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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Latvia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49223
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Feb;60(2):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
V. Mavtchoutko
S. Vene
M. Haglund
M. Forsgren
A. Duks
V. Kalnina
J. Hörling
A. Lundkvist
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Health Centre, Riga, Latvia.
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Feb;60(2):216-22
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Arvicolinae
Brain - virology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - virology
Female
Humans
Latvia
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - analysis
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Alignment
Serologic Tests
Vero Cells
Viral Envelope Proteins - analysis - genetics - immunology
Virulence
Abstract
Viruses of the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) antigenic complex, within the family Flaviviridae, cause a variety of diseases including uncomplicated febrile illness, encephalitis, meningo-encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever and chronic disease in humans, domesticated animals or wildlife species. TBE is a serious problem in Latvia with up to a 1,000 patients confirmed serologically annually 1994-1995. No previous data had been reported on the causative agent of TBE in Latvia. In the present study, a virus was isolated from serum of a patient with clinical symptoms of an acute TBE infection. Nucleotide sequence information obtained by direct reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the serological characteristics of the isolated virus strain, designated TBE-Latvia-1-96, indicated a closer relationship to the Vasilchenko strain, isolated in Novosibirsk (Siberia, Russia), as compared to the western European or far eastern subtypes of TBE viruses. In a mouse neurovirulence assay, a significant difference in survival rates (days) was shown between Latvia-1-96 and the western European TBE virus subtype.
PubMed ID
10596024 View in PubMed
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Detection and subsequent sequencing of Puumala virus from human specimens by PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215946
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Feb;33(2):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
J. Hörling
A. Lundkvist
K. Persson
M. Mullaart
T. Dzagurova
A. Dekonenko
E. Tkachenko
B. Niklasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Defense Microbiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Feb;33(2):277-82
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Viral - isolation & purification
Base Sequence
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Viral - genetics
Europe
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hantavirus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Hantavirus Infections - immunology - virology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - statistics & numerical data
RNA, Viral - genetics - isolation & purification
Russia
Sensitivity and specificity
Species Specificity
Sweden
Abstract
A sensitive method based on PCR was developed for the detection of Puumala virus (PUU) in human samples. The assay was found to be specific for PUU-like strains and distinguished between these and hantaviruses of other serotypes. The detection limit was found to be 10(-5) focus-forming units. Clinical samples were collected from patients with nephropathia epidemica in Sweden and western Russia. Five whole blood samples collected from patients in Russia with the acute phase of disease were found to be positive by the PCR. All samples were negative for PUU antigen when examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Virus isolation on Vero E6 cells from several of the acute-phase samples, including the 5 PCR-positive samples, was not successful. The amplified samples were subjected to direct nucleic acid sequencing for confirmation of identity. The sequences differed from each other and were closely related to the Russian bank vole isolate CG-1820, thereby indicating the origin of nephropathia epidemica. The PCR was used for amplification and subsequent nucleotide sequencing of eight PUU-like isolates with different geographic origins. The Swedish strains were more closely related to the Finnish PUU prototype strain, Sotkamo, than to the Russian isolates. Interestingly, a Belgian isolate, CG-13891, differed markedly from all other PUU strains.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7714178 View in PubMed
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Expansion of spatial and host range of Puumala virus in Sweden: an increasing threat for humans?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283488
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Jun;145(8):1642-1648
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
O. Borg
M. Wille
P. Kjellander
U A Bergvall
P-E Lindgren
J. Chirico
Å. Lundkvist
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Jun;145(8):1642-1648
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Geography
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Host Specificity
Prevalence
Puumala virus - physiology
Rodentia
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Hantaviruses are globally distributed and cause severe human disease. Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is the most common species in Northern Europe, and the only hantavirus confirmed to circulate in Sweden, restricted to the northern regions of the country. In this study, we aimed to further add to the natural ecology of PUUV in Sweden by investigating prevalence, and spatial and host species infection patterns. Specifically, we wanted to ascertain whether PUUV was present in the natural reservoir, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) further south than Dalälven river, in south-central Sweden, and whether PUUV can be detected in other rodent species in addition to the natural reservoir. In total, 559 animals were collected at Grimsö (59°43'N; 15°28'E), Sala (59°55'N; 16°36'E) and Bogesund (59°24'N; 18°14'E) in south-central Sweden between May 2013 and November 2014. PUUV ELISA-reactive antibodies were found both in 2013 (22/295) and in 2014 (18/264), and nine samples were confirmed as PUUV-specific by focus reduction neutralization test. Most of the PUUV-specific samples were from the natural host, the bank vole, but also from other rodent hosts, indicating viral spill-over. Finally, we showed that PUUV is present in more highly populated central Sweden.
PubMed ID
28249631 View in PubMed
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["Four corners disease"--a newly discovered virus in the USA. Is there a similar disease in Sweden?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218825
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Feb 16;91(7):581-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-1994

Temporal dynamics of Puumala virus antibody prevalence in voles and of nephropathia epidemica incidence in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214604
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1995 Aug;53(2):134-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
B. Niklasson
B. Hornfeldt
A. Lundkvist
S. Bjorsten
J. Leduc
Author Affiliation
Department of Defense Microbiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm.
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1995 Aug;53(2):134-40
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Arvicolinae - virology
Body Weight
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Hantavirus - immunology
Hantavirus Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Prevalence
Rodent Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Puumala (PUU) virus is the etiologic agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE) in humans. This disease is highly endemic in Vasterbotten county, Sweden, with an annual incidence of 19.2 (range 3.7-37.4) per 100,000 inhabitants. Voles are considered to be both the main reservoir and the vector of PUU virus. A total of 3,591 rodents (mainly Clethrionomys glareolus, C. rufocanus, and Microtus agrestis) trapped in Vasterbotten between 1979 and 1987 were tested for the presence of PUU virus antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The predominant species, C. glareolus (71% [2,544 of 3,591]), also had the highest antibody prevalence (19% [483 of 2,544]). In C. glareolus, the antibody prevalence rate increased with weight (age), reaching more than 50% in the heaviest weight group, and suggesting that horizontal infection may be important. The highest frequency (25%) of antibody-positive C. rufocanus was also found in the highest weight groups. Microtus agrestis showed low absolute numbers and a low antibody prevalence rate (5%). In C. glareolus, both antibody prevalence and weight were recurrently higher in the spring than in the previous fall. The antibody prevalence rate in spring was positively correlated with the vole density in the previous fall and spring. The fall antibody prevalence rate was directly dependent on C. glareolus density. The incidence of human NE in the fall was dependent on the concurrent density of C. glareolus, whereas the incidence of NE in the spring was dependent on vole density the previous fall.
PubMed ID
7677213 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.