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34 records – page 1 of 4.

An uncommon phenotype of poor inducibility of CYP1A1 in human lung is not ascribable to polymorphisms in the AHR, ARNT, or CYP1A1 genes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195935
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2000 Nov;10(8):741-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
S. Anttila
X D Lei
E. Elovaara
A. Karjalainen
W. Sun
H. Vainio
O. Hankinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Johnson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2000 Nov;10(8):741-51
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - biosynthesis - genetics
DNA, Complementary - genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins
Enzyme Induction
Finland
Humans
Lung - enzymology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Smoking - metabolism
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
Cigarette smoking can induce CYP1A1 in the lung. Induction requires the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) proteins. Lung samples from seven of 75 Finnish patients who smoked until the time of surgery exhibited absent or low levels of CYP1A1 protein, mRNA and enzymatic activity, suggesting that these individuals might be genetically non or poorly inducible for CYP1A1. All seven lung samples expressed normal levels of AHR mRNA and ARNT mRNA, indicating that they did not carry inactivating polymorphisms in the 5' upstream regulatory regions of these genes. Sequencing of cDNAs encompassing the complete coding regions of AHR and ARNT identified a previously known codon 554 polymorphism in AHR, which was present in the homozygous state in one individual. This polymorphism, which leads to an amino acid substitution, has previously been reported either to have no effect or to enhance CYP1A1 induction. Previously unreported silent single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in codon 44 of AHR and codon 189 of ARNT. 1500 bp of genomic sequence from the 5' upstream regulatory sequence of the CYP1A1 gene was also sequenced in the non-inducible individuals. A nucleotide substitution polymorphism at position -459 was detected in the heterozygous state in two individuals. This polymorphic site does not reside in any known regulatory sequence. The complete CYP1A1 coding sequence and intron/exon boundaries were then sequenced. None of the non or poorly inducible individuals exhibited any polymorphisms, either homozygous or heterozygous compared to representative inducible individuals or the previously published CYP1A1 sequence. Thus, no polymorphisms in the AHR, ARNT or CYP1A1 genes were identified that could be responsible for the non/low inducibility phenotype observed.
PubMed ID
11186136 View in PubMed
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Are there autoantibodies reacting against citrullinated peptides derived from type I and type II collagens in patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13719
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Oct;64(10):1443-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
M-K Koivula
S. Aman
A. Karjalainen
M. Hakala
J. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Oct;64(10):1443-50
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibody Specificity
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoantigens - immunology
Binding, Competitive
Collagen - immunology
Collagen Type I - immunology
Collagen Type II - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides - immunology
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the possible presence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of autoantibodies recognising citrullinated peptides derived from type I and II collagens. METHODS: Firstly, the binding of four pairs of synthetic peptides (arginine-containing and artificially citrullinated forms) related to different regions of human type II collagen were tested with sera from 120 patients with RA and 81 controls. Secondly, two similar pairs of peptides related to the carboxy terminal telopeptides of the alpha1 and alpha2 chains of human type I collagen were tested. RESULTS: 42-53% of the RA sera showed increased binding of arginine peptides related to type II collagen. However, 12 RA sera bound the citrullinated form of the alpha1(II) telopeptide more strongly than the corresponding arginine peptide. 20 RA sera bound the citrullinated carboxytelopeptide from the alpha1 chain of type I collagen (alpha1(I) telopeptide) more strongly than the respective arginine peptide. The correlation between the autoantibodies to type I and II collagen telopeptides was r(s) = 0.576, p
PubMed ID
16162901 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
M S Huuskonen
A. Karjalainen
A. Tossavainen
J. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupations
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Primary prevention carried out today can reduce the disease incidence in the future decades. The present disease panorama is the consequence of past asbestos exposure mainly before the 1970s. The peak incidence of asbestos-induced diseases will be reached around 2010 in Finland. The number of asbestos-related premature deaths is at present annually about 150 which exceeds the figure of fatal work accidents. Asbestos-related cancer will increase still for 15-20 years and reach its maximum, about 300 cases, in 2010, and will start to decrease after that. More than 20,000 asbestos-exposed workers have participated in the medical screening and follow-up. The termination of exposure, antismoking campaigns, improved diagnostics and careful attention to compensation issues, as well as other potentials for prevention, were the central issue of the Asbestos Program of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. An important objective of research work is to improve early diagnostics, and thereby treatment prospects, in case of asbestos-induced cancers.
PubMed ID
8684292 View in PubMed
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[Asbestos-associated cancer as an occupational disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219564
Source
Duodecim. 1994;110(18):1713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T. Leino
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
Author Affiliation
Työterveyslaitos, työlääketieteen osasto, Helsinki.
