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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Intake follow-up of "no service" cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244606
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;26(3):183-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
A. Lefebvre
E. Weiss
N. Cohen
S. Waldron
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;26(3):183-5
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Psychiatry
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient compliance
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
At The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, an attempt was made to bypass long pre-assessment waiting lists by referring an increasing number of patients to local community resources at the point of the initial intake call. During the pilot study, we contacted 40 families who had been redirected along these lines between January and June 1979. We found that 31 (78%) families had followed our recommendation and most were satisfied with the treatment they were receiving. This suggests that "re-referral" upon intake can often be a highly effective and useful service when provided by a central resource and consultation centre. A further systematic follow-up of all applications to children's mental health clinics, including a careful appraisal of no-show cases (families who are accepted so that we can tailor our services to the specific child psychiatry needs of our varied clientel.
PubMed ID
7237358 View in PubMed
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Is there a solution to the growing demand for hospital space.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245938
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Mar 8;122(5):587-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1980

Levels of cadmium in kidney and liver tissues among a Canadian population (province of Québec).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203171
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1999 Feb 12;56(3):145-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1999
Author
J L Benedetti
O. Samuel
E. Dewailly
S. Gingras
M A Lefebvre
Author Affiliation
Centre de toxicologie du Québec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Pavillon CHUL, Sainte-Foy, Canada. Jean-Louis.Benedetti@chuq.qc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1999 Feb 12;56(3):145-63
Date
Feb-12-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cadmium - analysis
Child
Female
Humans
Kidney - chemistry
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
In an exploratory study, levels of cadmium in whole-kidney and liver tissues of 314 subjects from the general population of the province of Quebec (Canada) were measured postmortem. Frequency distributions of cadmium concentrations were lognormal. As reported in similar studies, age and especially smoking habits were the main variables affecting cadmium concentrations. The geometric mean of whole kidney concentrations (wet weight) was 17.62 microg/g, with a minimum concentration of 2.25 microg/g and a maximum of 100.61 microg/g. Mean concentrations of cadmium in kidneys increased with age, reaching a plateau in the group 50 to 59 yr (29.49 microg/g), and falling slowly thereafter.
PubMed ID
9973001 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of algal toxins in Alaskan marine mammals foraging in a changing arctic and subarctic environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279052
Source
Harmful Algae. 2016 May;55:13-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Kathi A Lefebvre
Lori Quakenbush
Elizabeth Frame
Kathy Burek Huntington
Gay Sheffield
Raphaela Stimmelmayr
Anna Bryan
Preston Kendrick
Heather Ziel
Tracey Goldstein
Jonathan A Snyder
Tom Gelatt
Frances Gulland
Bobette Dickerson
Verena Gill
Source
Harmful Algae. 2016 May;55:13-24
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Current climate trends resulting in rapid declines in sea ice and increasing water temperatures are likely to expand the northern geographic range and duration of favorable conditions for harmful algal blooms (HABs), making algal toxins a growing concern in Alaskan marine food webs. Two of the most common HAB toxins along the west coast of North America are the neurotoxins domoic acid (DA) and saxitoxin (STX). Over the last 20 years, DA toxicosis has caused significant illness and mortality in marine mammals along the west coast of the USA, but has not been reported to impact marine mammals foraging in Alaskan waters. Saxitoxin, the most potent of the paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins, has been well-documented in shellfish in the Aleutians and Gulf of Alaska for decades and associated with human illnesses and deaths due to consumption of toxic clams. There is little information regarding exposure of Alaskan marine mammals. Here, the spatial patterns and prevalence of DA and STX exposure in Alaskan marine mammals are documented in order to assess health risks to northern populations including those species that are important to the nutritional, cultural, and economic well-being of Alaskan coastal communities. In this study, 905 marine mammals from 13 species were sampled including; humpback whales, bowhead whales, beluga whales, harbor porpoises, northern fur seals, Steller sea lions, harbor seals, ringed seals, bearded seals, spotted seals, ribbon seals, Pacific walruses, and northern sea otters. Domoic acid was detected in all 13 species examined and had the greatest prevalence in bowhead whales (68%) and harbor seals (67%). Saxitoxin was detected in 10 of the 13 species, with the highest prevalence in humpback whales (50%) and bowhead whales (32%). Pacific walruses contained the highest concentrations of both STX and DA, with DA concentrations similar to those detected in California sea lions exhibiting clinical signs of DA toxicosis (seizures) off the coast of Central California, USA. Forty-six individual marine mammals contained detectable concentrations of both toxins emphasizing the potential for combined exposure risks. Additionally, fetuses from a beluga whale, a harbor porpoise and a Steller sea lion contained detectable concentrations of DA documenting maternal toxin transfer in these species. These results provide evidence that HAB toxins are present throughout Alaska waters at levels high enough to be detected in marine mammals and have the potential to impact marine mammal health in the Arctic marine environment.
