Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Antidepressant use and colorectal cancer risk: a Danish population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140416
Source
Br J Cancer. 2011 Jan 4;104(1):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2011
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
A H Riis
T L Lash
S O Dalton
S. Friis
D. Robertson
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Alle 43-45, 8200, Aarhus N, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2011 Jan 4;104(1):188-92
Date
Jan-4-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - chemically induced
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Earlier research suggests that use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but not tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).
We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between antidepressant use and CRC risk. Cases were diagnosed with a first primary CRC from 1991 through 2008. We selected 10 population controls matched to cases on sex, birth year, and residence from the Danish Civil Registration System using risk-set sampling. We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associating antidepressant use with colorectal cancer occurrence, controlling for potential confounders.
The study included 9,979 cases and 99,790 controls. We found no notable reduction in CRC risk in ever users (=2 prescriptions) of TCAs (OR=0.94; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.05), SSRIs (OR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.05), or other antidepressants (OR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.83, 1.07). Associations for recent and former use of antidepressants were also near null. Intensity of antidepressant use (number of pills divided by total duration of use), regardless of duration, was not associated with CRC risk.
We found no evidence that antidepressant use substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer.
Notes
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Feb 15;87(4):265-737707417
Cites: Mutat Res. 1993 Apr;286(2):155-637681526
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):214-238740734
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1997 Sep;44(4):445-89377907
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Jun;46(3):263-810421985
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Mar 12;330(7491):551-215760973
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Mar-Apr;55(2):74-10815761078
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Jun;14(3):201-615901987
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Jul;28(7):1805-715983343
Cites: Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2005;26(3):266-7015991523
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 1;162(9):839-4816207809
Cites: J Br Menopause Soc. 2005 Dec;11(4):166-7216354462
Cites: Nat Rev Cancer. 2006 Feb;6(2):130-4016491072
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2006 Apr;7(4):301-816574545
Cites: Eur J Pharmacol. 2006 Jul 10;541(1-2):17-2316753142
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2006 Oct 9;95(7):934-916926836
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2006 Nov;53(4):441-917150149
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Jan 3;99(1):32-4017202111
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 May;16(5):560-7017286304
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2007 Aug 10;25(23):3462-817687150
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;64(12):1368-7618056544
Cites: Pharmacology. 2008;81(2):164-7218025841
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2009 May;10(5):501-719410194
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2009 Nov;18(11):1111-419623565
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2010 Jan 1;126(1):285-9619739257
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Dec;104(12):3015-2319809413
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Nov;48(11):1407-127490604
Cites: Science. 2000 Mar 31;287(5462):2398-910766613
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jul 24;160(14):2101-710904452
Cites: Med J Aust. 2000 Nov 6;173(9):458-6111149300
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jan 9;287(2):203-911779262
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2004;(420):55-6415128388
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1982 Aug;46(2):260-56983886
Cites: Mutat Res. 1991 May;260(1):99-1041902910
Cites: Cancer Res. 1992 Jul 1;52(13):3796-8001617649
Erratum In: Br J Cancer. 2011 May 24;104(11):1804
PubMed ID
20877356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption and risk of spontaneous abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269422
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 May;30(5):1246-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
K A Hahn
L A Wise
K J Rothman
E M Mikkelsen
S B Brogly
H T Sørensen
A H Riis
E E Hatch
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 May;30(5):1246-55
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - diagnosis - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Beverages
Caffeine - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertilization
Humans
Incidence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Is caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption associated with the risk of spontaneous abortion (SAB)?
While preconceptional caffeine consumption was not materially associated with an increased risk of SAB, consumption during early pregnancy was associated with a small increased risk of SAB, although the relation was not linear.
Caffeine has been hypothesized as a risk factor for SAB since the 1980s; however, results from previous studies have been conflicting.
This prospective cohort study included 5132 Danish women planning pregnancy and enrolled from 2007 to 2010.
Participants were women who conceived after entry into the Snart-Gravid cohort and who were aged 18-40, in a stable relationship with a male partner, and did not use fertility treatments to conceive. Women reported their daily caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption on questionnaires before conception and during early pregnancy. All exposure measurements were prospective with respect to outcome ascertainment. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of SAB for categories of caffeine consumption in milligrams (mg) per day and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression models with gestational weeks as the time scale.
