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Effectiveness of Baby-friendly community health services on exclusive breastfeeding and maternal satisfaction: a pragmatic trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287078
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2016 07;12(3):428-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
07-2016
Author
Anne Baerug
Øyvind Langsrud
Beate F Løland
Elisabeth Tufte
Thorkild Tylleskär
Atle Fretheim
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2016 07;12(3):428-39
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cluster analysis
Community Health Services
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Intention
Logistic Models
Male
Mothers
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The WHO/UNICEF Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative has been shown to increase breastfeeding rates, but uncertainty remains about effective methods to improve breastfeeding in community health services. The aim of this pragmatic cluster quasi-randomised controlled trial was to assess the effectiveness of implementing the Baby-friendly Initiative (BFI) in community health services. The primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months in healthy babies. Secondary outcomes were other breastfeeding indicators, mothers' satisfaction with the breastfeeding experience, and perceived pressure to breastfeed. A total of 54 Norwegian municipalities were allocated by alternation to the BFI in community health service intervention or routine care. All mothers with infants of five completed months were invited to participate (n?=?3948), and 1051 mothers in the intervention arm and 981 in the comparison arm returned the questionnaire. Analyses were by intention to treat. Women in the intervention group were more likely to breastfeed exclusively compared with those who received routine care: 17.9% vs. 14.1% until 6 months [cluster adjusted odds ratio (OR)?=?1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.72; P?=?0.03], 41.4% vs. 35.8% until 5 months [cluster adjusted OR?=?1.39; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.77; P?=?0.01], and 72.1% vs. 68.2% for any breastfeeding until 6 months [cluster adjusted OR?=?1.24; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; P?=?0.06]. The intervention had no effect on breastfeeding until 12 months. Maternal breastfeeding experience in the two groups did not differ, neither did perceived breastfeeding pressure from staff in the community health services. In conclusion, the BFI in community health services increased rates of exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months. © 2015 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27062084 View in PubMed
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Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128303
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Pål Kristensen
Trond Heir
Pål H Herlofsen
Øyvind Langsrud
Lars Weisæth
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, Oslo, Norway. Pal.Kristensen@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avalanches - mortality
Death
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Grief
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Military Medicine - methods
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.
PubMed ID
22210364 View in PubMed
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