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Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43,000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261630
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
A J Søgaard
K. Holvik
T K Omsland
G S Tell
C. Dahl
B. Schei
J A Falch
J A Eisman
H E Meyer
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The question as to whether abdominal obesity has an adverse effect on hip fracture remains unanswered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index with incident hip fracture.
The data in this prospective study is based on Cohort of Norway, a population-based cohort established during 1994-2003. Altogether 19,918 women and 23,061 men aged 60-79 years were followed for a median of 8.1 years. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline using standard procedures. Information on covariates was collected by questionnaires. Hip fractures (n = 1,498 in women, n = 889 in men) were identified from electronic discharge registers from all general hospitals in Norway between 1994 and 2008.
The risk of hip fracture decreased with increasing body mass index, plateauing in obese men. However, higher waist circumference and higher waist-hip ratio were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders. Women in the highest tertile of waist circumference had an 86% (95% CI: 51-129%) higher risk of hip fracture compared to the lowest, with a corresponding increased risk in men of 100% (95% CI 53-161%). Lower body mass index combined with abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture considerably, particularly in men.
Abdominal obesity was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture when body mass index was taken into account. In view of the increasing prevalence of obesity and the number of older people suffering osteoporotic fractures in Western societies, our findings have important clinical and public health implications.
PubMed ID
24597977 View in PubMed
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[A review of Norwegian studies--how much do we exercise during our leisure time?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32369
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 20;120(28):3439-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2000
Author
A J Søgaard
K. Bø
M. Klungland
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Senter for forebyggende medisin Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. a.j.sogaard@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 20;120(28):3439-46
Date
Nov-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Low levels of physical activity is associated with major health problems. However, no overview of the level of physical activity outside work or school in Norway has been made, which is important in order to implement targeted interventions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Based on published as well as unpublished data, we present data on physical activity in Norway--among children and adolescents, adults and elderly people. RESULTS: Results from different studies differ markedly. However, the main findings are these: The level of physical activity increases in childhood up until about 13 years of age. Approximately 70% of adolescents are active two hours or more a week beyond school-hours. The proportion of physical active youngsters then decreases towards young adulthood. Adults and elderly people get more inactive with increasing age. Data on physical activity from the past 10-15 years suggest a slight increase in the proportion of moderately active Norwegians. INTERPRETATION: Research on physical activity is impeded by the fact that different studies have operationalized physical activity differently and used different age grouping. There is a need for surveys in representative samples with standardised and validated questions, with uniform age classification, covering the full spectre of physical activity. In addition, we need smaller studies with more comprehensive measures of physical activity in Norway.
PubMed ID
11187202 View in PubMed
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The association between alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture differs by age and gender in Cohort of Norway: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299340
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
A J Søgaard
A H Ranhoff
H E Meyer
T K Omsland
W Nystad
G S Tell
K Holvik
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. anne.johanne.sogaard@fhi.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and hip fracture differed by gender: Men aged 30-59 years drinking frequently or 14+ gl/week had higher risk than moderate drinkers. No significant association was seen in older men. Women not drinking alcohol had higher risk than those drinking moderately both regarding frequency and amount.
We aimed to examine alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture according to age and gender in the population-based Cohort of Norway (1994-2003).
