Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

[4-year experiences with computer-assisted registration of postoperative wound infections and identification of risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226352
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1991
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
A M Sørensen
E. Brems-Dalgaard
D. Raahave
J V Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-9
Date
May-13-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing of 9,181 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 5.7%, ranging from 2.0% (clean wounds) to 22.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.7%, 0.4% and 5.4%, respectively. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, ten risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant for both departments were: wound contamination, duration of operation and age. In addition, in the department of orthopaedic surgery: date of operation and surgeon, and in the department of general surgery: planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. Sex had no influence on postoperative infection. Significant factors altered during the four years. Postoperative stay was, on an average, 13.9 days longer in infected patients.
PubMed ID
2028549 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Automatic data processing registration of postoperative wound infections. A prevalence study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233324
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Mar 14;150(11):649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-1988

Computer-aided surveillance of surgical infections and identification of risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231793
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
D. Raahave
R. Beier-Holgersen
J V Pedersen
S. Andersen
A I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-18
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Denmark
Hospital Departments
Humans
Models, Statistical
Orthopedics
Risk factors
Surgery Department, Hospital
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A continuous record of postoperative surgical infections was carried out by electronic data processing (EDP) of 4340 orthopaedic and general operations. The overall infection rate was 6.3%, ranging from 2.3% (clean wounds) to 27.1% (dirty wounds). The corresponding deep infection rates were 1.6%, 0.4% and 4.6%. Employing a multiple logistic regression analysis, 10 risk factors were evaluated. Factors found to be significant were: wound contamination, department, duration of operation, date of operation and age, and in addition for the department of general surgery: surgeon, planning of operation, length of preoperative stay and anatomic groups. A statistical model for identification of risk patients is described. Postoperative stay was on average 20.5 days longer in infected patients. We find that EDP-recording may result in an annual cost reduction of at least 175,000 pounds for our hospital.
PubMed ID
2564012 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217190
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
K B Poulsen
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Social Security - economics
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures.
Notes
Cites: Ann Surg. 1977 Mar;185(3):264-8300233
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1980 Feb;60(1):27-407361226
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1980 Feb;141(2):248-576767793
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jul 7;142(28):18287414732
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 Jul 13;143(29):1815-97292767
Cites: World J Surg. 1982 May;6(3):362-57113241
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1984 May-Jun;75(3):248-506744198
Cites: Lakartidningen. 1985 Dec 11;82(50):4428, 4430-14079617
Cites: Infect Control. 1986 Feb;7(2 Suppl):92-53633895
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1986 Sep;42(3):240-63092753
Cites: Zentralbl Chir. 1987;112(24):1552-603442144
Cites: Nord Med. 1988;103(4):135-73375042
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 May 9;150(19):1147-83376254
Cites: Arch Surg. 1988 Nov;123(11):1305-83140764
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-182564012
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1990 Feb;11(2):89-932107250
Cites: Arch Surg. 1990 Jun;125(6):794-8032346380
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jul 16;152(29):2106-102399578
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-92028549
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1420-22028550
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Apr;30(4):373-61556884
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1992 Oct;39(5):467-701424821
PubMed ID
7925666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Few microorganisms associated with bacterial vaginosis may constitute the pathologic core: a population-based microbiologic study among 3596 pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64232
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Mar;178(3):580-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Thorsen
I P Jensen
B. Jeune
N. Ebbesen
M. Arpi
A. Bremmelgaard
B R Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Mar;178(3):580-7
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacteroides - isolation & purification - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gardnerella vaginalis - isolation & purification - physiology
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification - physiology
Mycoplasma hominis - isolation & purification - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Vaginosis, Bacterial - diagnosis - microbiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between various microorganisms isolated from the genital tract in pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study among pregnant women addressed at their first antenatal visit before 24 full gestational weeks from the referring area of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from November 1992 to February 1994. The main outcome measures were prevalence of various microorganisms and statistical estimates of interactions (crude, adjusted, and relative odds ratios) between the microorganisms isolated from the lower genital tract in pregnant women with and without clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. RESULTS: Three thousand five hundred ninety-six (3596) pregnant women were asked to participate. Of the 3596 pregnant women 3174 (88.4%) agreed to participate before 24 full gestational weeks. After controlling for the presence of other microorganisms, strong associations between Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, Mycoplasma hominis, and present bacterial vaginosis were found. Similarly Lactobacillus spp. were found to be associated with the absence of bacterial vaginosis. The combination of G. vaginalis and anaerobic bacteria and/or M. hominis was found in 59.6% of the cases with bacterial vaginosis and in 3.9% of the cases without bacterial vaginosis (odds ratio 36.4, 95% confidence interval 27.8 to 47.8). The crude odds ratio was found to be as high as 74.8 (95% confidence interval 32.3 to 174.1) when the combination of G. vaginalis, M. hominis, anaerobic bacteria, and no Lactobacillus spp. was associated with bacterial vaginosis. CONCLUSION: There is a microbial foundation for bacterial vaginosis, and it is possibly due to an intermicrobial interaction in which the microorganisms G. vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and M. hominis are dominating, indicating that these constitute the pathologic core of bacterial vaginosis.
PubMed ID
9539529 View in PubMed
Less detail

