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Reduction in osteomyelitis and septic arthritis related to Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200223
Source
J Pediatr Orthop. 1999 Nov-Dec;19(6):705-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A W Howard
D. Viskontas
C. Sabbagh
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and University of Ottawa, Canada. andrew.howard@ibm.net
Source
J Pediatr Orthop. 1999 Nov-Dec;19(6):705-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Arthritis, Infectious - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Haemophilus Infections - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Haemophilus influenzae type b - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Osteomyelitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This retrospective cohort study compares organisms responsible for septic arthritis and osteomyelitis before and after Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination. Before vaccination, Haemophilus influenzae type b was responsible for 5% of culture positive osteomyelitis and 41% of culture positive septic arthritis. Since the administration of the conjugated vaccine PRP-T began in 1992, no case of osteomyelitis or septic arthritis has been caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (p
PubMed ID
10573336 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;46(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A H Thompson
A W Howard
Y. Jin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, 13-103 Clinical Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G3. gus.thompson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;46(1):45-51
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Social Problems - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To construct an index that represents the general level of social problems among Canadian provinces and territories.
Factor weights were used to combine provincial and territorial rates for homicide, attempted murder, assault, sexual assault, robbery, divorce, suicide, and alcoholism into a single Social Problem Index.
The resulting index demonstrated strong positive intercorrelations among its factors across provinces. That is, provinces that showed high rates on one factor tended to show high rates on the others as well. The validity of the Social Problem Index is demonstrated by its positive correlation with an independent measure of the likelihood of having experienced personal trauma.
The robust nature and apparent validity of the Social Problem Index suggest that it can be well used for needs assessments and theoretical studies and as a feedback mechanism to national, provincial, and community leaders on the social problem status of their particular jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
11221489 View in PubMed
Less detail