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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Complications after hysterectomy. A Danish population based study 1978-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23911
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Oct;72(7):570-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
T F Andersen
A. Loft
H. Brønnum-Hansen
C. Roepstorff
M. Madsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Oct;72(7):570-7
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects
Hysterectomy, Vaginal - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We studied complications after hysterectomy among all women in the Danish population who had a simple hysterectomy in the period 1978-81 based on data obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry. Among patients, with neither diagnosed cancer nor major co-surgery (n = 23,386), we identified all the complications which occurred during hospital admission from the time of surgery up to six years from that point. Within 30 days of hysterectomy 2.6% of the patients had been diagnosed in hospitals as having complications according to our definition. The corresponding figures at 90 days and two years after the operation were 3.7% and 9.4%. The most frequently observed complications were post operative wound infections and bleeding, each affecting about 2% of all operated women. Logistic regression and Cox regression were used to identify prognostic indicators of readmission with complications. The probability of readmission with complications within six years after hysterectomy was estimated at 8% among low risk patients. The most pronounced increase in risk of readmission with complication occurred among women who had been admitted to psychiatric or somatic hospitals 0-12 months before they had their uterus removed (OR in the range 1.59 to 1.83). We discuss the prevailing difficulties of comparing observational evidence from different clinical settings reported in the literature, and emphasize the importance of developing a coordinated international strategy for non-experimental assessment of medical technology.
PubMed ID
8213107 View in PubMed
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Coping with regional variations: the case of surgery in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74027
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 1987 Oct-Dec;2(4):253-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
T F Andersen
R. Blais
J. Bredesen
T. Jørgensen
A. Loft
M. Madsen
G. Mooney
T. Sejr
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 1987 Oct-Dec;2(4):253-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholecystectomy - utilization
Data Collection
Denmark
Female
Health Services Misuse
Health status
Humans
Hysterectomy - utilization
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Population Dynamics
Prostatectomy - utilization
Questionnaires
Surgical Procedures, Operative - utilization
Abstract
This article examines some of the key research and policy issues that are emerging as a result of recent analyses of regional variations in health care. The article presents a historical background to this important new field of health services' research, and indicates, using some Danish examples of research on hysterectomy, cholecystectomy, and prostatectomy, the relevance of this research to management and policy planning. Regional variations are not yet fully explained in terms of what causes them. What is clear and what is the primary focus of this article is that their very existence, whatever their explanation, creates a major challenge for the management and planning of future health services.
PubMed ID
10318049 View in PubMed
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A Danish national cohort of 730 infants born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) 1994-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33222
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Aug;14(8):2143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A. Loft
K. Petersen
K. Erb
A L Mikkelsen
J. Grinsted
F. Hald
J. Hindkjaer
K M Nielsen
P. Lundstrom
A. Gabrielsen
S. Lenz
P. Hornnes
S. Ziebe
H B Ejdrup
A. Lindhard
Y. Zhou
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Aug;14(8):2143-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Insemination, Artificial
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This national cohort study included all clinical pregnancies obtained after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) registered in Denmark between January 1994 and July 1997 at five public and eight private fertility clinics. Laboratory and clinical data were obtained from the fertility clinics. The couples answered a questionnaire regarding the pregnancy and the health of the child (response rate 94%). Data validation was carried out through discharge charts. The mean age of the women was 32.1 years. In 84.2% of couples, male factor was the main reason for performing ICSI, and in 4.8% epididymal spermatozoa were used. The mean number of embryos replaced was 2.3 (range 1-3) and in 95% of cases fresh embryos were transferred. Only 183 women (28.5%) underwent prenatal diagnosis, resulting in 209 karyotypes with seven (3.3%) chromosome aberrations. Six major chromosomal abnormalities (2.9%) and one inherited structural chromosome aberration (0.5%) were found, but no sex chromosome aberrations. The frequency of multiple birth, Caesarean section rate, gestational age, preterm birth, and birth weight were comparable with previous studies. The perinatal mortality rate was 13.7 per 1000 children born with a gestational age of 24 weeks or more. In 2.2% (n = 16) of the liveborn infants, and in 2.7% (n = 20) of all infants, major birth defects were reported by the parents. Minor birth defects were found in nine liveborn infants (1.2%). In conclusion, the results of this study on outcome of ICSI pregnancies are in line with earlier reports, except that no sex chromosome abnormalities were found.