There were 732 women (14.3%) who were identified as having a SAB. In the preconceptional period, caffeine consumption was not materially associated with SAB risk (HR comparing =300 with
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 15;162(10):983-9016207803
Cites: Stat Med. 1989 May;8(5):551-612657958
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2006;46(2):101-2316507475
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(4):467-7516612710
Cites: Epidemiology. 2008 Jan;19(1):55-6218091004
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Mar;198(3):279.e1-818221932
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Jan;20(1):15419234404
Cites: Cancer. 2009 Jun 15;115(12):2765-7419384973
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug;38(4):938-4318782897
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2010 Jan;93(1):304-619732873
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2010 Apr 26;100(1):33-4120138903
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;25(4):275-8020306287
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 May;25(5):297-30420148289
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 1;172(11):1292-820880962
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Sep 15;174(6):701-921719742
Cites: Epidemiology. 1991 May;2(3):163-72054396
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-4511117975
Cites: Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):38-4211138817
Cites: Stat Med. 2001 May 15-30;20(9-10):1541-911343373
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2001 Oct;76(4):723-911591405
Cites: Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):165-7111880757
Cites: Epidemiology. 1991 May;2(3):168-742054397
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Jan;82(1):85-71536340
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Feb 3;269(5):593-78421363
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Jan;25(1):81-918423759
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1992;14:83-1001289118
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Sep;205(3):203.e1-721658667
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Feb;95(2):488-9722237060
Cites: Epidemiology. 2012 May;23(3):393-40122407137
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Apr 1;177(7):690-923462965
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;29(8):541-924965263
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Dec 22-29;270(24):2940-38254854
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;10(6):665-87672044
Cites: Epidemiology. 1996 May;7(3):250-58728437
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Aug;49(8):893-78699210
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Sep;8(5):515-239270953
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2005 Jul;15(6):460-615967394
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):428-3712196312
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2002;24(2):91-10112762085
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2003 Dec;18(12):2704-1014645195
Cites: J Reprod Med. 1977 Aug;19(2):55-63197235
Cites: Dev Pharmacol Ther. 1983;6(5):315-226628163
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Dec 15;147(8):939-426650631
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;20(2):100-916466428
PubMed ID
25788567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Familial risk of venous thromboembolism: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139634
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2011 Feb;9(2):320-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
H T Sørensen
A H Riis
L J Diaz
E W Andersen
J A Baron
P K Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark. hts@dce.au.dk
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2011 Feb;9(2):320-4
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Venous thromboembolism has genetic determinants, but population-based data on familial risks are limited.
To examine the familial risk of venous thromboembolism.
We undertook a nationwide study of a cohort of patients with deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism born after 1952. We used the Danish National Registry of Patients covering all Danish hospitals, for the years 1977 through 2009, to identify index cases of venous thromboembolism, and assessed the incidence among their siblings. We compared standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of the observed and expected number of venous thromboembolism cases among siblings, using population-specific, gender-specific and age-specific incidence rates.
We identified 30,179 siblings of 19,599 cases of venous thromboembolism. The incidence among siblings was 2.2 cases per 1000 person-years, representing a relative risk of 3.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.80-3.39) as compared with the general population. The risk was higher for both men (SIR 3.36, 95% CI 2.96-3.82) and women (SIR 2.81, 95% CI 2.45-3.23). The risk was similar among siblings of index cases with venous thrombosis and those of index cases with pulmonary embolism.
Venous thromboembolism has a strong familial component.
PubMed ID
21040446 View in PubMed
Less detail

Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276841
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
H T Cueto
A H Riis
E E Hatch
L A Wise
K J Rothman
H T Sørensen
E M Mikkelsen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):66-71
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Denmark - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Dietary Supplements - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Female - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Fertility - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Folic Acid - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Humans - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Pregnancy - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Pregnancy Rate - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Prospective Studies - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Reproduction - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Vitamins - drug effects - pharmacology - drug effects - pharmacology
Abstract
Periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and has been associated with ovulatory function. However, only two studies have associated supplementation with multivitamins (MVs) that contained FA with increased pregnancy rates. We aimed to examine the association between FA supplementation (obtained either through single FA tablets or through MVs) and fecundability.
A prospective cohort study of 3895 Danish women who were planning a pregnancy between 2007 and 2011. We estimated fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in relation to FA supplementation (either through single FA tablets or MV) using a proportional probabilities regression model, with adjustment for potential socio-demographic, reproductive and lifestyle confounders. In stratified analyses, we also estimated FR with 95% CI in relation to FA supplementation for women with regular and irregular cycles, respectively, and for women with short (
PubMed ID
26081493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pre-admission use of glucocorticoids and 30-day mortality following colorectal cancer surgery: a population-based Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256795
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Apr;39(8):843-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
E B Ostenfeld
R. Erichsen
O. Thorlacius-Ussing
A H Riis
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Apr;39(8):843-53
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
Previous studies indicate that pre-admission glucocorticoids increase the risk of perioperative complications.
To examine whether pre-admission use of glucocorticoids affects 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery.
We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study by linking Danish medical registries. All residents in Denmark who underwent CRC surgery from 2001 to 2011 were included. We characterised subjects who filled their most recent glucocorticoid prescription =90, 91-365 and >365 days before their surgery date as prevalent, recent and former users, respectively. Prevalent users were subgrouped into new (first-ever prescription =90 days before surgery date) and continuing users. We estimated 30-day cumulative mortality by the Kaplan-Meier method and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs) using Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusting for potential confounders.
Of the 34 641 CRC patients included, 3966 (11.5%) had filled one or more prescriptions of glucocorticoids within the year before the surgery date. Thirty-day mortality among prevalent users of oral glucocorticoids was 15.0% vs. 7.3% among non-users [MRR = 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.58]. Among new users, the 30-day mortality was 17.8% (MRR = 1.92; 95% CI: 1.30, 2.83) while it was 14.2% among continuing users (MRR = 1.13; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.44). No associations were found for recent or former use of oral glucocorticoids nor for use of inhaled, intestinal-acting, and mixed glucocorticoids.
