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Brief communication: the Thule migration: rejecting population histories using computer simulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163017
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Oct;134(2):281-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
E E Marchani
A R Rogers
D H O'Rourke
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. liz.marchani@anthro.utah.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2007 Oct;134(2):281-4
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer simulation
DNA, Mitochondrial
Emigration and Immigration
Haplotypes
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics - history
Models, Biological
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Abstract
Locked within our genetic code are the histories of our genes and the genes of our ancestors. Deciphering a population's history from genetic data often involves lengthy investigations of many loci for many individuals. We test hypothetical population histories of the Thule expansion using a new coalescent simulation method that uses little more than mitochondrial haplogroup data. This new methodology rejects a severe bottleneck at expansion and reveals the range of probable population histories on which to focus future research.
PubMed ID
17568448 View in PubMed
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The effect of non-random migration on genetic differences between populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235204
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 1987 May;51(Pt 2):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987
Author
A R Rogers
L B Jorde
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 1987 May;51(Pt 2):169-76
Date
May-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Gene Pool
Genetics, Population
Humans
Models, Genetic
Probability
Statistics as Topic
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
Models of genetic population structure generally assume that emigrants from each local group are drawn at random from the set of individuals born there. We show that small violations of this assumption can have disproportionately large effects on genetic population structure, and we introduce a statistical method for measuring this effect.
PubMed ID
3674757 View in PubMed
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Source
Hum Biol. 1994 Feb;66(1):49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
E J Manderscheid
J A Brannan
A R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112.
Source
Hum Biol. 1994 Feb;66(1):49-57
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Bias (epidemiology)
Emigration and Immigration
Family
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Humans
Macaca mulatta - genetics
Male
Models, Genetic
Papua New Guinea
Phenotype
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
We estimate the strength of kin-structured migration in six human populations (five from New Guinea and one from Finland) and in one population of nonhuman primates. We also test the hypothesis that migration is not kin structured by generating a sampling distribution of the estimator under the null hypothesis of independent random migration. We are unable to detect a statistically significant level of kin-structured migration in any population. However, five of our six human populations were from Papua New Guinea, and we cannot dismiss the possibility that migration is kin structured in other parts of the world.
PubMed ID
8157264 View in PubMed
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