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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Aspirin-intolerant asthma in the population: prevalence and important determinants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266365
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
A. Bossios
A. Bjerg
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
J. Lötvall
B. Lundbäck
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma, Aspirin-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Population-based studies on aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) are very few, and no previous population study has investigated risk factors for the condition.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of AIA in the general population.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed to 30,000 randomly selected subjects aged 16-75 years in West Sweden, 29,218 could be traced and 18,087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms, aspirin-induced dyspnoea and possible determinants.
The prevalence of AIA was 0.5%, 0.3% in men and 0.6% in women (P = 0.014). Sick leave, emergency visits due to asthma and all investigated lower respiratory symptoms were more common in AIA than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). Obesity was a strong risk factor for AIA (BMI > 35: odds ratio (OR) 12.1; 95% CI 2.49-58.5), and there was a dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of AIA. Obesity, airborne occupational exposure and visible mould at home were considerably stronger risk factors for AIA than for ATA. Current smoking was a risk factor for AIA (OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.47-4.42), but not ATA.
Aspirin-intolerant asthma identified in the general population was associated with a high burden of symptoms, uncontrolled disease and a high morbidity. Increasing BMI increased the risk of AIA in a dose-response manner. A number of risk factors, including obesity and current smoking, were considerably stronger for AIA than for ATA.
PubMed ID
24961377 View in PubMed
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Asthma in school age: prevalence and risk factors by time and by age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99090
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2 Suppl 1:123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
A. Bjerg
E. Rönmark
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. anders.bjerg@lung.umu.se
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2 Suppl 1:123-6
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Family Health
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Remission, Spontaneous
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood is the most important age for asthma development. Recent reports indicate that the prevalence of asthma in children has plateaued after having increased for decades. AIMS: To study prevalence and risk factor patterns of asthma by age and by time. METHODS: In 1996, all children in grade 1-2 (age 7-8) in three cities in Northern Sweden were invited to an expanded International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. A total of 3430 children (97%) participated yearly until 2000 (age 11-12). A subset (n = 2454) was invited to skin-prick testing in 1996 and 2000 with 88% and 90% participation. In 2006, another cohort (n = 2704) was identified and studied by identical methods with 96% participation. A total of 1700 children (90% of invited) were skin-prick tested. RESULTS AND COMMENTS: From age 7-8 to 11-12, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased, 5.7%-7.7% (P
PubMed ID
20298361 View in PubMed
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Asthma symptoms and nasal congestion as independent risk factors for insomnia in a general population: results from the GA(2)LEN survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118710
Source
Allergy. 2013 Feb;68(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
F. Sundbom
E. Lindberg
A. Bjerg
B. Forsberg
K. Franklin
M. Gunnbjörnsdottir
R. Middelveld
K. Torén
C. Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2013 Feb;68(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Obstruction - diagnosis - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Asthma and rhinitis have been related to insomnia. The aim of this study was to further analyse the association between asthma, nasal symptoms and insomnia and to identify risk factors for sleep disturbance among patients with asthma, in a large population-based set of material.
In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. The questionnaire included questions on insomnia, asthma, rhinitis, weight, height, tobacco use and physical activity.
Twenty-five thousand six hundred and ten subjects participated. Asthma was defined as either current medication for asthma or at least one attack of asthma during the last 12 months, and 1830 subjects (7.15%) were defined as asthmatics. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was significantly higher among asthmatics than non-asthmatics (47.3% vs 37.2%,
PubMed ID
23176562 View in PubMed
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Chronic rhinosinusitis in asthma is a negative predictor of quality of life: results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106793
Source
Allergy. 2013 Oct;68(10):1314-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
A. Ek
R J M Middelveld
H. Bertilsson
A. Bjerg
L. Ekerljung
A. Malinovschi
P. Stjärne
K. Larsson
S E Dahlén
C. Janson
Author Affiliation
Experimental Asthma and Allergy Research Unit, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2013 Oct;68(10):1314-21
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Rhinitis - complications
Risk factors
Sinusitis - complications
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) both impair quality of life, but the quality-of-life impact of comorbid asthma and CRS is poorly known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of CRS and other relevant factors on quality of life in asthmatic subjects.
This Swedish cohort (age 17-76 years) consists of 605 well-characterized asthmatics with and without CRS, 110 individuals with CRS only, and 226 controls and is part of the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2) LEN) survey. The Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ), the Euro Quality of Life (EQ-5D) health questionnaire, spirometry, skin prick test (SPT), exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), smell test, and peak nasal inspiratory flow were used.
Subjects having both asthma and CRS have lower mAQLQ scores in all domains (P 30 kg/m2 (P = 0.04), high age (P = 0.03), and a negative SPT (P = 0.04).
Comorbid CRS was a significant and independent negative predictor of quality of life in asthmatics. Other negative factors were lower lung function, current smoking, obesity, advanced age, and having nonatopic asthma.