Microbiological and immunological studies in a case of human melioidosis diagnosed in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69863
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A. Bremmelgaard
I. Bygbjerg
N. Høiby
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):271-5
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibody formation
Denmark
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocyte Activation
Male
Melioidosis - diagnosis - immunology - microbiology
Middle Aged
Pseudomonas - pathogenicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculin Test
Abstract
The first case of melioidosis reported in Denmark was in a 64-year-old man 2 weeks after his return from a 3-week visit to Kenya. The clinical course was characterized by septicaemia and Pseudomonas pseudomallei was isolated from repeated blood cultures, urine and sputum. Transient impairment of cellular immunity was observed. During the convalescence a cell-mediated immune response against the pathogen was detected by the lymphocyte blast transformation test. Two precipitins against P. pseudomallei were detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis; the most pronounced was directed against the common antigen of P. aeruginosa. The patient was treated with a combination of oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim for one month, followed by sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim for another month. The clinical response to the treatment was good. The patient had previously had recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. The relationship of melioidosis to tuberculosis is briefly discussed.
PubMed ID
7163779 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Models for calculating risks as a tool in screening for cardiovascular diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55357
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 16;152(16):1161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-1990
Author
T E Bryndorf
H H Petersen
A. Baastrup
A. Bremmelgaard
J. Videbaek
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 16;152(16):1161-4
Date
Apr-16-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Models, Cardiovascular
Risk factors
Abstract
In connection with screening for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease in Bispebjerg Hospital, we have assessed three different models for calculation of the risk, employed on our own material. A total of 462 persons participated in the screening and 275 of these were under the age of 65 years. Out of these 275, 92 had plasma cholesterol values over or equal to 7.0 mmol/l and or smoked over 20 gram tobacco daily. On comparison between three models for calculation of the risk: one American, one British and one Swedish, moderate agreement was observed: the correlation coefficients varied between 0.75 and 0.89. The reason for this may be that the models for calculation of the risk are constructed on the basis of statistics already described from epidemiological investigations in which coincidence is demonstrated between selected observable factors and ischaemic heart disease. It is thus possible that the factors which we measure and possibly attempt to influence are not pathogenetic. We consider, therefore, that risk scoring should be employed with caution. As causal connection between ischaemic heart disease and cholesterol and smoking, respectively, have been demonstrated with reasonable certainty, we consider that it is reasonable to screen and intervene for these factors alone.
PubMed ID
2330641 View in PubMed
Less detail

New operative technique to reduce surgeons' risk of HIV infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8252
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Jun;18 Suppl A:177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
D. Raahave
A. Bremmelgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Jun;18 Suppl A:177-83
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asepsis - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
HIV-1
Humans
Models, Statistical
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Perioperative Nursing - methods
Risk factors
Surgery
Surgical Instruments - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - methods
Abstract
The surgical team is potentially at risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from the patient. Assuming that the probability of an accidental injury during surgery is 0.01 (P2), the prevalence of HIV is 0.01 (P3) and the seroconversion rate is 0.01 (P1), we have estimated the risk (actuarial model) for a surgeon as 0.2% per year, and 5.82% for 30 years of surgery. In view of this we have made changes in surgical technique to reduce the risk to the surgical team from splash or injury. The surgeon must handle tissue with instruments only and minimize the use of fingers. Whenever possible, sharp instruments should be replaced by a blunt type. The surgical nurse loads needles to the needle carrier using forceps. Sharp instruments are placed in a neutral zone on the nurse's stand so that the surgeon and the nurse never touch the same sharp instrument at the same time. Movements should be controlled, and instrument handling accompanied by eye contact. We consider that these changes will reduce the risk of accidental injuries and thereby the transmission of HIV during operations to a greater degree than knowledge of the patient's HIV status.
PubMed ID
1716276 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215483
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1995 Apr;14(4):275-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
A. Fomsgaard
N. Høiby
H M Friis
B. Gahrn-Hansen
H J Kolmos
P. Schouenborg
B. Korsager
M. Tvede
E. Gutschik
A. Bremmelgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1995 Apr;14(4):275-81
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Cross Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Utilization
Europe
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Hematology
Hospital Departments - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Oncology Service, Hospital
Prevalence
Abstract
The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries. Bacterial isolates from 794 Danish patients were tested and compared to 8,625 isolates from European patients. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight different antibiotics were determined using a microdilution plate. Similar to findings in European countries, the most common source of bacterial isolates in Danish units was the respiratory tract (49%), followed by blood (18%), urinary tract (14%) and surgical wounds (10%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent respiratory organism in Danish units, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated in other countries. In blood, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7649189 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.