Source
Duodecim. 1994;110(18):1713-7
Date
1994
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestosis - complications
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - economics - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - economics - etiology
Middle Aged
Workers' Compensation
PubMed ID
7555762 View in PubMed
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Asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in relation to occupational history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217050
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Nov;26(5):645-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
T. Mäntylä
E. Taskinen
P. Kyyrönen
P. Tukiainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Nov;26(5):645-54
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Asbestos - analysis
Asbestosis - epidemiology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Concentrations of asbestos bodies (AB) were assessed by optical microscopy of 10 ml iron-stained samples and compared with the exposure history acquired by personal interview for 156 patients. Concentrations equalling or exceeding 1 AB/ml were found in 85% of patients who had been heavily exposed to asbestos and only 7% of those who were unlikely to have been exposed. Elevated AB concentrations were observed among primary asbestos, shipyard and construction workers. Smoking was not found to affect the AB concentrations. The use of Papanicolaou-stained cytological Millipore preparations during routine screening was a less sensitive method for the assessment of AB concentrations than that involving iron-stained preparations. The expression of AB concentration as AB/ml or AB/million cells were found to be equally useful indicators of exposure. The correlation between AB concentration and exposure history was greater than in earlier studies on workers exposed to chrysotile. Concentrations exceeding 1 AB/ml were indicative of a nontrivial exposure to asbestos. Despite the observed correlation between AB concentration and exposure history, the individual variability of AB counts, methodological differences and laboratory-bound reference values are important in the interpretation of AB concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid at individual level.
PubMed ID
7832212 View in PubMed
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Asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage in relation to asbestos bodies and asbestos fibres in lung parenchyma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211977
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 May;9(5):1000-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
A. Karjalainen
R. Piipari
T. Mäntylä
M. Mönkkönen
M. Nurminen
P. Tukiainen
E. Vanhala
S. Anttila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 May;9(5):1000-5
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Culture Techniques
Finland
Humans
Lung - chemistry
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
In Finland, unlike other countries, anthophyllite asbestos has been widely used due to its domestic production in 1918-1975. In this particular context, the aim of the present study was to analyse the relationship between asbestos bodies (ABs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the concentration of ABs and the different amphibole asbestos fibres in lung tissue. Sixty five BAL lung tissue sample pairs from patients with pulmonary disease were analysed. The concentration of ABs in BAL fluid and lung tissue was determined with optical microscopy, and the concentration, type and dimensions of asbestos fibres in lung tissue with scanning electron microscopy. There was a significant correlation between the concentrations of ABs in BAL fluid and in lung tissue (r = 0.72; p
PubMed ID
8793463 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure among Finnish lung cancer patients: occupational history and fiber concentration in lung tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221594
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1993 Mar;23(3):461-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
L. Heikkilä
P. Karhunen
H. Vainio
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1993 Mar;23(3):461-71
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Biopsy
Body Burden
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Carcinoma, Small Cell - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Interviews as Topic
Lung - pathology
Lung Neoplasms - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Occupational Exposure
Reference Values
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
In a series of 65 surgically treated lung cancer patients, past exposure to asbestos was evaluated by personal interviews, and by scanning electron microscopy analyses of the mineral fibers in lung tissue. Lung tissue samples of 17 autopsied male office workers were analyzed as referents. According to occupational history, 37% of the lung cancer patients had definite or probable, 31% possible, and 32% unlikely exposure to asbestos. The fiber concentration in the lung tissue ranged from
PubMed ID
8389099 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and pulmonary fiber concentrations of 300 Finnish urban men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218962
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
E. Vanhala
P J Karhunen
K. Lalu
A. Penttilä
A. Tossavainen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - isolation & purification
Asbestosis - mortality - pathology
Cause of Death
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the pulmonary concentrations of mineral fibers in the Finnish male urban population and to evaluate the analysis of pulmonary fiber burden by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as an indicator of past fiber exposure.
The pulmonary concentration of mineral fibers was determined by SEM and compared with occupational history for a series of 300 autopsies of urban men aged 33 to 69 years.
The concentration of fibers (f) longer than 1 micron ranged from
PubMed ID
8016597 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and the risk of lung cancer in a general urban population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217694
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Aug;20(4):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
E. Vanhala
H. Vainio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Aug;20(4):243-50
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Carcinoma - etiology - pathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Urban health
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the asbestos-associated risk of lung cancer according to histological type of cancer, lobe of origin, pulmonary concentration, and type of amphibole fibers and also to estimate the etiologic fraction of asbestos for lung cancer.
The pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers in 113 surgically treated male lung cancer patients and 297 autopsy cases among men serving as referents was determined by scanning electron microscopy. The age- and smoking-adjusted odds ratios of lung cancer were calculated according to pulmonary fiber concentration for all lung cancer types, squamous-cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma and for the lower-lobe and the upper- and middle-lobe cancers.
The risk of lung cancer was increased according to the pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers (f) of 1.0 to 4.99 x 10(6) f.g-1 [odds ratio (OR) 1.7] and > or = 5.0 x 10(6) f.g-1 (OR 5.3). The odds ratios associated with fiber concentrations of > or = 1.0 x 10(6) f.g-1 were higher for adenocarcinoma (OR 4.0) than for squamous-cell carcinoma (OR 1.6). The asbestos-associated risk was higher for lower lobe tumors than for upper lobe tumors. The risk estimates for anthophyllite and crocidolite-amosite fibers were similar, except for the risk of squamous-cell carcinoma. An etiologic fraction of 19% was calculated for asbestos among male surgical lung cancer patients in the greater Helsinki area.
Past exposure to asbestos is a significant factor in the etiology of lung cancer in southern Finland. The asbestos-associated risk seems to be higher for pulmonary adenocarcinoma and lower-lobe tumors than for squamous-cell carcinoma and upper-lobe tumors.
PubMed ID
7801069 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.