PubMed ID
24107218 View in PubMed
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Decreased importance of environmental risk factors for childhood asthma from 1996 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266315
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):146-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
A. Bjerg
L. Hedman
M. Perzanowski
G. Wennergren
B. Lundbäck
E. Rönmark
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):146-53
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cetrimonium Compounds
Child
Drug Combinations
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Myristates
Nicotinic Acids
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Simethicone
Stearic Acids
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The large increase in asthma prevalence continues in several, but not all areas. Despite the individual risk factors that have been identified, the reasons for the observed trends in prevalence are largely unknown.
This study sought to characterize what trends in risk factors accompanied trends in asthma prevalence.
Two population-based cohorts of 7- to 8-year-old children from the same Swedish study areas examined by expanded International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood questionnaires were compared 10 years apart. In 1996 and 2006, 3430 (97% participation) and 2585 (96% participation) questionnaires were completed, respectively. A subset was skin-prick-tested: in 1996 and 2006, 2148 (88% participation) and 1700 (90% participation) children, respectively. The adjusted population-attributable fraction (aPAF) was calculated using the prevalence and multivariate odds ratio of each risk factor.
The prevalence of current asthma and wheeze was similar in 1996 and 2006. Allergic sensitization, however, increased from 21% to 30%. The prevalence of parental asthma increased from 17% to 24%, while respiratory infections and maternal smoking decreased (60% to 29% and 32% to 16%, respectively). The aPAFs of non-environmental risk factors for current asthma increased in 1996-2006: allergic sensitization from 35% to 41%, parental asthma from 27% to 45% and male sex from 20% to 25%. Conversely, the aPAFs of environmental risk factors decreased: respiratory infections from 36% to 32% and damp home and maternal smoking from 14% and 19%, respectively, to near zero in 2006.
From 1996 to 2006, the non-environmental risk factors parental asthma, allergic sensitization and male sex had an increasing or constant importance for current asthma in 7- to 8-year-old children. The importance of the environmental exposures damp home, respiratory infections and maternal smoking decreased. This counterbalancing in risk factors may explain the level of prevalence of current asthma.
PubMed ID
25323476 View in PubMed
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Environmental risk factors related to the incidence of wheeze and asthma in adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266378
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):184-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
L. Hedman
M. Andersson
A. Bjerg
B. Forsberg
B. Lundbäck
E. Rönmark
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):184-91
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cats
Child
Dogs
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Asthma is common among adolescents, but there are few population-based studies on the risk factors for incident asthma and wheeze at this age group.
To study risk factors for incident asthma and wheeze in adolescence.
Within the Obstructive Lung Disease In Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies, a cohort of 3430 school children (age 7-8 year) was recruited in 1996. In the present study, this cohort was followed from age 12-19 year. At baseline (age 12 year), 3151 participated and skin prick tests (SPT) were performed. The cohort was resurveyed annually, and risk factors for the cumulative incidence of asthma and wheeze from age 12-19 year were analysed using multivariate Cox regression.
Female sex (wheeze: HR 1.4 95%CI 1.2-1.6; asthma: HR 1.8 95%CI 1.2-2.5) and a positive SPT to cat, dog or horse at baseline (wheeze: HR 1.6 95%CI 1.2-2.1; asthma: HR 2.3 95%CI 1.4-4.0) were significantly associated with the cumulative incidence of wheeze and asthma. Increasing numbers of siblings were inversely related to the incidence of wheeze (HR 0.9 95%CI 0.8-0.97) and asthma (HR 0.8 95%CI 0.7-0.97). Parental asthma was related to the incidence of asthma (HR 1.8 95%CI 1.2-2.6) while ever smoking (HR 2.0 95%CI 1.6-2.4) and house dampness (HR 1.3 95%CI 1.1-1.6) were risk factors for the incidence of wheeze. Maternal ETS exposure increased the risk of incident asthma in non-sensitized subjects (HR 1.9 95%CI 1.0-3.7).
Several environmental risk factors related to the incidence of asthma and wheeze in adolescence were identified and may be possible targets for intervention and prevention.
PubMed ID
24773259 View in PubMed
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Gas, dust, and fumes exposure is associated with mite sensitization and with asthma in mite-sensitized adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269308
Source
Allergy. 2015 May;70(5):604-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
A. Bjerg
E P Rönmark
S. Hagstad
J. Eriksson
M. Andersson
G. Wennergren
K. Torén
L. Ekerljung
Source
Allergy. 2015 May;70(5):604-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology
Dust
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Mites - immunology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of asthma and eczema. We investigated the role of sensitization in the association between GDF and allergic conditions. A population-based sample of 788 adults from the West Sweden Asthma Study completed questionnaires and skin prick tests. After adjustment for confounders, GDF exposure was associated with a doubled risk of sensitization to mites, but not with other allergens. Mite sensitization also modified the effect of GDF on asthma. In mite-sensitized subjects, GDF was associated with physician-diagnosed asthma, adjusted OR 2.9 (1.2-7.2), and with wheeze, OR 2.4 (1.1-5.3). In non-mite-sensitized subjects, the corresponding ORs were 1.1 (0.5-2.6) and 0.6 (0.3-1.3). GDF was independently associated with eczema regardless of mite sensitization, but not with rhinitis. These novel findings suggest that components of GDF may act as adjuvants that facilitate sensitization to mites and that mite-sensitized individuals may be especially susceptible to inhalant occupational exposures.