Socio-demographics, lifestyle, and health were self-reported and weight and height were measured in 70,568 men and 71,357 women =?30 years. Information on subsequent hip fractures was retrieved from hospitals' electronic patient registries during 1994-2013. Frequency of alcohol consumption was categorized: never/seldom, moderate (=?2-3 times/week), or frequent (=?4 times/week), and amount as number of glasses per week: 0, 1-6, 7-13, 14-27, and 28+. Type of alcohol (wine vs. beer/hard liquor) was also examined. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) stratified on gender and baseline age
PubMed ID
30006884 View in PubMed
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Change in the use of hormone replacement therapy and the incidence of fracture in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99105
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2009 May;20(5):827-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
H E Meyer
C M Lofthus
A J Søgaard
J A Falch
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. h.e.meyer@medisin.uio.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2009 May;20(5):827-30
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Hip Fractures - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hormone Replacement Therapy - trends
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Radius Fractures - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Fracture incidence in Oslo decreased from the 1970s to the 1990s in younger postmenopausal women, but not in older women or in men. Concurrently, hormone replacement therapy increased considerably. Using data from the Oslo Health Study, we estimated that roughly half the decline might be attributed hormone replacement therapy. INTRODUCTION: Between the late 1970s and the late 1990s, the incidence of hip fracture and distal forearm fracture decreased in younger postmenopausal women in Oslo, but not in elderly women or in men. The purpose of this report is to evaluate whether the decreased incidence was coherent with trends in use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). METHODS: Data on estrogens were collected from official drug statistics, data on fractures from published studies and data on bone mineral density (BMD) from the Oslo Health Study. RESULTS: The sale of all estrogens increased 22 times from 1979 to 1999, and the sub-category estradiol combined with progestin increased 35 times. In the corresponding period the incidence of distal forearm fracture in women aged 50-64 years decreased by 33% and hip fracture by 39%. Based on differences in BMD between users and non-users of HRT, we estimated that up to half of this decline might be due to HRT. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in fracture incidence in postmenopausal women in Oslo occurred in a period with a substantial increase in the use of HRT. Future surveillance will reveal whether the last years' decline in use of HRT will be translated into increasing fracture rates.
PubMed ID
18563511 View in PubMed
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A combination of low serum concentrations of vitamins K1 and D is associated with increased risk of hip fractures in elderly Norwegians: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278154
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1645-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
T E Finnes
C M Lofthus
H E Meyer
A J Søgaard
G S Tell
E M Apalset
C. Gjesdal
G. Grimnes
B. Schei
R. Blomhoff
S O Samuelsen
K. Holvik
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1645-52
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Vitamin K 1 - blood
Vitamin K Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study investigated the risk of incident hip fractures according to serum concentrations of vitamin K1 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in elderly Norwegians during long-term follow-up. The results showed that the combination of low concentrations of both vitamin D and K1 provides a significant risk factor for hip fractures.
This case-cohort study aims to investigate the associations between serum vitamin K1 and hip fracture and the possible effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) on this association.
The source cohort was 21,774 men and women aged 65 to 79 years who attended Norwegian community-based health studies during 1994-2001. Hip fractures were identified through hospital registers during median follow-up of 8.2 years. Vitamins were determined in serum obtained at baseline in all hip fracture cases (n?=?1090) and in a randomly selected subcohort (n?=?1318). Cox proportional hazards regression with quartiles of serum vitamin K1 as explanatory variable was performed. Analyses were further performed with the following four groups as explanatory variable: I: vitamin K1?=?0.76 and 25(OH)D?=?50 nmol/l, II: vitamin K1?=?0.76 and 25(OH)D?
PubMed ID
26630974 View in PubMed
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Communication about dental health in Norwegian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62896
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Apr;19(2):68-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
J. Rise
A J Sögaard
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Apr;19(2):68-71
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Communication
Dental Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Female
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Norway
Oral Health
Patient Education
Sex Factors
Abstract
The present study describes the amount and distribution of communication on dental health issues in Norwegian adults. The empirical data stem from a representative sample of Norwegians aged 15 and above, and were collected by means of personal interviews by the poll organization Norges Markedsdata in 1983. Edentulous subjects were excluded, and the study group finally comprised 1225 subjects. The dependent variable - dental communication - was a dichotomy based upon whether or not the respondents had communicated with friends about dental health during the last 6 months. The following independent variables were used: age, sex, marital status, education, use of dental services, number of teeth, knowledge of prevention, information about dental health from dentists and media, use of dental floss and toothpicks. The empirical analysis was performed using contingency table analysis and Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA). Separate analyses were performed for men and women. Significantly more women (27.6%) than men (14.5%) reported dental communication. In addition, the model provided a better fit to the data on women compared to men in terms of R2 (12.5% and 8.9%). These observations can to some extent be accounted for by the existing sex-role pattern. The only predictor which showed a consistent direct effect across sex was whether the respondents had received information about dental health from media. This means that reference to the interpersonal context of mass communication perhaps best describes the complex transactional interplay of media and interpersonal sources in dental health matters.
