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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Can Nurse. 1974 May;70(5):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1974
Author
A. Hall
Source
Can Nurse. 1974 May;70(5):33-6
Date
May-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health education
Humans
Saskatchewan
Women
PubMed ID
4829852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Imposing order: a process to manage day-to-day activities in two-earner families with preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165661
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2007 Feb;13(1):56-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wendy A Hall
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Canada. wendy.hall@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2007 Feb;13(1):56-82
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Child Rearing - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Employment - psychology
England
Family Health - ethnology
Female
Housekeeping
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Planning Techniques
Questionnaires
Time Management
Abstract
This study investigated how English and Canadian families with preschool children used strategies to impose varying levels of order to manage day-to-day activities. This grounded theory study is a secondary analysis of 55 hours of participant observation and interviews with 58 individuals and 29 couples. Constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling were used to construct categories. To attempt to impose order, strategies used by families included organizing and planning, establishing routines, setting limits, setting standards, purchasing services and technology, and delegating tasks. Most families used these strategies successfully; costs outweighed benefits where families concentrated inflexibly on a few strategies in particular spheres of activity or had difficulty using strategies. Families using a variety of strategies flexibly were better at balancing personal and family goals, promoting fulfillment, health, and happiness for each family member, and fostering family development and commitment. Imposing order links everyday family dynamics and concerns to long-term goals.
PubMed ID
17220382 View in PubMed
Less detail

Public risk from tasers: unacceptably high or low enough to accept?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152988
Source
CJEM. 2009 Jan;11(1):84-6, 87-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Christine A Hall
Source
CJEM. 2009 Jan;11(1):84-6, 87-9
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Electric Injuries - etiology
Electroshock - instrumentation
Humans
Law Enforcement - methods
Restraint, Physical - legislation & jurisprudence
Weapons - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment On: CJEM. 2009 Jan;11(1):90-319166645
PubMed ID
19166643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Balancing personal and family trajectories: an international study of dual-earner couples with pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186070
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):401-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Wendy A Hall
Peter Callery
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, School of Nursing, T 201 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5. hall@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):401-12
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Cultural Comparison
England
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Parenting - psychology
Social Support
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
In general, the nursing literature neglects healthy families and depictions of families are dominated by systems and developmental theory. The preponderance of dual-earner families has changed the meaning of family, however, nurses have given minimal attention to how women and men attend to work and home. Balancing personal and family trajectories is a substantive theory that accounts for how Canadian and English couples with pre-school children managed work and family life. The theory describes their efforts to maximize personal and family development, by using processes that attempted to support and sustain individual and family health, happiness, and fulfillment.
PubMed ID
12667517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Posthospitalization breastfeeding patterns of moderately preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186102
Source
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2003 Jan-Mar;17(1):50-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joanne Wooldridge
Wendy A Hall
Author Affiliation
General Nursing Program, Douglas College, New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. j-wooldridge@douglas.bc.ca
Source
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2003 Jan-Mar;17(1):50-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Breast Feeding
Canada
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Mothers - psychology
Twins
Abstract
Little is known about how preterm infants make the transition from breast-feeding and bottle feeding to exclusive breast-feeding in the weeks following hospital discharge. This study examined the breastfeeding patterns of preterm infants born at 30 to 35 weeks' gestation over a 4-week period following hospitalization.
Daily feeding diaries were completed by 53 mothers. These diaries were used to describe the proportion of breast milk feeds and feeds directly at breast.
Infants received a high proportion of breast milk feeds, with 60% receiving breast milk exclusively for the first week, and 56% receiving breast milk exclusively for the 4-week period. The proportion of feeds at breast increased steadily over the 4 weeks, with 50% primarily breastfeeding in week 4. Infants who received breast milk exclusively in week 1 were significantly more likely to be primarily fed directly at breast in week 4.
Adequacy of the milk supply was a key factor in the successful transition from primarily bottle feeding at hospital discharge to primarily breast-feeding at home. The study provides some insight about this complex and poorly understood transition.
PubMed ID
12661739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's perceptions of living with a parent with a mental illness: finding the rhythm and maintaining the frame.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155996
Source
Qual Health Res. 2008 Aug;18(8):1127-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Elaine Mordoch
Wendy A Hall
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2008 Aug;18(8):1127-44
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental disorders
Parents - psychology
Abstract
In this article, we explain how children managed their experiences of living with a parent with a mental illness. Symbolic interactionism served as the theoretical framework. The sample comprised 22 children between 6 and 16 years of age, who were living part- or full-time with a parent with depression, schizophrenia, or bipolar illness. Data collection included interviews, participant observation, and drawing. Concurrent data collection and constant comparative analysis were undertaken to generate two core variables: finding the rhythm and maintaining the frame. Finding a rhythm with their parents required children to monitor and adjust to their parents' behaviors so they could maintain connections with parents and family stability. Maintaining the frame allowed children to create safe distances between themselves and their parents so they could preserve themselves while trying to stay connected. The children were managing their lives and identities to avoid being engulfed by their parents' mental illnesses.
PubMed ID
18650567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes and preferences of young women with low and high fear of childbirth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102768
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1495-505
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Kathrin Stoll
Wendy A Hall
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1495-505
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Choice Behavior
Fear
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined constructions of labor and birth for 461 Canadian women who attended the University of British Columbia (Canada) and participated in an online survey about pregnancy and birth, using a combination of Likert items and open-ended questions. We performed a content analysis of women's open-ended responses about their feelings toward birth and analyzed comments of women with high and low fear of childbirth separately. Students with high fear of birth described childbirth as a frightening and painful ordeal and viewed obstetric interventions as a means to make labor and birth more manageable. Students with low fear constructed birth as a natural event and regarded interventions more critically. Students in both groups supported women's autonomous maternity care decisions. Our findings contribute to care providers' and educators' knowledge about preferences and fears expressed by the next generation of maternity care consumers and potential strategies to reduce their fear of childbirth.
PubMed ID
24108088 View in PubMed
Less detail