PubMed ID
25640536 View in PubMed
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Has risk associated with smoking increased? Results from the Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67599
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;26(6):1214-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
E. Prescott
M. Osler
P K Andersen
A. Bjerg
H O Hein
K. Borch-Johnsen
P. Lange
P. Schnohr
J. Vestbo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;26(6):1214-8
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Two recent much cited publications have raised the concern that risk associated with cigarette smoking has so far been underestimated. In this study we wish to determine whether excess all-cause mortality associated with smoking has increased during the last 20-30 years in a study population representative of the general Danish population and whether any such changes relate to changes in smoking behaviour. METHODS: Pooled data from three prospective population studies conducted in Copenhagen with detailed information on smoking habits. A total of 31,194 subjects, 17,669 males and 13,525 females, initially examined between 1964 and 1992 with examinations repeated at intervals from 1-10 years, were followed until 1995 for all-cause mortality. Relative mortality risk in smokers versus never-smokers was calculated within periods of five calendar years and compared throughout the study period. RESULTS: Male smokers' exposure did not change during the study period whereas female smokers' exposure to tobacco increased in terms of age at smoking onset, quantity smoked and depth of inhalation. During follow-up 5744 males and 2900 females died. In males, death rate ratios (comparing continuous smokers with never-smokers) did not change in the study period. In females, ratios increased from 1964-1978 to 1979-1994 by a factor of 1.3 (95% confidence interval 1.0-1.8). CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with the observed changes in smoking habits, excess mortality in male smokers did not increase whereas excess mortality in female smokers increased slightly.
PubMed ID
9447400 View in PubMed
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High incidence and persistence of airborne allergen sensitization up to age 19 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287529
Source
Allergy. 2017 May;72(5):723-730
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
E. Rönmark
K. Warm
A. Bjerg
H. Backman
L. Hedman
B. Lundbäck
Source
Allergy. 2017 May;72(5):723-730
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Immunization
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Pollen
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Skin Tests
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Longitudinal population-based studies about the natural history of allergic sensitization are rare. The aim was to study incidence and persistence of airborne allergen sensitization up to young adulthood and risk factors for early and late onset of sensitization.
All children aged 7-8 years in two municipalities in Northern Sweden were invited to a parental questionnaire and skin prick tests (SPTs) to ten airborne allergens, and 2148 (88%) participated. The protocol was repeated at age 11-12 and 19 years, and 1516 participated in all three examinations.
Prevalence of any positive SPT increased from 20.6% at age 7-8 years to 30.6% at 11-12 years, and 42.1% at 19 years. Animals were the primary sensitizers at age 7-8 years, 16.3%, followed by pollen, 12.4%. Mite and mold sensitization was low. Mean annual incidence of any positive SPT varied between 2.8 and 3.4/100 per year, decreased by age for animal, and was stable for pollen. Sensitization before age 7-8 years was independently associated with family history of allergy, OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.6-2.8), urban living, OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.9), and male sex, OR 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.7), and negatively associated with birth order, OR 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-1.0), and furry animals at home, OR 0.7 (95% CI 0.7-0.9). Incidence after age 11-12 years was associated only with family history of allergy. Multisensitization at age 19 years was significantly associated with early age at sensitization. Remission of sensitization was uncommon.
The increasing prevalence of allergic sensitization by age was explained by high incidence and persistence. After age 11-12 years, the factors urban living, number of siblings, and male sex lost their importance.
PubMed ID
27659134 View in PubMed
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Important non-disease-related determinants of exhaled nitric oxide levels in mild asthma - results from the Swedish GA(2) LEN study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287888
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2016 Sep;46(9):1185-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
N. Al-Shamkhi
K. Alving
S E Dahlen
G. Hedlin
R. Middelveld
A. Bjerg
L. Ekerljung
A C Olin
J. Sommar
B. Forsberg
C. Janson
A. Malinovschi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2016 Sep;46(9):1185-93
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - metabolism
Biomarkers
Body Weights and Measures
Comorbidity
Exhalation
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - metabolism
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Menstrual Cycle
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Pollen
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Spirometry
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has a potential clinical role in asthma management. Constitutive factors such as age, height and gender, as well as individual characteristics, such as IgE sensitization and smoking, affect the levels of FeNO in population-based studies. However, their effect on FeNO in subjects with asthma has been scarcely studied.
To study the effects on FeNO of these commonly regarded determinants, as demonstrated in healthy subjects, as well as menarche age and parental smoking, in a population of asthmatics.
Fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured in 557 subjects with asthma from the Swedish GA(2) LEN study. Allergic sensitization was assessed by skin prick tests to most common aeroallergens. Upper airway comorbidities, smoking habits, smoking exposure during childhood and hormonal status (for women) were questionnaire-assessed.
Male gender (P
PubMed ID
27138350 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.