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Cross border reproductive care in six European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97545
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Jun;25(6):1361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
F. Shenfield
J. de Mouzon
G. Pennings
A P Ferraretti
A Nyboe Andersen
G. de Wert
V. Goossens
Author Affiliation
Reproductive Medecine Unit, New EGA, UCLH, Euston Road, London NW1 2BU, UK. mfi@easynet.co.uk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Jun;25(6):1361-8
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The quantity and the reasons for seeking cross border reproductive care are unknown. The present article provides a picture of this activity in six selected European countries receiving patients. METHODS: Data were collected from 46 ART centres, participating voluntarily in six European countries receiving cross border patients. All treated patients treated in these centres during one calendar month filled out an individual questionnaire containing their major socio-demographic characteristics, the treatment sought and their reasons for seeking treatment outside their country of residence. RESULTS: In total, 1230 forms were obtained from the six countries: 29.7% from Belgium, 20.5% from Czech Republic, 12.5% from Denmark, 5.3% from Slovenia, 15.7% from Spain and 16.3% from Switzerland. Patients originated from 49 different countries. Among the cross border patients participating, almost two-thirds came from four countries: Italy (31.8%), Germany (14.4%), The Netherlands (12.1%) and France (8.7%). The mean age of the participants was 37.3 years for all countries (range 21-51 years), 69.9% were married and 90% were heterosexual. Their reasons for crossing international borders for treatment varied by countries of origin: legal reasons were predominant for patients travelling from Italy (70.6%), Germany (80.2%), France (64.5%), Norway (71.6%) and Sweden (56.6%). Better access to treatment than in country of origin was more often noted for UK patients (34.0%) than for other nationalities. Quality was an important factor for patients from most countries. CONCLUSIONS: The cross border phenomenon is now well entrenched. The data show that many patients travel to evade restrictive legislation in their own country, and that support from their home health providers is variable. There may be a need for professional societies to establish standards for cross border reproductive care.
PubMed ID
20348165 View in PubMed
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A Danish national cohort of 730 infants born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) 1994-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33222
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Aug;14(8):2143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A. Loft
K. Petersen
K. Erb
A L Mikkelsen
J. Grinsted
F. Hald
J. Hindkjaer
K M Nielsen
P. Lundstrom
A. Gabrielsen
S. Lenz
P. Hornnes
S. Ziebe
H B Ejdrup
A. Lindhard
Y. Zhou
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Aug;14(8):2143-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Insemination, Artificial
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This national cohort study included all clinical pregnancies obtained after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) registered in Denmark between January 1994 and July 1997 at five public and eight private fertility clinics. Laboratory and clinical data were obtained from the fertility clinics. The couples answered a questionnaire regarding the pregnancy and the health of the child (response rate 94%). Data validation was carried out through discharge charts. The mean age of the women was 32.1 years. In 84.2% of couples, male factor was the main reason for performing ICSI, and in 4.8% epididymal spermatozoa were used. The mean number of embryos replaced was 2.3 (range 1-3) and in 95% of cases fresh embryos were transferred. Only 183 women (28.5%) underwent prenatal diagnosis, resulting in 209 karyotypes with seven (3.3%) chromosome aberrations. Six major chromosomal abnormalities (2.9%) and one inherited structural chromosome aberration (0.5%) were found, but no sex chromosome aberrations. The frequency of multiple birth, Caesarean section rate, gestational age, preterm birth, and birth weight were comparable with previous studies. The perinatal mortality rate was 13.7 per 1000 children born with a gestational age of 24 weeks or more. In 2.2% (n = 16) of the liveborn infants, and in 2.7% (n = 20) of all infants, major birth defects were reported by the parents. Minor birth defects were found in nine liveborn infants (1.2%). In conclusion, the results of this study on outcome of ICSI pregnancies are in line with earlier reports, except that no sex chromosome abnormalities were found.
