaques and 49 controls were reviewed by three radiologists using structured forms.
Intra- and inter-observer agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.4 or better with regard to the calcification, extent and thickness of pleural disease. These factors all correlated positively with the duration of asbestos exposure. There were significant differences in these pleural changes between the workers (mean extent per side 83 cm(2)) and controls (mean extent per side 40 cm(2)). Of the controls, 84% showed pleural lesions with an estimated extent of 10 cm(2) or more, bilateral in 64%. The extent of 45 cm(2) in pleural disease was the best value for discriminating between the controls and diseased workers, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 66%. The degree of pleural calcification, however, was the best discriminator between these groups, but quantitative methods are necessary for its use in the diagnostics of individuals.
The extent, calcification and thickness were well-repeatable indicators of benign pleural pathology and thus their use in future classification systems in computed tomography is recommended. In our material, the extent of 45 cm(2) and the degree of calcification were helpful in discriminating between pleural changes in workers with occupational disease, and those in controls who also presented marked pleural pathology.
PubMed ID
11981655 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Evaluation of the mineral fibers content of pulmonary tissue in people engaged in extraction and concentration of chrysotile asbestos and in those living near enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195172
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(11):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
E B Kovalevskii
A. Tossavainen
T. Tuomi
E. Vankhala
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(11):13-9
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Industry
Lung - chemistry - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - analysis
Mining
Residence Characteristics
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors determined concentration of asbestos fibers in lung tissue samples obtained in hospital of Asbestos town in Sverdlovsk region. The samples were taken from 47 individuals who died with various causes. of Workers engaged into extraction and beneficiation of chrysotile asbestos at Bazhenovsky field, into production of chrysotile asbestos goods and those who reside in close proximity to the enterprises demonstrated no differences in general content of fibrous particles and of chrysotile asbestos fibers in lung tissue, if compared to workers of the same enterprises and industrial regions dwellers of Canada (being second, after Russia, for total chrysotile asbestos production). The study proved concentrations of amphibole asbestos fibers to be one order lower than those in Canada.
PubMed ID
11280277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to neurotoxic agents in Finnish working environments. Trends and assessment of exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243777
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1982;92:37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
J. Järvisalo
A. Tossavainen
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1982;92:37-45
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Monitoring, Physiologic
Neurotoxins
Occupational Medicine - trends
Abstract
The article reviews the current condition of exposure to neurotoxic agents in working environments in Finland. The role of measurements of ambient air concentrations and biological monitoring in the assessment of exposure levels is also briefly discussed. The results are needed in order to assess the exposure of workers who apparently have neurological disorders of occupational origin or of workers subject to health examinations because of exposure to neurotoxic agents. Such results are often lacking, and the assessment must be based on information received from the exposed workers themselves and from the employer. In deciding on the possible occupational origin of a neurological disease account must also be taken of the exposure-related symptoms of the worker, any other diseases and any physiological factors that may lead to increased susceptibility of the worker to toxic agents.
PubMed ID
6962655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to soluble nickel in electrolytic nickel refining.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208839
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Apr;41(2):167-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
M. Kiilunen
J. Utela
T. Rantanen
H. Norppa
A. Tossavainen
M. Koponen
H. Paakkulainen
A. Aitio
Author Affiliation
Biomonitoring Laboratory, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Apr;41(2):167-88
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Electroplating
Finland
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Micronuclei, Chromosome-Defective
Mouth Mucosa - chemistry
Nickel - analysis - urine
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Protective Devices
Abstract
Past and present exposure to nickel was studied in an electrolytic nickel refinery, where an increased incidence of nasal cancer had been reported, using nickel analyses in air, blood and urine. Genotoxic effects were studied using analysis of micronuclei from acridine orange-stained smears from the buccal mucosa of the workers. Workers used respirators or masks in tasks where the exposure was expected to be high. Inside the mask, nickel concentrations were 0.9-2.4 micrograms m-3 in such tasks. In those tasks where masks were not used, nickel concentrations in the breathing zone were 1.3-21 micrograms m-3. Air-borne nickel concentrations (stationary sampling) varied between 230 and 800 micrograms m-3 in 1966-1988 with no systematic change; thereafter lower concentrations (170-460 micrograms m-3) have been observed. After-shift urinary concentrations of nickel were 0.1-2 mumol l-1; they showed no correlation with nickel concentrations in the air. Concentrations of nickel in the urine were still elevated after a 2-4 week vacation. The frequency of micronucleated epithelial cells in the buccal mucosa of nickel refinery workers was not significantly elevated by comparison with referents. No relationship was observed between micronucleus frequencies and levels of nickel in air, urine or blood.
PubMed ID
9155238 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.