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Age of onset in siblings concordant for multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226576
Source
Brain. 1991 Apr;114 ( Pt 2):937-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
D E Bulman
A D Sadovnick
G C Ebers
Author Affiliation
Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Brain. 1991 Apr;114 ( Pt 2):937-50
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
British Columbia
Diseases in Twins
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics - physiopathology
Nuclear Family
Ontario
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
We have evaluated genetic and environmental influences in multiple sclerosis (MS) by comparing age of onset in 99 sibling pairs concordant for the disease. We used three methods of analysis: (1) comparison of mean differences in age of onset and year of onset, (2) linear regression of differences in age or year of onset vs difference in ages, and (3) intraclass correlation of age of onset which is also used for monozygotic twins concordant for MS. Comparison of the mean differences in age of onset or year of onset is found to be inappropriate and potentially misleading. No significant results were found in linear regression of the age of onset or year of onset vs differences in ages, although a trend towards onset at the same age is present. However, nontwin siblings show a significant intraclass correlation for age of onset (P less than 0.01) as is seen in genetic disorders. A stronger intraclass correlation in age of onset in concordant monozygotic twins vs concordant sibling pairs further suggests that age of onset is partly under genetic control, assuming common exposure to an environmental agent. The results give little support for common exposure to an environmental trigger in concordant MS sibling pairs. They are consistent with a mixture of random independent exposures and common exposures leading to the development of the disease, with the former predominating.
PubMed ID
2043958 View in PubMed
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A population-based study of multiple sclerosis in twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236171
Source
N Engl J Med. 1986 Dec 25;315(26):1638-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-25-1986
Author
G C Ebers
D E Bulman
A D Sadovnick
D W Paty
S. Warren
W. Hader
T J Murray
T P Seland
P. Duquette
T. Grey
Source
N Engl J Med. 1986 Dec 25;315(26):1638-42
Date
Dec-25-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disease Susceptibility
Diseases in Twins
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Results from studies of twin concordance in multiple sclerosis have not conclusively differentiated between environmental and genetic factors that determine susceptibility to the disease. Published studies that have been based on case finding by public appeal have been characterized by difficulties in ascertainment. The data reported here are from a large population-based study of multiple sclerosis in twins, in which ascertainment has been relatively unbiased and the cooperation of patients nearly complete. A total of 5463 patients attending 10 multiple sclerosis clinics across Canada were surveyed. Twenty-seven monozygotic and 43 dizygotic twin pairs were identified, and the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was verified by examination and laboratory investigation. Seven of 27 monozygotic pairs (25.9 percent) and 1 of 43 dizygotic pairs (2.3 percent) were concordant for multiple sclerosis. The concordance rate for 4582 nontwin siblings of patients at two multiple sclerosis clinics was 1.9 percent, closely paralleling the concordance rate in dizygotic twins. To the extent that the difference in concordance rates between monozygotic and dizygotic twins indicates genetic susceptibility, the results of this study show a major genetic component in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.
PubMed ID
3785335 View in PubMed
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A population-based study of multiple sclerosis in twins: update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221493
Source
Ann Neurol. 1993 Mar;33(3):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
A D Sadovnick
H. Armstrong
G P Rice
D. Bulman
L. Hashimoto
D W Paty
S A Hashimoto
S. Warren
W. Hader
T J Murray
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Ann Neurol. 1993 Mar;33(3):281-5
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Diseases in Twins
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics
Population
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
This study is a 7.5-year follow-up of a population-based series of twins with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose mean age now exceeds 50 years. The twin pairs were identified through the Canadian nationwide system of MS clinics and were drawn from a population of 5,463 patients. After 7.5 years, the monozygotic concordance rate increased from 25.9 to 30.8% and the dizygotic-like sex concordance rate from 2.4 to 4.7%. These results are very similar to those of other population-based studies and to our own modified replication twin data reported here. We interpret the data to mean that MS susceptibility is genetically influenced, and a single dominant or even a single recessive gene is unlikely to account for this effect. The difference in concordance rates suggests that at least two or more genes are operative. These data also have important implications for the nature of the environmental effect(s) in MS susceptibility. Most monozygotic twins are discordant even after a correction for age and magnetic resonance imaging findings. This unambiguously demonstrates the powerful effect of nonheritable factors.
PubMed ID
8498811 View in PubMed
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Twin concordance and sibling recurrence rates in multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183216
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Oct 28;100(22):12877-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2003
Author
C J Willer
D A Dyment
N J Risch
A D Sadovnick
G C Ebers
Author Affiliation
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN, United Kingdom.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Oct 28;100(22):12877-82
Date
Oct-28-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Diseases in Twins - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Recurrence
Registries
Siblings
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Size and ascertainment constraints often limit twin studies to concordance comparisons between identical and fraternal twins. Here we report the final results of a longitudinal, population-based study of twins with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Canada. Bias was demonstrably minimized, and an estimated 75% of all Canadian MS twin pairs were ascertained, giving a sample sufficiently large (n = 370) to permit additional informative comparisons. Twinning was not found to affect prevalence, and twins with MS did not differ from nontwins for DR15 allele frequency nor for MS risk to their siblings. Probandwise concordance rates of 25.3% (SE +/- 4.4) for monozygotic (MZ), 5.4% (+/-2.8) for dizygotic (DZ), and 2.9% (+/-0.6) for their nontwin siblings were found. MZ twin concordance was in excess of DZ twin concordance. The excess concordance in MZ was derived primarily from like-sexed female pairs with a probandwise concordance rate of 34 of 100 (34 +/- 5.7%) compared with 3 of 79 (3.8 +/- 2.8%) for female DZ pairs. We did not demonstrate an MZ/DZ difference in males, although the sample size was small. We observed a 2-fold increase in risk to DZ twins over nontwin siblings of twins, but the difference was not significant.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14569025 View in PubMed
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