Prevalent use, particulary new use, of oral glucocorticoids was associated with markedly increased 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery compared to patients not exposed to any glucocorticoids.
PubMed ID
24611938 View in PubMed
Less detail

A prospective cohort study of a woman's own gestational age and her fecundability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268928
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 Apr;30(4):947-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
C. Wildenschild
A H Riis
V. Ehrenstein
E E Hatch
L A Wise
K J Rothman
H T Sørensen
E M Mikkelsen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 Apr;30(4):947-56
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Fertilization
Gestational Age
Humans
Infertility, Female - pathology
Pregnancy
Probability
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Time-to-Pregnancy
Abstract
What is the magnitude of the association between a woman's gestational age at her own birth and her fecundability (cycle-specific probability of conception)?
We found a 62% decrease in fecundability among women born
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb 1;157(3):195-20212543618
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2010 Feb;108(2):135-819897189
Cites: Pediatr Res. 2004 Sep;56(3):311-715240866
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;191(4):1225-3115507945
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Jun;115(6):1125-3320502281
Cites: Diabet Med. 2010 Apr;27(4):436-4120536516
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Nov;25(11):2901-620817739
Cites: Stat Med. 2011 Feb 20;30(4):377-9921225900
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Mar;54(3):516-2221170514
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 May;34(5):1109-1321411504
Cites: Mol Hum Reprod. 2011 Jun;17(6):379-8521257601
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Sep 15;174(6):701-921719742
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Nov;54(11):2771-821866407
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Nov;96(11):3432-921900380
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Sep;205(3):286.e1-522071067
Cites: Hypertension. 2012 Feb;59(2):226-3422158643
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2012 Apr;27(4):1170-822286265
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Oct;207(4):333.e1-622892187
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2013 Jan;28(1):125-3723042798
Cites: Pediatrics. 2013 Apr;131(4):e1240-6323509172
Cites: J Pediatr. 2014 Feb;164(2):295-9.e124210922
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Nov;181(5 Pt 1):1216-2110561648
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Feb;182(2):465-7210694353
Cites: Pediatr Res. 2000 May;47(5):575-710813579
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Dec;183(6):1520-411120521
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 2001 Sep;64(2):129-4311440825
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2001 Sep;11(3):329-3311582615
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Jan 17;346(3):149-5711796848
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Jul;87(7):3391-312107255
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Dec;187(6):1660-612501080
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2003 Feb;88(2):135-812538315
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1981 Feb;52(2):235-86780586
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 May;129(5):1072-82705427
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 May 24;155(21):1627-328316999
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Aug;49(8):893-78699210
Cites: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Sep;8(3):178-858915087
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1998 Jun;45(3):320-39675544
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Nov 18;351(21):2179-8615548778
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Apr 15;161(8):725-3315800264
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Oct;118(4):823-3017030233
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Mar;119(3):e562-7317332176
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Jul;120(1):70-717606563
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1429-3618364485
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 3;359(1):61-7318596274
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):262-7318635431
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 Jan;24(1):226-3218819963
Cites: BJOG. 2009 Jan;116(1):108-1319087081
Cites: Diabetes. 2009 Mar;58(3):523-619066311
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug;38(4):938-4318782897
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Dec 1;170(11):1358-6419854807
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(12):1307-1819916879
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Jan;25(1):253-6419828554
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2002 Nov;56(3):235-4812553320
PubMed ID
25678570 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of systemic glucocorticoids and the risk of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119294
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Jan;37(1):146-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
E B Ostenfeld
R. Erichsen
O. Thorlacius-Ussing
A H Riis
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. eos@dce.au.dk
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Jan;37(1):146-52
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Systemic glucocorticoids are potent immunosuppressants, potentially facilitating carcinogenesis. Studies examining glucocorticoids and colorectal cancer risk are few.
To investigate the association between use of systemic glucocorticoids and colorectal cancer risk, both overall and by cancer stage (localised versus metastatic).
We conducted a nested population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (1.8 million people) using medical registries. The study included 14,158 patients with a first-time diagnosis of colorectal cancer from 1991 through 2010. Using risk set sampling, we identified 141,580 population controls, matched on age and gender. Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for covariates.
Frequent use of systemic glucocorticoids (defined as >2 prescriptions) was not associated with overall colorectal cancer risk [adjusted OR (aOR) = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.85-1.00)], compared with never/rare use (=2 prescriptions). Associations according to duration of use and doses (quartiles of cumulative prednisolone equivalents) were also near the null. Examining colorectal cancer by stage, no substantial associations were found between long-term use (>5 years) of high-dose (>5500 mg) systemic glucocorticoids and localised [aOR = 1.12 (95% CI: 0.81-1.55)] or metastatic [aOR = 0.82 (95% CI: 0.59-1.14)] cancer.
Despite immunological and metabolic effects of frequent use of systemic glucocorticoids, which would be expected to increase colorectal cancer risk, we found no substantial association between the two.
Notes
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 May;37(10):1027-823590545
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 May;37(10):1026-723590544
PubMed ID
23116185 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.