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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Reflections concerning the management of suicidal behavior in a mental health centre setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251748
Source
Can Ment Health. 1975 Dec;23(4):11-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1975
Author
A. Russell
Source
Can Ment Health. 1975 Dec;23(4):11-3
Date
Dec-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Mental health services
Ontario
Regional Medical Programs
Suicide - prevention & control
PubMed ID
10236896 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reflections on the current psychiatric consultation and referral pattern and on the state of the art, at Oxford Regional Centre, an adult mental retardation facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240479
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Jun;29(4):306-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
A. Russell
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Jun;29(4):306-11
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychiatry
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This paper investigates the utilization pattern of the psychiatric consultation and referral service provided by the author in an Adult Mental Retardation Facility over a three-year period. The services, their history and locale are described against a background of changes in attitudes towards the problems of the retarded. Rising interest by psychiatrists in the field is placed in context. A spectrum of variables is used for a statistical analysis of factors (Chi2) influencing psychiatric referrals or non-referrals of all new admissions over the period indicated (N = 98). Against a background of increasing normalization and de-institutionalization, the character and composition of the shrinking institutional population has changed. Administration and direct-care staff are now confronted with management and care problems of lower functioning retardates, presenting difficult-to-manage behaviours and severe, often multiple, handicaps. Several factors with resource and care implications are considered, affecting institutionalized as well as community placed retardates, especially in hard economic times. Findings are discussed; recommendations are made concerning the application of scarce psychiatric resources to meet changing psychiatric needs of the population, maximize services and continue community directed normalization efforts. Some caveats are sounded and further research suggested.
PubMed ID
6145517 View in PubMed
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Experience with the first 200 allogeneic blood cell transplants (BCT) in Calgary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198516
Source
Przegl Lek. 2000;57 Suppl 1:27-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
J A Russell
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Przegl Lek. 2000;57 Suppl 1:27-9
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - methods
Humans
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - surgery
Leukemia, Myeloid - surgery
Abstract
Allogenic peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (BCT, allo-PBSCT) have an established place in currently active protocols at the University of Calgary, we now use BCT as the third approach for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR). For chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) beyond first chronic phase (CP) and other hematological malignancies BCT gives outcomes at least equivalent to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). BCT recipients benefit from faster engraftment. However a tendency to develop more graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is observed. Bone marrow is still the preferred source of stem cells for CML in first CP and for patients with non-malignant disorders. The ability to obtain high number of blood cells allows us to be able to perform haptoidentical transplants using T-cell depletion and to obtain engraftment in most cases. Refining tha latter technique however remains a challenge particularly with respect to immune reconstitution.
PubMed ID
10822992 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Mar;28(3):675; author reply 675-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
R. Ferrari
A. Russell
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Mar;28(3):675; author reply 675-8
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Fibromyalgia
Humans
Liability, Legal
Saskatchewan
PubMed ID
11296982 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of Hirschsprung's disease and additional anomalies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35952
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Jan;83(1):68-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
M B Russell
C A Russell
E. Niebuhr
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Jan;83(1):68-71
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Adolescent
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hirschsprung Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The incidence of Hirschsprung's disease was studied in approximately 1.5 million consecutive live births in Denmark by hospital records. A diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease required a histologic verified absence of ganglion cells in either biopsy or surgical colonic specimens. The incidence of Hirschsprung's disease was found to be 0.140 per 1000 live births (1:7,165) with a male: female ratio of 4.1:1 in short segment, and 2.4:1 in long segment Hirschsprung's disease (p = 0.36). Maternal age and birth order were unimportant factors. The association of Hirschsprung's disease and Down's syndrome was seen in 9 of the 207 patients and may represent a real association, whereas the association with congenital heart defects seen in 2% (not including patients with Down's syndrome) is more doubtful. A mortality of 16% among the patients with Hirschsprung's disease emphasizes the extreme importance of early diagnosis.
PubMed ID
8193476 View in PubMed
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Polymorphisms in CD14, mannose-binding lectin, and Toll-like receptor-2 are associated with increased prevalence of infection in critically ill adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175846
Source
Crit Care Med. 2005 Mar;33(3):638-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Ainsley M Sutherland
Keith R Walley
James A Russell
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia Critical Care Research Laboratories, James Hogg iCAPTURE Centre/St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2005 Mar;33(3):638-44
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, CD14 - genetics
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Innate - genetics
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectin - genetics
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Cell Surface - genetics
Risk
Survival Analysis
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - mortality
Toll-Like Receptor 2
Toll-Like Receptors
Abstract
To test for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the innate immunity receptors cluster of differentiation (CD)-14, mannose-binding lectin, and Toll-like receptor-2 with clinical phenotype in critically ill patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.
Genetic association study.
Tertiary care mixed medical-surgery intensive care unit at St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, a teaching hospital associated with the University of British Columbia.
A cohort of 252 critically ill Caucasians with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.
DNA was extracted from discarded blood. Clinical data were gathered by retrospective chart review.
C-159T CD14, the X/Y and B, C, and D polymorphisms of mannose-binding lectin, and T-16933A Toll-like receptor-2 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We tested for association of genotype with prevalence of positive bacterial cultures, type of organism (Gram-positive, Gram-negative, other), sepsis and septic shock at admission to the intensive care unit, and 28-day survival. CD14 -159TT was associated with increased prevalence of positive bacterial cultures and with Gram-negative bacteria. Mannose-binding lectin haplotype pairs XO/O and O/O were also associated with increased prevalence of positive bacterial cultures but not with a specific organism class. Toll-like receptor-2 -16933AA was associated with increased prevalence of sepsis and with Gram-positive bacteria. In contrast, the polymorphisms were not associated with increased prevalence of septic shock or altered 28-day survival.
