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Practical usage of computer-supported outbreak detection in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100407
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010 Sep 9;15(36)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-2010
Author
A. Hulth
N. Andrews
S. Ethelberg
J. Dreesman
D. Faensen
W. van Pelt
J. Schnitzler
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden. anette.hulth@smi.se
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010 Sep 9;15(36)
Date
Sep-9-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Algorithms
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Germany - epidemiology
Government Agencies
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Infection Control - organization & administration
Netherlands - epidemiology
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Population Surveillance - methods
Probability
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper discusses computer-supported outbreak detection using routine surveillance data, as implemented at six institutes for infectious disease control in five European countries. We give an overview of the systems used at the Statens Serum Institut (Denmark), Health Protection Agency (England, Wales and Northern Ireland), Robert Koch Institute (Germany), Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony (Germany), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (the Netherlands) and Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (Sweden). Despite the usefulness of the algorithms or the outbreak detection procedure itself, all institutes have experienced certain limitations of the systems. The paper therefore concludes with a list of recommendations for institutes planning to introduce computer-supported outbreak detection, based on experiences on the practical usage of the systems. This list--which concerns usability, standard operating procedures and evaluation--might also inspire improvements of systems in use today.
PubMed ID
20843470 View in PubMed
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Syndromic surveillance for local outbreak detection and awareness: evaluating outbreak signals of acute gastroenteritis in telephone triage, web-based queries and over-the-counter pharmacy sales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113898
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Feb;142(2):303-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
T. Andersson
P. Bjelkmar
A. Hulth
J. Lindh
S. Stenmark
M. Widerström
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Feb;142(2):303-13
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidiarrheals - therapeutic use
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology
Humans
Internet - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Nonprescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Population Surveillance - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Telephone
Triage
Abstract
For the purpose of developing a national system for outbreak surveillance, local outbreak signals were compared in three sources of syndromic data--telephone triage of acute gastroenteritis, web queries about symptoms of gastrointestinal illness, and over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacy sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. The data sources were compared against nine known waterborne and foodborne outbreaks in Sweden in 2007-2011. Outbreak signals were identified for the four largest outbreaks in the telephone triage data and the two largest outbreaks in the data on OTC sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. No signals could be identified in the data on web queries. The signal magnitude for the fourth largest outbreak indicated a tenfold larger outbreak than officially reported, supporting the use of telephone triage data for situational awareness. For the two largest outbreaks, telephone triage data on adult diarrhoea provided outbreak signals at an early stage, weeks and months in advance, respectively, potentially serving the purpose of early event detection. In conclusion, telephone triage data provided the most promising source for surveillance of point-source outbreaks.
Notes
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Cites: Euro Surveill. 2011;16(18). pii: 1985621586265
PubMed ID
23672877 View in PubMed
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Syndromic surveillance of influenza activity in Sweden: an evaluation of three tools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266056
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Aug;143(11):2390-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
T. Ma
H. Englund
P. Bjelkmar
A. Wallensten
A. Hulth
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Aug;143(11):2390-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hotlines
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Internet
Primary Health Care
Schools
Sick Leave
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An evaluation was conducted to determine which syndromic surveillance tools complement traditional surveillance by serving as earlier indicators of influenza activity in Sweden. Web queries, medical hotline statistics, and school absenteeism data were evaluated against two traditional surveillance tools. Cross-correlation calculations utilized aggregated weekly data for all-age, nationwide activity for four influenza seasons, from 2009/2010 to 2012/2013. The surveillance tool indicative of earlier influenza activity, by way of statistical and visual evidence, was identified. The web query algorithm and medical hotline statistics performed equally well as each other and to the traditional surveillance tools. School absenteeism data were not reliable resources for influenza surveillance. Overall, the syndromic surveillance tools did not perform with enough consistency in season lead nor in earlier timing of the peak week to be considered as early indicators. They do, however, capture incident cases before they have formally entered the primary healthcare system.
PubMed ID
25471689 View in PubMed
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Web query-based surveillance in Sweden during the influenza A(H1N1)2009 pandemic, April 2009 to February 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134435
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(18)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
A. Hulth
G. Rydevik
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden. anette.hulth@smi.se
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(18)
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Internet
Models, Statistical
Population Surveillance - methods
Qualitative Research
Reproducibility of Results
Search Engine
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
At the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, statistical models based on queries submitted to a Swedish medical website are used as a complement to the regular influenza surveillance. The models have previously been shown to perform well for seasonal influenza. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the statistical models in the context of the influenza A(H1N1)2009 pandemic, a period when many factors, for example the media, could have influenced people's search behaviour on the Internet and consequently the performance of the models. Our evaluation indicates consistent good reliability for the statistical models also during the pandemic. When compared to Google Flu Trends for Sweden, they were at least equivalent in terms of estimating the influenza activity, and even seemed to be more precise in estimating the peak incidence of the influenza pandemic.
PubMed ID
21586265 View in PubMed
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