PubMed ID
10438441 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70655
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Dec;59(3):252-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
L. Schmidt
T. Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
J. Boivin
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Panum Institute, 3 Blegdamsvej, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. L.Schmidt@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Dec;59(3):252-62
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Communication
Curriculum
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infertility - complications - psychology
Male
Marriage - psychology
Patient Education - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouses - education - psychology
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment. METHODS: In total, 37 couples completed the intervention. Two teachers conducted all the five courses offered. The effectiveness regarding communication and infertility-related stress was assessed by questionnaires immediately before (time T1) and after the intervention (time T2). Seeking of information and professional support was assessed at a 12-month follow-up (time T3); response rates were: T1, 93.2%; T2, 85.1%; T3, 74.3%. Data were compared at baseline (T1) and at the 12-month follow-up (T3) with a prospective cohort of Danish people in fertility treatment. RESULTS: There were no differences in infertility-related stress at base line between the two groups studied. We estimated the bi-directional changes in communication, e.g., changes from talking often to talking less frequently and vice versa. More intervention participants started to talk often with their partner about infertility and its treatment after the intervention compared to those who stopped to talk often. Women and men changed occurrence, frequency and content of communication with close other people. Among women marital benefit increased significantly. Infertility-related stress was not reduced significantly. Significantly more intervention participants than in the comparison group had contacted support groups, a psychologist and/or agencies for adoption at the 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: The intervention resulted in important perceived improvement in the participants' competence to actively manage changes in marital communication and in communication in different social arenas. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: We recommend fertility clinics to develop and evaluate different interventions for those fertility couples who ask for more psychosocial support.
PubMed ID
15990268 View in PubMed
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Hereditary thrombophilia and recurrent pregnancy loss: a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcome and obstetric complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140148
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Dec;25(12):2978-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
M. Lund
H S Nielsen
T V Hviid
R. Steffensen
A. Nyboe Andersen
O B Christiansen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic 4071, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mlund@dadlnet.dk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Dec;25(12):2978-84
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Habitual - genetics
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adult
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Factor V - genetics
Female
Humans
Mutation
Obstetric Labor Complications - genetics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - genetics
Prognosis
Prothrombin - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Thrombophilia - drug therapy - genetics
Abstract
The association among hereditary thrombophilia, recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and obstetric complications is yet uncertain. The objective of the study was to assess the prognostic value of the factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PT) mutations for the subsequent chance of live birth for women with RPL.
Pregnancy outcome was recorded in a retrospective cohort of 363 women with a minimum of three consecutive pregnancy losses (early miscarriage, late miscarriage or stillbirth/neonatal death) who were not treated with anticoagulation therapy.
Of the 363 women, 29 were FVL-mutation carriers and 6 were PT-mutation carriers. The unadjusted live birth rate was 45.7% in FVL/PT carriers versus 63.4% in FVL/PT non-carriers, P = 0.04. The adjusted odds ratio for live birth in FVL/PT carriers was 0.48 (95% CI = 0.23-1.01), P = 0.05. Among the obstetric complications, only excessive bleeding was found to be associated with FVL/PT mutations.
In the unadjusted analysis, FVL and PT mutations have a negative prognostic impact on the live birth rate in women with RPL; however, when adjusting for significant covariates, the results no longer reach statistical significance. Strong conclusions on the association between obstetric complications and hereditary thrombophilia cannot be drawn from this study. Whether anticoagulation therapy would improve the prognosis in women with RPL and FVL/PT mutations remains to be documented in large randomized controlled trials.
PubMed ID
20937743 View in PubMed
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Heterotopic pregnancies after in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer--a Danish survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64865
Source
Hum Reprod. 1993 Jan;8(1):116-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
J. Svare
P. Norup
S. Grove Thomsen
P. Hornnes
S. Maigaard
P. Helm
K. Petersen
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Herlev Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 1993 Jan;8(1):116-8
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryo Transfer - adverse effects
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Thirteen cases of heterotopic pregnancy were diagnosed among 1171 pregnancies established in Denmark after in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). Thus the frequency of heterotopic pregnancy was 13/1171 or 1.1%. In five cases the diagnosis of heterotopic pregnancy was made by ultrasound at 6-9 weeks of gestation; three of these patients were asymptomatic, while two patients presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. All these patients had an unruptured ectopic pregnancy. Eight cases were diagnosed at the time of surgery; all these patients presented with abdominal pain. Only two of the 13 patients had vaginal bleeding. In nine of the 13 cases the intra-uterine pregnancy resulted in term delivery, while one pregnancy is ongoing. In pregnancies following IVF-ET, this diagnosis should particularly be considered in cases with abdominal pain; vaginal bleeding may be absent. Ultrasound examination may lead to early diagnosis even in asymptomatic cases. In most cases, removal of the ectopic gestation will allow the intrauterine pregnancy to proceed to term.