PubMed ID
10438441 View in PubMed
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Early postoperative mortality following cholecystectomy in the entire female population of Denmark, 1977-1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223854
Source
World J Surg. 1992 May-Jun;16(3):530-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Bredesen
T. Jørgensen
T F Andersen
H. Brønnum-Hansen
C. Roepstorff
M. Madsen
P. Wille-Jørgensen
A. Loft
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Gastroenterology F, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
World J Surg. 1992 May-Jun;16(3):530-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholecystectomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper assesses the risk of dying within 30 days of admission among 13,854 women who had a cholecystectomy performed as the principal operation from 1977 to 1981. The overall crude mortality rate was 1.2%. Women who had a simple elective cholecystectomy performed had a mortality rate similar to women who had a simple hysterectomy. The mortality was significantly higher than in the general female population (p less than 0.05). Increased age, acute admission, admissions to hospital within 3 months prior to the index admission, the number of discharge diagnoses, and the geographical region were significantly associated with increased mortality. Exploration of the common bile duct was associated with higher mortality in the bivariate analysis, but the association disappeared when the number of discharge diagnoses was taken into account. Type of hospital and the population based cholecystectomy rate of the patient's residential area was not associated with mortality. As regards early mortality, it is concluded that simple elective cholecystectomy is a safe procedure before the age of 50 to 60 years. Acute admissions and more than one diagnosis at discharge were associated with an increased mortality, whereas exploration of the common bile duct may not be as important an independent factor as previously assumed.
PubMed ID
1589992 View in PubMed
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Early postoperative mortality following hysterectomy. A Danish population based study, 1977-1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24908
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1991 Feb;98(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
A. Loft
T F Andersen
H. Brønnum-Hansen
C. Roepstorff
M. Madsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Copenhagen County Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1991 Feb;98(2):147-54
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - mortality
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The main objective of this cohort study was to analyse the early postoperative mortality after 'simple' hysterectomy for benign indications and to compare it with that of a randomly selected reference group of women matched for age. Registry data covering the entire Danish female population were used. Included in the study were all patients operated in the period 1977-1981. Patients were only included if no cancer was diagnosed and if no major co-surgery was performed (29,192 patients). Cancer patients were also excluded in the reference group (16,182 women). Mortality was studied according to characteristics of patients, their residential area, the surgical approach and operating hospital. Overall 47 patients died within 30 days of admission for hysterectomy (overall mortality 16.1 per 10,000). Only seven deaths were expected on the basis of the population sample, and adjusted for age, the relative risk (RR) for hysterectomy patients was 6.38 (95% CI 4.33-9.39). Early postoperative mortality increased with age, and the risk was elevated among emergency patients (RR = 3.22; 1.72-6.04). Patients with more than one diagnosis at discharge (RR = 4.53; 2.12-9.70) were at high risk, but early postoperative mortality was independent of surgical approach. Causes of death are discussed. Compared to the general population, patients who undergo 'simple' hysterectomy are faced with a sixfold risk of dying within 30 days, but a complete assessment of the risks and benefits of hysterectomy requires prospective studies of survival and morbidity, including quality of life for longer periods of time following operations.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Apr;99(4):350-11581286
PubMed ID
1822955 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Jan;77(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
A N Andersen
A. Loft
Author Affiliation
Fertility Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Jan;77(1):1-2
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - economics
Financing, Government
Financing, Personal
Finland
Humans
Iceland
Infertility - economics - therapy
Male
National Health Programs - economics
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques - economics
Scandinavia
Notes
Comment On: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Jan;77(1):63-79492721
PubMed ID
9492708 View in PubMed
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Impact of recombinant FSH dose adjustments on ovarian response in the second treatment cycle with IVF or ICSI in "standard" patients treated with 150 IU/day during the first cycle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63343
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):842-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
B. Popovic-Todorovic
A. Loft
S. Ziebe
A Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. drbiba@yahoo.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):842-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - drug effects - methods
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human - administration & dosage
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Maternal Age
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Oocytes - drug effects
Ovulation Induction - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Probability
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - drug effects - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A dose of 150 IU/day of recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) is commonly used as a "standard" dose for "standard" patients in the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment cycle. In the second cycle, the starting dose is adjusted in those patients who had an inappropriate response during the first cycle. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of dose adjustments on ovarian response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study including 567 first IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles using the long agonist protocol in "standard" patients. In the second cycle 385 patients who had failed to achieve an ongoing pregnancy were included. The starting dose in the second cycle was adjusted according to the response in the first cycle. RESULTS: A total of 215 patients (55.8%) had altered starting dose in the second cycle: 193 (50.1%) received >150 IU/day, whereas 22 (5.7%) had 150 IU/day, significantly more follicles (9.8 vs. 8.3, p = 0.002) and oocytes (8.4 vs. 6.7, p