The perfectionism model of binge eating: tests of an integrative model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152323
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2009 Mar;96(3):690-709
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Simon B Sherry
Peter A Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada. simon.sherry@dal.ca
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2009 Mar;96(3):690-709
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interpersonal Relations
Models, Psychological
Neurotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Social Adjustment
Social Perception
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
This study proposes, tests, and supports the perfectionism model of binge eating (PMOBE), a model aimed at explaining why perfectionism is related to binge eating. According to this model, socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) confers risk for binge eating by generating exposure to 4 triggers of binge episodes: interpersonal discrepancies, low interpersonal esteem, depressive affect, and dietary restraint. In testing the PMOBE, a daily diary was completed by 566 women for 7 days. Predictions derived from the PMOBE were supported, with tests of mediation suggesting that the indirect effect of SPP on binge eating through triggers of binge episodes was significant. Reciprocal relations were also observed, with certain triggers of binge episodes predicting binge eating (and vice versa). Results supported the incremental validity of the PMOBE over and above self-oriented perfectionism and neuroticism and the generalizability of this model across Asian and European Canadian participants. The PMOBE offers a novel view of individuals with high levels of SPP as active agents who raise their risk of binge eating by generating conditions in their daily lives that are conducive to binge episodes.
PubMed ID
19254113 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admissions to a provincial psychiatric hospital: the effects of opening a second in-patient facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112386
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1965 Sep 11;93(11):598-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1965
Author
M. Demay
G. Marjerrison
A. Hall
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1965 Sep 11;93(11):598-602
Date
Sep-11-1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Until 1955, the Saskatchewan Hospital, North Battleford, was the only facility designated for in-patient psychiatric treatment of the northern half of Saskatchewan's population. In that year the University Hospital's 39-bed psychiatric unit was opened in Saskatoon, but the number of Saskatoon patients referred to North Battleford have continued to increase.A statistical study of changes in the annual admission rates (patients/1000 population) to the Saskatchewan Hospital shows that the opening of the University Hospital unit has reduced the rate of intake of Saskatoon residents to the Saskatchewan Hospital. This decrease is related to specific diagnostic groups. There have also been changes in methods of referral.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Feb 16;88:360-413993159
PubMed ID
5825978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geographic variation of native people along the Pacific Coast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6856
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Jun;67(3):407-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
R L Hall
D A Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Oregon State University, Corvallis 97331-6403, USA.
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Jun;67(3):407-26
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anthropometry
Body constitution
Climate
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Models, Theoretical
Northwestern United States - ethnology
Regression Analysis
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
Data gathered by Boas in the 1890s from 1749 adult males and 1056 adult females were subjected to anthropometric analyses to investigate possible effects of climatic adaptation. The subjects were native people from California, Oregon, Washington, the panhandle of Alaska, and British Columbia. They were categorized by their tribe's latitude and longitude (the center point of tribal distribution) and by habitat (characterized as coastal, western lowlands, and interior). Multiple R regressions were used to determine complex relationships between age, habitat, latitude, rainfall, mean January temperature, mean July temperature, and blood quantum, all of which affected some anthropometric variables to statistically significant degrees in both the male and the female samples. Body size and proportional differences support other studies of Bergmann's and Allen's rules, and variation in the nasal index supports prior studies of selection of longer, narrower noses in cold and dry climates and broader noses in warmer, moister ones. Recent disruption in the central portion of the study area was detectable in reduced size of subjects in these regions. Other complicating factors, such as ethnicity and the possibility of prior migrations and intermarriage between populations, are discussed.
PubMed ID
7607636 View in PubMed
Less detail

28 records – page 1 of 3.