PubMed ID
8458912 View in PubMed
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High ratings of satisfaction with fertility treatment are common: findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52074
Source
Hum Reprod. 2003 Dec;18(12):2638-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
L. Schmidt
B E Holstein
J. Boivin
T. Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
J. Blaabjerg
F. Hald
P E Rasmussen
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Panum Institute, Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. L.Schmidt@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2003 Dec;18(12):2638-46
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility - psychology - therapy
Infertility, Male - psychology - therapy
Male
Marriage - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Stress, Psychological
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aims were: (i). to identify gender differences in evaluation of medical and patient-centred (psychosocial) care in fertility clinics and (ii). to identify predictors of satisfaction. METHODS: An epidemiological prospective study based on questionnaire responses among all new couples attending five fertility clinics. The response rate at the 12 month follow-up was 87.7% and included a total of 1934 patients. RESULTS: During the follow-up period about two-thirds had achieved a pregnancy and about a third became parents. The participants were satisfied with both the medical and patient-centred (psychosocial) services. There were no sex differences in the evaluation of treatment except that women were more satisfied than men with how the staff had performed their medical examinations. Satisfaction with medical and patient-centred services was positively associated with a treatment-related pregnancy/delivery and the report of marital benefits resulting from the infertility experience. Lower social class was a significant predictor for satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Both men and women in fertility treatment had high ratings on medical and patient-centred care. It seemed that satisfaction with the psychosocial services was higher than in earlier studies from other countries.
PubMed ID
14645185 View in PubMed
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Impact of recombinant FSH dose adjustments on ovarian response in the second treatment cycle with IVF or ICSI in "standard" patients treated with 150 IU/day during the first cycle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63343
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):842-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
B. Popovic-Todorovic
A. Loft
S. Ziebe
A Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. drbiba@yahoo.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):842-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - drug effects - methods
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human - administration & dosage
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Maternal Age
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Oocytes - drug effects
Ovulation Induction - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Probability
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - drug effects - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A dose of 150 IU/day of recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) is commonly used as a "standard" dose for "standard" patients in the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment cycle. In the second cycle, the starting dose is adjusted in those patients who had an inappropriate response during the first cycle. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of dose adjustments on ovarian response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study including 567 first IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles using the long agonist protocol in "standard" patients. In the second cycle 385 patients who had failed to achieve an ongoing pregnancy were included. The starting dose in the second cycle was adjusted according to the response in the first cycle. RESULTS: A total of 215 patients (55.8%) had altered starting dose in the second cycle: 193 (50.1%) received >150 IU/day, whereas 22 (5.7%) had 150 IU/day, significantly more follicles (9.8 vs. 8.3, p = 0.002) and oocytes (8.4 vs. 6.7, p
PubMed ID
15315596 View in PubMed
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Infertile women below the age of 40 have similar anti-Müllerian hormone levels and antral follicle count compared with women of the same age with no history of infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279139
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
H W Hvidman
J G Bentzen
L L Thuesen
M P Lauritsen
J L Forman
A. Loft
A. Pinborg
A. Nyboe Andersen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - metabolism
Ovarian Follicle - diagnostic imaging
Ovarian Reserve
Ovulation Induction
Abstract
Do infertile patients below the age of 40 years have a lower ovarian reserve, estimated by anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and total antral follicle count (AFC), than women of the same age with no history of infertility?
Serum AMH and AFC were not lower in infertile patients aged 20-39 years compared with a control group of the same age with no history of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY?: The management of patients with a low ovarian reserve and a poor response to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) remains a challenge in assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Both AMH levels and AFC reflect the ovarian reserve and are valuable predictors of the ovarian response to exogenous gonadotrophins. However, there is a large inter-individual variation in the age-related depletion of the ovarian reserve and a broad variability in the levels of AMH and AFC compatible with conception. Women with an early depletion of the ovarian reserve may experience infertility as a consequence of postponement of childbearing. Thus, low ovarian reserve is considered to be overrepresented among infertile patients.
A prospective cohort study including 382 women with a male partner referred to fertility treatment at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark during 2011-2013 compared with a control group of 350 non-users of hormonal contraception with no history of infertility recruited during 2008-2010.
Included patients and controls were aged 20-39 years. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome were excluded. On Cycle Days 2-5, AFC and ovarian volume were measured by transvaginal sonography, and serum levels of AMH, FSH and LH were assessed.