Single nucleotide polymorphisms in CD14, mannose-binding lectin, and Toll-like receptor-2 are associated with increased prevalence of positive bacterial cultures and sepsis but not with altered prevalence of septic shock or decreased 28-day survival. Furthermore, CD14 single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with Gram-negative bacteria and Toll-like receptor-2 with Gram-positive bacteria, whereas mannose-binding lectin was not associated with a particular organism class. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms in innate immunity receptors may alter recognition and clearance of bacteria without changing outcomes of critically ill adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2005 Mar;33(3):695-615753780
PubMed ID
15753758 View in PubMed
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Nicotine intake and dependence in Swedish snuff takers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67840
Source
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1992;108(4):507-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
H. Holm
M J Jarvis
M A Russell
C. Feyerabend
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1992;108(4):507-11
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Nicotine - blood - pharmacology
Plants, Toxic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - blood
Sweden
Tobacco Use Disorder - blood - physiopathology
Tobacco, Smokeless - pharmacology
Abstract
Two studies examining nicotine intake in users of Swedish moist oral snuff are reported. Absorption form a single pinch (2 g) in ten users after overnight abstinence was fairly rapid. The increment in plasma nicotine concentrations averaged 9.9 ng/ml (SD 6.5) after 10 min and peaked at 14.5 ng/ml (SD 4.6) shortly after discarding at 30 min. Among groups of habitual snuff takers (n = 27) and cigarette smokers (n = 35) studied on a day of normal snuffing/smoking, peak blood nicotine levels after use were similar [averaging 36.6 ng/ml (SD 14.4) and 36.7 ng/ml (SD 16.1), respectively], but there was a tendency to higher cotinine levels in the snuffers (399.2 ng/ml versus 306.3 ng/ml). The snuff takers and cigarette smokers reported similar levels of subjective dependence on tobacco. Epidemiological study of Swedish snuff users could clarify whether the cardiovascular risks of tobacco are attributable to nicotine or to other smoke components, as in their case nicotine intake is not accompanied by combustion products.
PubMed ID
1410167 View in PubMed
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Familial occurrence of Hirschsprung's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218243
Source
Clin Genet. 1994 May;45(5):231-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
M B Russell
C A Russell
K. Fenger
E. Niebuhr
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Genet. 1994 May;45(5):231-5
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Hirschsprung Disease - genetics
Humans
Male
Pedigree
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We assessed the familial occurrence of Hirschsprung's disease from 224 probands born in Denmark after 1959. Probands who were still alive received a mailed questionnaire, and medical reports for the probands and their relatives with suspected Hirschsprung's disease were examined. The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease required a histologically verified biopsy or surgical colonic specimens, and exclusion of a secondary causes for Hirschsprung's disease. Familial occurrence was seen in 11 families. Ten first-degree, two third-degree and one fifth-degree relatives had Hirschsprung's disease. Both short segment agangliosis (the sigmoid colon or below) and long segment agangliosis (above the sigmoid colon) occurred in five of the 11 families, implying that the etiology of Hirschsprung's disease with short and long segment agangliosis is the same. Compared with the general population, the first-degree relatives of the 224 probands had a minimum of a 93-fold increased risk of Hirschsprung's disease. This strongly suggests that genetic factors play a role in Hirschsprung's disease.
PubMed ID
8076407 View in PubMed
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A population-based evaluation of antenatal diagnosis of orofacial clefts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158317
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2008 Mar;45(2):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Kathleen A Russell
Victoria M Allen
Mary E MacDonald
Kirsten Smith
Linda Dodds
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University and IWK Health Centre, 5981 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Kathy.Russell@Dal.ca
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2008 Mar;45(2):148-53
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Chromosome Aberrations - statistics & numerical data
Cleft Lip - epidemiology
Cleft Palate - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Fetal Diseases - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Live Birth - epidemiology
Maternal Age
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Parity
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the changes in prevalence and antenatal detection of cleft lip with or without cleft palate and isolated cleft palate and to describe the association between anomalies and rates of antenatal diagnosis in Nova Scotia from 1992 to 2002.
This population-based cohort study employed the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, the Fetal Anomaly Database, and IWK Cleft Palate Database in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Cleft type, mode of diagnosis, and associated abnormalities of orofacial clefts for liveborn infants, stillbirths, and second trimester terminations of pregnancy between 1992 and 2002 were determined.
There were 225 fetuses identified as having orofacial clefts. The overall prevalence of clefts was 2.1 in 1000 live births, and this prevalence did not change with time. The overall antenatal detection of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was 23%; however, there was improvement in detection of cleft lip with or without cleft palate from the years 1992 to 1996 (14%) to the years 1997 to 2002 (30%, p = .02). No isolated cleft palates were detected antenatally. Associated structural anomalies were seen in 34.2% of cases with orofacial clefts, and chromosomal abnormalities were associated with 9.8%.
The prevalence of orofacial clefts in Nova Scotia has not changed from 1992 to 2002. The proportion of antenatally diagnosed cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Nova Scotia is consistent with rates reported in the literature and has increased from 1992 to 2002.
PubMed ID
18333649 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.