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[Changes in the smoking habits of Danes in the period 1970-1987]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67976
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Sep 19;150(38):2229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-1988

No association between adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and cardiovascular disease amongst Swedish women: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269549
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):531-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
N. Roswall
S. Sandin
R. Scragg
M. Löf
G. Skeie
A. Olsen
H-O Adami
E. Weiderpass
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):531-41
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In several intervention trials, a healthy Nordic diet showed beneficial effects on markers of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between a healthy Nordic diet and clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.
Our aim was first to examine the association between a healthy Nordic food index (wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish) and the incidence of overall cardiovascular disease (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, arrhythmia, thrombosis and hypertensive disease), and secondly to test for possible effect modification by smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption and age.
We conducted an analysis of data from the prospective Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 43 310 women who completed a food frequency questionnaire in 1991-1992, and followed up until 31 December 2012 through Swedish registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models.
During follow-up, 8383 women developed cardiovascular disease. We found no association between the healthy Nordic food index and overall cardiovascular disease risk or any of the subgroups investigated. There was a statistically significant interaction with smoking status (P = 0.02), with a beneficial effect only amongst former smokers (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.99 per 1-point increment).
The present results do not support an association between a healthy Nordic food index and risk of cardiovascular disease in Swedish women. There was also no effect modification by alcohol intake, BMI or age. Our finding of an interaction with smoking status requires reproduction.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):542-426250841
PubMed ID
25991078 View in PubMed
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Sex research in Denmark--a comparison between 5 sexuological surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66819
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1968;203:247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Time preferences for health gains: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73287
Source
Health Econ. 1993 Oct;2(3):257-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
J A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Health Econ. 1993 Oct;2(3):257-65
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Educational Status
Female
Forecasting
Health Priorities
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Humans
Life Support Care
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Program Evaluation - economics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Value of Life
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to elicit the implied discount rates to be used in economic evaluations of health care programmes. The paper presents results from two Norwegian surveys in which a random sample of the population and a sample of health planners were asked to prioritise between alternative health care programmes, and make trade-offs between future health gains and more immediate gains. The questionnaire had four hypothetical choice situations; two for life saving and two for health improvement.
PubMed ID
8275171 View in PubMed
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