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Maternal age and birth defects: a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226683
Source
Lancet. 1991 Mar 2;337(8740):527-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1991
Author
P A Baird
A D Sadovnick
I M Yee
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 1991 Mar 2;337(8740):527-30
Date
Mar-2-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sampling Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Since more and more women in developed countries are delaying childbearing to an older age, it is important to find out whether birth defects, other than those resulting from chromosomal anomalies, are related to maternal age. We have studied all 26,859 children with birth defects of unknown aetiology identified among 576,815 consecutive livebirths in British Columbia. All these cases' records were linked with provincial birth records to allow determination of maternal age at birth. We excluded children with chromosomal anomalies and those with other birth defects of known aetiology. Only 3 of the 43 birth defect categories studied showed significant maternal-age-specific trends: there were decreasing linear trends with maternal age for patent ductus arteriosus (chi 2 = 36.65, 1 df, p less than 0.01) and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (chi 2 = 4.90, 1 df, p less than 0.05) and a bell-shaped curve (risk increasing to maternal age 30 then falling) for congenital dislocatable hip/hip click. The findings from this population-based analysis of no association between the incidence of birth defects of unknown aetiology and advancing maternal age should be reassuring to healthy women who opt to delay childbearing.
PubMed ID
1671898 View in PubMed
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Maternal age and oral cleft malformations: data from a population-based series of 576,815 consecutive livebirths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218130
Source
Teratology. 1994 Jun;49(6):448-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
P A Baird
A D Sadovnick
I M Yee
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Teratology. 1994 Jun;49(6):448-51
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - etiology
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries
Abstract
It has been suggested that older mothers are more likely to have a child with isolated cleft palate (CP) or cleft lip +/- cleft palate (CL +/- CP), but most of these studies have been based on fairly small sample sizes. Data from a population-based registry with multiple sources of case ascertainment were used to examine any association of maternal age with the incidence of these defects in infants without other congenital anomalies. The study group consisted of all cases with CP or CL +/- CP without other congenital anomalies from a series of over half a million consecutive livebirths during the period 1966 to 1981 inclusive in British Columbia. During the study period, the overall incidences of isolated CP and isolated CL +/- CP per 10,000 livebirths were 3.9 and 8.2, respectively. No association with maternal age was found when either isolated CP or isolated CL +/- CP was analyzed as a group. When analyzed by sex, and by CP or CL +/- CP, no significant maternal-age effect was observed for males and females with CP or CL +/- CP. Our population-based data, therefore, do not show that older mothers are more likely to have a child with cleft palate, or cleft lip +/- cleft palate.
PubMed ID
7747266 View in PubMed
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Population-based study of long-term outcomes after amniocentesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217090
Source
Lancet. 1994 Oct 22;344(8930):1134-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-1994
Author
P A Baird
I M Yee
A D Sadovnick
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Lancet. 1994 Oct 22;344(8930):1134-6
Date
Oct-22-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amniocentesis - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Hearing Disorders - etiology
Humans
Learning Disorders - etiology
Limb Deformities, Congenital
Maternal Age
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Vision Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Amniocentesis is now commonly used in many countries; it is important to know whether there are any long-term adverse effects on children born after this procedure, in particular disabilities that may emerge during childhood or adolescence. We studied consecutive liveborn offspring of women who had had amniocentesis and compared them with matched controls whose mothers had not had amniocentesis. The controls were matched for age of mother, residence by geographic health unit, sex, and when the birth occurred. 1296 cases and 3704 controls were studied. With the exception of one disorder, the offspring of women who had had amniocentesis were no more likely than controls to have a registrable disability (such as hearing disabilities, learning difficulties, visual problems, and limb anomalies) during childhood and adolescence. The follow-up period was 7-18 years. Children of women who had amniocentesis had a significantly higher rate of haemolytic disease due to ABO isoimmunisation than matched controls. The results of this study should therefore be reassuring to women having amniocentesis, and be useful to women making decisions about having this procedure.
Notes
Erratum In: Lancet 1994 Dec 3;344(8936):1582
PubMed ID
7934498 View in PubMed
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Temporal changes in the utilization of amniocentesis for prenatal diagnosis by women of advanced maternal age, 1976-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238829
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1985 May-Jun;5(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
P A Baird
A D Sadovnick
B C McGillivray
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1985 May-Jun;5(3):191-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amniocentesis - utilization
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Diagnosis
Time Factors
Abstract
Utilization of amniocentesis for prenatal diagnosis because of the indication of advanced maternal age (greater than or equal to 35 years at delivery) was examined in the population of B.C. over an 8-year period (1976-1983). As of 1983, approximately one out of three eligible women (greater than or equal to 35 years at delivery) is having the test. In the older group (greater than or equal to 38 years at delivery) approximately one out of two eligible women is having the test. The data do not indicate that the proportion of eligible women having amniocentesis has reached a plateau; utilization is continuing to increase. It appears that prenatal diagnosis is an ethically acceptable alternative for a large proportion of the population.
PubMed ID
4022942 View in PubMed
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