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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Body size and prostate cancer: a 20-year follow-up study among 135006 Swedish construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22154
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Mar 5;89(5):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1997
Author
S O Andersson
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
H O Adami
G. Engholm
A. Englund
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Orebro Medical Center, Sweden.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Mar 5;89(5):385-9
Date
Mar-5-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with endocrine changes (e.g., increased estrogen and decreased testosterone in the blood) that have been implicated in the cause of prostate cancer and, therefore, an association between body weight and the risk of developing prostate cancer would be expected. However, because of bias or low statistical power in previous epidemiologic studies, associations between anthropometric measurements (height and weight), body mass index (BMI), and the risk of prostate cancer may have been inadvertently overlooked. PURPOSE: We performed a large, retrospective cohort study among Swedish construction workers to evaluate possible associations of adult weight, height, BMI, and lean body mass (LBM) by age at entry in the study with the incidence and mortality rate of prostate cancer. METHODS: We analyzed data that had been compiled in a computerized central register on a cohort of approximately 135000 male construction workers. Information on height and weight had been collected with the use of a comprehensive questionnaire filled out by nurses at the time of enrollment in the cohort, from 1971 through 1975. Complete follow-up was achieved through 1991 by means of record linkage to the Swedish National Cancer Register, the Death Register, and the Migration Register. A total of 2368 incident cases and 708 deaths from prostate cancer occurred in the cohort during a follow-up period averaging 18 years. We used only information obtained at the index visit from 1971 through 1975 to determine age-adjusted rate ratios (RRs) in a Poisson-based multiplicative multivariate model with age and the relevant exposure variable (e.g., weight, height, BMI, and LBM) as independent variables. RESULTS: All anthropometric measurements were positively associated with the risk of prostate cancer and were more strongly related to mortality than to incidence. The excess risk of death from prostate cancer was statistically significant in all BMI categories above the reference category: RR = 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-1.81) in the highest category compared with the lowest (P for trend = .04). For height and LBM, the excess risk in the highest compared with the lowest categories was somewhat less pronounced: RR = 1.28 (95% CI = 1.02-1.60) and RR = 1.26 (95% CI = 1.02-1.57), respectively. Statistically significant linear dose-response relationships were also found with the incidence of prostate cancer, with the exception of BMI (P for trend = .10). CONCLUSION: Our large cohort study indicates that various aspects of body size are related to the risk of prostate cancer and that future studies are needed to study the role of body size and prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
9060961 View in PubMed
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Controlled study of a new five-component acellular pertussis vaccine in adults and young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36528
Source
J Infect Dis. 1992 Dec;166(6):1436-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
J A Englund
W P Glezen
L. Barreto
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1992 Dec;166(6):1436-41
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Comparative Study
Corynebacterium diphtheriae - immunology
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects - immunology
Evaluation Studies
Humans
Immunoglobulins - blood
Infant
Middle Aged
Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Whooping Cough - prevention & control
Abstract
A new five-component acellular pertussis (AP) vaccine containing 10 micrograms of pertussis toxoid, 5 micrograms of filamentous hemagglutinin, 5 micrograms of combined agglutinogens 2 and 3, and 3 micrograms of pertactin was evaluated in adults and young children. AP vaccine was compared with saline placebo in 31 adults, and AP vaccine combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (ADTP) was compared with whole cell DTP in 41 children, ages 16-20 months, who had received whole cell DTP during infancy. AP was mildly to moderately reactogenic in adults, with pain noted within 72 h and 5-8 days after immunization. ADTP was less reactogenic than DTP in children, with significantly decreased pain, redness, irritability, and fever and less use of acetaminophen reported. No late reactions were observed in any child. The multicomponent ADTP was immunogenic, with four-fold or greater antibody rises to at least four pertussis antibody assays in all 15 immunized adults. Pertussis-specific antibody responses in children who received ADTP and DTP were similar. The multicomponent ADTP vaccine is currently being studied in a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored efficacy study in Sweden.