Infertile patients had similar AMH levels (11%, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1;24%) and AFC (1%, 95% CI: -7;8%) compared with controls with no history of infertility in an age-adjusted linear regression analysis. The prevalence of very low AMH levels (
PubMed ID
26965431 View in PubMed
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[Infertility in ethnic groups. Etiology and treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63908
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 7;162(32):4258-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-2000
Author
B S Hassan Hamid
S. Ziebe
A. Loft
A. Lindhard
H E Bredkjaer
A. Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, Juliane Marie Centret, fertilitetsklinikken. amsi@wanadoo.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 7;162(32):4258-61
Date
Aug-7-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - ethnology
English Abstract
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infertility - ethnology - etiology - therapy
Male
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In this retrospective case control study we analysed the causes and treatments of infertility in 100 ethnic couples consecutively discharged from the Fertility Clinic in the period October 1995 to March 1999. The mean age at referral was 28 years (19-37) for ethnic women and 31 years (24-39) for Danish women. Male infertility was the most frequent cause in ethnic couples compared to Danish couples (24% vs. 16%; NS). Tubal infertility was less frequent in ethnic than in Danish couples (19% vs. 45%; p
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 9;162(41):552211068537
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 9;162(41):552211068536
PubMed ID
10962943 View in PubMed
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Large baby syndrome in singletons born after frozen embryo transfer (FET): is it due to maternal factors or the cryotechnique?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256879
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Mar;29(3):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
A. Pinborg
A A Henningsen
A. Loft
S S Malchau
J. Forman
A Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kettegaard Allé 30, Hvidovre DK-2650, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Mar;29(3):618-27
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cryopreservation - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryo Transfer - adverse effects - methods
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Abstract
Are singletons born after frozen embryo transfer (FET) at increased risk of being born large for gestational age (LGA) and if so, is this caused by intrinsic maternal factors or related to the freezing/thawing procedures?
Singletons after FET have an increased risk of being born LGA. This cannot solely be explained by intrinsic maternal factors as it was also observed in sibling pairs, where the sibling conceived after FET had an increased risk of LGA compared with the sibling born after Fresh embryo transfer.
FET singletons have a higher mean birthweight than singletons born after transfer of fresh embryos, and FET singletons may be at an increased risk of being born LGA.
The national register-based controlled cohort study involves two populations of FET singletons. The first population (A: total FET cohort) consisted of all FET singletons (n = 896) compared with singletons born after Fresh embryo transfer (Fresh) (n = 9480) and also with that born after natural conception (NC; n = 4510) in Denmark from 1997 to 2006. The second population (B: Sibling FET cohort) included all sibling pairs, where one singleton was born after FET and the consecutive sibling born after Fresh embryo transfer or vice versa from 1994 to 2008 (n = 666). The sibling cohort included n = 550 children with the sibling combination first child Fresh/second child FET and n = 116 children with the combination first child FET/second child Fresh.
Main outcome measures were LGA defined as birthweight of >2 SD from the population mean (z-score >2) according to Mars?ls curves. Macrosomia was defined as birthweight of >4500 g. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of LGA and macrosomia were calculated for FET versus Fresh and versus NC singletons in the total FET cohort. Similarly, AOR was calculated for FET versus Fresh in the sibling cohort. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity, child sex, year of birth and birth order in the sibling analyses. Meta-analyses were performed by pooling our data with the previously published cohort studies on LGA and macrosomia.
The AORs of LGA (z-score >2) and macrosomia in FET singletons versus singletons conceived after Fresh embryo transfer were 1.34 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.98-1.80] and 1.91 (95% CI 1.40-2.62), respectively. The corresponding risks for FET versus NC singletons were 1.41 (95% CI 1.01-1.98) for LGA and 1.67 (95% CI 1.18-2.37) for macrosomia. The increased risk of LGA and macrosomia in FET singletons was confirmed in the sibling cohort also after adjustment for birth order. Hence, the increased risk of LGA in FET singletons cannot solely be explained by being the second born or by intrinsic maternal factors, but may also partly be related to freezing/thawing procedures per se. In the meta-analysis, the summary effects of LGA and macrosomia in FET versus singletons conceived after Fresh embryo transfer were AOR 1.54 (95% CI 1.31-1.81) and AOR 1.64 (95% CI 1.26-2.12), respectively. The corresponding figures for FET versus NC singletons were for LGA AOR 1.32 (95% CI 1.07-1.61) and macrosomia AOR 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.80), respectively.
Adjustment for body mass index as a possible confounder was not possible. The size of the FET/Fresh sibling cohort was limited; however, the complete sibling cohort was sufficiently powered to explore the risk of LGA. A bias is very unlikely as data coding was based on national registers.
Our findings are consistent with the previous Nordic studies and thus can be generalized to the Nordic countries. The causes for LGA in FET singletons should be further explored.
No external funding was used for this project. None of the authors have any conflict of interest to declare.
PubMed ID
24413766 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.