PubMed ID
2049925 View in PubMed
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Compliance with external hip protectors in nursing homes in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51930
Source
Inj Prev. 2004 Dec;10(6):344-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
L. Forsén
S. Sandvig
A. Schuller
A J Søgaard
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Inj Prev. 2004 Dec;10(6):344-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - prevention & control
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Protective Devices - utilization
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate compliance with hip protector use. DESIGN: Observational prospective study. SETTING: 19 nursing homes (1040 beds). SUBJECTS: All residents during an 18 month period were included in this study. INTERVENTION: Hip protectors were introduced as a regular part of health care service for all residents. Residents at high risk were encouraged to use hip protectors regularly. Each nursing home had a contact person. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The percentage of residents accepting the hip protector offer, probability of continued use, reasons for terminating use, and percentage of falls with hip protector were evaluated. RESULTS: Fifty five percent of the residents accepted the hip protector offer. The percentage increased by age, but showed no significant dependence on gender, profession of the contact person, or size of nursing home. The probability of continued use showed no significant dependence on age and gender. Nursing homes with a nurse as contact person showed 51% higher risk of residents terminating regular hip protector use than nursing homes with a physiotherapist as contact person (relative risk (RR) 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11 to 2.05, p = 0.008). The corresponding result for large (75-92 beds) compared with small (24-68 beds) nursing homes was RR = 1.44 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.02, p = 0.036). Seventy six percent of 2323 falls occurred while using hip protectors. CONCLUSION: The contact person and size of the nursing home seemed to be important factors for continued use of hip protectors while age and gender seemed to be less important.
PubMed ID
15583255 View in PubMed
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Continued decline in hip fracture incidence in Norway: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290794
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 07; 27(7):2217-2222
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2016
Author
A J Søgaard
K Holvik
H E Meyer
G S Tell
C G Gjesdal
N Emaus
G Grimnes
B Schei
S Forsmo
T K Omsland
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403, Oslo, Norway. anne.johanne.sogaard@fhi.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 07; 27(7):2217-2222
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Forecasting
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
The previously reported decline in age-adjusted hip fracture rates in Norway during 1999-2008 continued after 2008. The annual number of hip fractures decreased in women and increased in men.
Norway has among the highest hip fracture incidence rates ever reported despite previously observed declining rates from 1999 through 2008. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this downward trend continued through 2013, and to compare gender-specific trends in 5 year age-groups during three time periods: 1999-2003, 2004-2008, and 2009-2013.
All hip fractures (cervical, trochanteric, and sub-trochanteric) admitted to Norwegian hospitals were retrieved. Annual age-standardized incidence rates of hip fracture per 10,000 person-years by gender were calculated for the period 1999-2013. Time trends were tested by age-adjusted Poisson regression.
From 1999 through 2013 there were 140,136 hip fractures in persons aged 50 years and above. Age-adjusted hip fracture incidence rates declined by 20.4 % (95 % CI: 18.6-20.1) in women and 10.8 % (95 % CI: 7.8-13.8) in men, corresponding to an average annual age-adjusted decline of 1.5 % in women and 0.8 % in men. Except for the oldest men, hip fracture rates declined in all age-groups 70 years and older. The average annual number of fractures decreased in women (-0.3 %) and increased in men (+1.1 %).
During the past 15 years, hip fracture rates have declined in Norway. The forecasted growing number of older individuals might, however, cause an increase in the absolute number of fractures, with a substantial societal economic and public health burden.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26902091 View in PubMed
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[Dental care for patients under home health care. Experience with a trial in the community of Tromsø. Study of demands and treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75896
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1981 Jan;91(1):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981

51 records – page 1 of 6.