PubMed ID
1431261 View in PubMed
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The genetics of neurotic-reactive depression: a reanalysis of Shapiro's (1970) twin study using diagnostic criteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46674
Source
J Affect Disord. 1990 Apr;18(4):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
S A Englund
D N Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Champaign 61820.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1990 Apr;18(4):247-52
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - genetics - psychology
Adult
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
The present study explored the role of genetic factors in the development of neurotic depression. Case studies of 16 monozygotic (MZ) and 14 same-sex dizygotic (DZ) twins from Robert Shapiro's 1970 study of non-endogenous depression were rediagnosed by two raters blind to the zygosity and identity of each twin. Diagnoses were made using Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) and George Winokur's 1985 criteria for neurotic-reactive depression. When neurotic depression was operationally defined using Winokur's criteria plus RDC major or definite minor depression, the concordance rate for MZ twins was significantly greater than that for DZ twins. Our results contrast with Shapiro's negative findings, probably due to our use of formal diagnostic criteria and Shapiro's requirement that cotwins be hospitalized to be considered concordant. The present results suggest that genetic factors play a role in the etiology of at least some forms of neurotic depression.
PubMed ID
2140376 View in PubMed
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Identifying Gaps in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Epidemiology in the United States Prior to the Introduction of Vaccines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285613
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Sep 15;65(6):1020-1025
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2017
Author
Lindsay Kim
Brian Rha
Jon S Abramson
Larry J Anderson
Carrie L Byington
Grace L Chen
John DeVincenzo
Kathryn M Edwards
Janet A Englund
Ann R Falsey
Marie R Griffin
Ruth A Karron
Karen G Martin
H Cody Meissner
Flor M Munoz
Andrew T Pavia
Pedro A Piedra
William Schaffner
Eric A F Simões
Rosalyn Singleton
H Keipp Talbot
Edward E Walsh
Jane R Zucker
Susan I Gerber
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Sep 15;65(6):1020-1025
Date
Sep-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes lower respiratory tract illness frequently. No effective antivirals or vaccines for RSV are approved for use in the United States; however, there are at least 50 vaccines and monoclonal antibody products in development, with those targeting older adults and pregnant women (to protect young infants) in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials. Unanswered questions regarding RSV epidemiology need to be identified and addressed prior to RSV vaccine introduction to guide the measurement of impact and future recommendations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) convened a technical consultation to gather input from external subject matter experts on their individual perspectives regarding evidence gaps in current RSV epidemiology in the United States, potential studies and surveillance platforms needed to fill these gaps, and prioritizing efforts. Participants articulated their individual views, and CDC staff synthesized individuals' input into this report.
PubMed ID
28903503 View in PubMed
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Morbidity and mortality patterns in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23262
Source
Occup Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;10(2):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Engholm
A. Englund
Author Affiliation
Department of Provincial and Regional Health and Medical Care, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Occup Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;10(2):261-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Facility Design and Construction
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Morbidity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
This extensive review of morbidity and mortality patterns cites data from Bygghälsan, a Swedish program that has followed a quarter of a million construction workers for two decades. Comparisons are made among different types of workers, and standardized mortality ratios and standardized incidence ratios are presented.
PubMed ID
7667739 View in PubMed
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Mortality and cancer morbidity in a group of Swedish VCM and PCV production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27800
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1976 Oct;17:167-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1976
Author
D. Byrén
G. Engholm
A. Englund
P. Westerholm
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1976 Oct;17:167-70
Date
Oct-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Chemical Industry
Humans
Mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Polyvinyl Chloride
Polyvinyls
Registries
Suicide - epidemiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Vinyl Chloride
Vinyl Compounds
Abstract
The cohort of workers employed in a Swedish vinyl chloride/poly(vinyl chloride) plant since its start in the early 1940's has been followed for mortality and cancer morbidity patterns. Only 21 of the 771 persons could not be traced. Difficulties in establishing exposure levels at different work areas in the past makes an evaluation of dose-effect relationships impossible. A four- to fivefold excess of pancreas/liver tumors was found, including two cases later classified as angiosarcomas of the liver. The number of brain tumors and suicide do not deviate significantly from expected. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, on the other hand, differ significantly from the expected. The discrepancies between previous reports on VCM/PVC workers and this report are discussed. The possible etiology of the cardiovascular deaths is also discussed.