PubMed ID
15315596 View in PubMed
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Incidence of ovarian cancer after hysterectomy: a nationwide controlled follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21877
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Nov;104(11):1296-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
A. Loft
O. Lidegaard
A. Tabor
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Nov;104(11):1296-301
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Ovariectomy - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of developing ovarian cancer after abdominal (total or subtotal) hysterectomy on benign indication. DESIGN: Prospective historical cohort study with 12.5 years of follow up. SETTING: Denmark, nationwide. POPULATION: All Danish women (aged 0 to 99 years) having undergone hysterectomy with conservation of at least one ovary for a benign indication from 1977 to 1981 (n = 22,135). Follow up was conducted from 1977 to 1991. The reference group included all Danish women who had not undergone hysterectomy, age-standardised according to the hysterectomy group (n = 2,554,872). METHODS: Registry data derived from the Danish National Register of Patients (diagnoses and operation codes) and the Civil Registration System (information about general population, including time of death). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence rate of ovarian cancer, lifetime risk of ovarian cancer, relative risk of ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Seventy-one women developed ovarian cancer on average 7.0 years after hysterectomy and 10,659 women in the reference group had ovarian cancer diagnosed after on average 6.4 years. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer was 0.27 per 1000 person-years in the group that had undergone hysterectomy and 0.34 per 1000 person-years in the general population (age-standardised). The extrapolated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer was 2.1% after hysterectomy and 2.7% in the general population (RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.60-0.96). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of ovarian cancer is lower among women who have undergone hysterectomy compared with those who have not. The protection seems to decrease with time.
PubMed ID
9386032 View in PubMed
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Infertile women below the age of 40 have similar anti-Müllerian hormone levels and antral follicle count compared with women of the same age with no history of infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279139
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
H W Hvidman
J G Bentzen
L L Thuesen
M P Lauritsen
J L Forman
A. Loft
A. Pinborg
A. Nyboe Andersen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - metabolism
Ovarian Follicle - diagnostic imaging
Ovarian Reserve
Ovulation Induction
Abstract
Do infertile patients below the age of 40 years have a lower ovarian reserve, estimated by anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and total antral follicle count (AFC), than women of the same age with no history of infertility?
Serum AMH and AFC were not lower in infertile patients aged 20-39 years compared with a control group of the same age with no history of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY?: The management of patients with a low ovarian reserve and a poor response to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) remains a challenge in assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Both AMH levels and AFC reflect the ovarian reserve and are valuable predictors of the ovarian response to exogenous gonadotrophins. However, there is a large inter-individual variation in the age-related depletion of the ovarian reserve and a broad variability in the levels of AMH and AFC compatible with conception. Women with an early depletion of the ovarian reserve may experience infertility as a consequence of postponement of childbearing. Thus, low ovarian reserve is considered to be overrepresented among infertile patients.
A prospective cohort study including 382 women with a male partner referred to fertility treatment at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark during 2011-2013 compared with a control group of 350 non-users of hormonal contraception with no history of infertility recruited during 2008-2010.
Included patients and controls were aged 20-39 years. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome were excluded. On Cycle Days 2-5, AFC and ovarian volume were measured by transvaginal sonography, and serum levels of AMH, FSH and LH were assessed.
Infertile patients had similar AMH levels (11%, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1;24%) and AFC (1%, 95% CI: -7;8%) compared with controls with no history of infertility in an age-adjusted linear regression analysis. The prevalence of very low AMH levels (
PubMed ID
26965431 View in PubMed
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[Infertility in ethnic groups. Etiology and treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63908
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 7;162(32):4258-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-2000
Author
B S Hassan Hamid
S. Ziebe
A. Loft
A. Lindhard
H E Bredkjaer
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, Juliane Marie Centret, fertilitetsklinikken. amsi@wanadoo.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 7;162(32):4258-61
Date
Aug-7-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - ethnology
English Abstract
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infertility - ethnology - etiology - therapy
Male
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In this retrospective case control study we analysed the causes and treatments of infertility in 100 ethnic couples consecutively discharged from the Fertility Clinic in the period October 1995 to March 1999. The mean age at referral was 28 years (19-37) for ethnic women and 31 years (24-39) for Danish women. Male infertility was the most frequent cause in ethnic couples compared to Danish couples (24% vs. 16%; NS). Tubal infertility was less frequent in ethnic than in Danish couples (19% vs. 45%; p
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 9;162(41):552211068537
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 9;162(41):552211068536
PubMed ID
10962943 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.