PubMed ID
28073526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of algal toxins in Alaskan marine mammals foraging in a changing arctic and subarctic environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295532
Source
Harmful Algae. 2016 05; 55:13-24
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
05-2016
Author
Kathi A Lefebvre
Lori Quakenbush
Elizabeth Frame
Kathy Burek Huntington
Gay Sheffield
Raphaela Stimmelmayr
Anna Bryan
Preston Kendrick
Heather Ziel
Tracey Goldstein
Jonathan A Snyder
Tom Gelatt
Frances Gulland
Bobette Dickerson
Verena Gill
Author Affiliation
Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: Kathi.Lefebvre@noaa.gov.
Source
Harmful Algae. 2016 05; 55:13-24
Date
05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - metabolism
Arctic Regions
California
Caniformia - metabolism
Cetacea - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Marine Toxins - analysis
Prevalence
Abstract
Current climate trends resulting in rapid declines in sea ice and increasing water temperatures are likely to expand the northern geographic range and duration of favorable conditions for harmful algal blooms (HABs), making algal toxins a growing concern in Alaskan marine food webs. Two of the most common HAB toxins along the west coast of North America are the neurotoxins domoic acid (DA) and saxitoxin (STX). Over the last 20 years, DA toxicosis has caused significant illness and mortality in marine mammals along the west coast of the USA, but has not been reported to impact marine mammals foraging in Alaskan waters. Saxitoxin, the most potent of the paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins, has been well-documented in shellfish in the Aleutians and Gulf of Alaska for decades and associated with human illnesses and deaths due to consumption of toxic clams. There is little information regarding exposure of Alaskan marine mammals. Here, the spatial patterns and prevalence of DA and STX exposure in Alaskan marine mammals are documented in order to assess health risks to northern populations including those species that are important to the nutritional, cultural, and economic well-being of Alaskan coastal communities. In this study, 905 marine mammals from 13 species were sampled including; humpback whales, bowhead whales, beluga whales, harbor porpoises, northern fur seals, Steller sea lions, harbor seals, ringed seals, bearded seals, spotted seals, ribbon seals, Pacific walruses, and northern sea otters. Domoic acid was detected in all 13 species examined and had the greatest prevalence in bowhead whales (68%) and harbor seals (67%). Saxitoxin was detected in 10 of the 13 species, with the highest prevalence in humpback whales (50%) and bowhead whales (32%). Pacific walruses contained the highest concentrations of both STX and DA, with DA concentrations similar to those detected in California sea lions exhibiting clinical signs of DA toxicosis (seizures) off the coast of Central California, USA. Forty-six individual marine mammals contained detectable concentrations of both toxins emphasizing the potential for combined exposure risks. Additionally, fetuses from a beluga whale, a harbor porpoise and a Steller sea lion contained detectable concentrations of DA documenting maternal toxin transfer in these species. These results provide evidence that HAB toxins are present throughout Alaska waters at levels high enough to be detected in marine mammals and have the potential to impact marine mammal health in the Arctic marine environment.
PubMed ID
28073526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Unusual mortality of Tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) in the eastern Bering Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300244
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(5):e0216532
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Timothy Jones
Lauren M Divine
Heather Renner
Susan Knowles
Kathi A Lefebvre
Hillary K Burgess
Charlie Wright
Julia K Parrish
Author Affiliation
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(5):e0216532
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Mass mortality events are increasing in frequency and magnitude, potentially linked with ongoing climate change. In October 2016 through January 2017, St. Paul Island, Bering Sea, Alaska, experienced a mortality event of alcids (family: Alcidae), with over 350 carcasses recovered. Almost three-quarters of the carcasses were unscavenged, a rate much higher than in baseline surveys (17%), suggesting ongoing deposition and elevated mortality around St Paul over a 2-3 month period. Based on the observation that carcasses were not observed on the neighboring island of St. George, we bounded the at-sea distribution of moribund birds, and estimated all species mortality at 3,150 to 8,800 birds. The event was particularly anomalous given the late fall/winter timing when low numbers of beached birds are typical. In addition, the predominance of Tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata, 79% of carcass finds) and Crested auklets (Aethia cristatella, 11% of carcass finds) was unusual, as these species are nearly absent from long-term baseline surveys. Collected specimens were severely emaciated, suggesting starvation as the ultimate cause of mortality. The majority (95%, N = 245) of Tufted puffins were adults regrowing flight feathers, indicating a potential contribution of molt stress. Immediately prior to this event, shifts in zooplankton community composition and in forage fish distribution and energy density were documented in the eastern Bering Sea following a period of elevated sea surface temperatures, evidence cumulatively suggestive of a bottom-up shift in seabird prey availability. We posit that shifts in prey composition and/or distribution, combined with the onset of molt, resulted in this mortality event.
PubMed ID
31141532 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.