PubMed ID
1026402 View in PubMed
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Nasal and sinonasal cancer. Connection with occupational exposures in Denmark, Finland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26913
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1983 Aug;9(4):315-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1983
Author
S. Hernberg
P. Westerholm
K. Schultz-Larsen
R. Degerth
E. Kuosma
A. Englund
U. Engzell
H S Hansen
P. Mutanen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1983 Aug;9(4):315-26
Date
Aug-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nose Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia
Abstract
A joint Danish-Finnish-Swedish case-referent investigation was initiated in 1977 in order to study the connection between nasal and sinonasal cancer and various occupational exposures. All new cases of nasal and sinonasal cancer were collected from the national cancer registers (Finland and Sweden) or from the hospitals (Denmark). Those still alive who agreed to an interview (N = 167) were individually matched for age and sex with patients with colonic or rectal cancer. A detailed telephone interview was made according to standardized forms. Both cases and referents thought that their condition was the one under study. The exposures were coded blindly by an industrial hygienist. The results showed associations between nasal and sinonasal cancer and exposure to (i) hardwood or mixed wood dust (discordant pairs 14: 2), (ii) softwood dust alone (13:4), (iii) chromium (16: 6), (iv) nickel (12: 5, not significant), (v) welding, flame-cutting and soldering (17: 6), and (vi) lacquers and paints (14: 0). The last finding was probably due to confounding from wood dust exposure. Hardwood dust exposure was associated with adenocarcinoma. Softwood dust exposure alone was associated with epidermoid and anaplastic carcinomas. No associations were found for a number of exposures, including agricultural chemicals, textile dust, asbestos, quartz dust, organic solvents and leather work. Possible exposure to formaldehyde was evenly distributed between the cases and referents.
PubMed ID
6635610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nasal cancer and occupational exposures. Preliminary report of a joint Nordic case-referent study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26940
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1983 Apr;9(2 Spec No):208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
S. Hernberg
Y. Collan
R. Degerth
A. Englund
U. Engzell
E. Kuosma
P. Mutanen
H. Nordlinder
H S Hansen
K. Schultz-Larsen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1983 Apr;9(2 Spec No):208-13
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Metals - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Nose Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Paint - adverse effects
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Wood
Abstract
Nasal and sinus paranasal cancers have been associated with several occupational exposures, for example, dust from hardwood, nickel and unspecific agents occurring in the boot and shoe industry. A joint Danish-Finnish-Swedish case-referent investigation was initiated in 1977 to study further the connection between nasal and sinus paranasal cancers and various occupational exposures. All new cases of these cancers were collected from the national cancer registers (Finland & Sweden) or from hospitals (Denmark). Those still alive who agreed to the interview (N = 167) were individually matched for age and sex with patients with colonic or rectal cancer. A detailed telephone interview was performed according to a standardized procedure. Both the cases and referents thought that their condition was the one under study. The exposures were coded blindly by an experienced industrial hygienist. The results showed associations between nasal or sinus paranasal cancer and exposure to hardwood or mixed wood dust (discordant pairs 14/2); softwood dust alone (13/4); chromium 16/6); nickel (12/5, not significant); welding, flamecutting, and soldering (17/16); and lacquers and paints (12/0). Hardwood dust exposure showed a connection with adenocarcinoma. Softwood dust exposure alone was associated with epidermoid and anaplastic carcinomas. No associations were found for a number of exposures, including agricultural chemicals, textile dust, asbestos, quartz dust, organic solvents, and leather work. Possible exposure to formaldehyde was evenly distributed between the cases and referents.
PubMed ID
6648420 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.