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Association of change in brain structure to objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in older adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266168
Source
Behav Brain Res. 2015 Sep 10;296:118-124
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2015
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Annemarie Koster
Dane R Van Domelen
Robert J Brychta
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Kong Y Chen
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Source
Behav Brain Res. 2015 Sep 10;296:118-124
Date
Sep-10-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Many studies have examined the hypothesis that greater participation in physical activity (PA) is associated with less brain atrophy. Here we examine, in a sub-sample (n=352, mean age 79.1 years) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study cohort, the association of the baseline and 5-year change in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) to active and sedentary behavior (SB) measured at the end of the 5-year period by a hip-worn accelerometer for seven consecutive days. More GM (ß=0.11; p=0.044) and WM (ß=0.11; p=0.030) at baseline was associated with more total physical activity (TPA). Also, when adjusting for baseline values, the 5-year change in GM (ß=0.14; p=0.0037) and WM (ß=0.11; p=0.030) was associated with TPA. The 5-year change in WM was associated with SB (ß=-0.11; p=0.0007). These data suggest that objectively measured PA and SB late in life are associated with current and prior cross-sectional measures of brain atrophy, and that change over time is associated with PA and SB in expected directions.
PubMed ID
26363425 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286647
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Oct 21;14(10)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Oct 21;14(10)
Date
Oct-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Daily Physical Activity And Mortality Risk In The Very Old: Age, Gene/Environment-Reykjavik Study: 1993 Board #145 June 2, 3: 30 PM - 5: 00 PM.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273805
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 May;48(5S Suppl 1):555
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016

Different cardiorespiratory fitness expressions based on the maximal cycle ergometer test show no effect on the relation of cardiorespiratory fitness to the academic achievement of nine-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297482
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0200643
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Elvar Saevarsson
Erla Svansdottir
Sigurbjorn Arngrimsson
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Author Affiliation
School of Education, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0200643
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test - methods
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Students
Abstract
The relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and academic achievement has been inconclusive. The results may depend on how cardiorespiratory fitness is expressed. The aim of this study is to explore the impact of different cardiorespiratory fitness expression methods, measured by the maximal cycle ergometer test, on the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and academic achievement. A cross-sectional study consisting of 303 Icelandic 4th grade students (163 girls) was conducted. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using a graded maximal cycle ergometer test and scores of standardized tests in Icelandic and math obtained from the Icelandic National Examination Institute. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured as absolute power output in watts in a maximal progressive cycle ergometer test. To adjust for different body sizes, the power output was scaled to body weight, body height, body surface area, and allometrically expressed body weight. In addition, linear regression scaling was also used to adjust for different body sizes. No significant relationship was found between any of the cardiorespiratory fitness expressions and academic achievement, using both univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. The use of different methods to express cardiorespiratory fitness does not significantly affect the association with the academic achievement of fourth grade students.
PubMed ID
30036375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dynamic sitting: Measurement and associations with metabolic health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299067
Source
J Sports Sci. 2019 Mar 30; :1-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-30-2019
Author
Julianne D van der Berg
Coen D A Stehouwer
Hans Bosma
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Nanna Y Arnardottir
Dane R Van Domelen
Robert J Brychta
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Palmi V Jonsson
Tamara B Harris
Annemarie Koster
Author Affiliation
a Department of Social Medicine/CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute , Maastricht University , Maastricht , The Netherlands.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2019 Mar 30; :1-9
Date
Mar-30-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Dynamic sitting, such as fidgeting and desk work, might be associated with health, but remains difficult to identify out of accelerometry data. We examined, in a laboratory study, whether dynamic sitting can be identified out of triaxial activity counts. Among 18 participants (56% men, 27.3 ± 6.5 years), up to 236 counts per minute were recorded in the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes during dynamic sitting using a hip-worn accelerometer. Subsequently, we examined in 621 participants (38% men, 80.0 ± 4.7 years) from the AGES-Reykjavik Study whether dynamic sitting was associated with cardio-metabolic health. Compared to participants who recorded the fewest dynamic sitting minutes (Q1), those with more dynamic sitting minutes had a lower BMI (Q2 = -1.39 (95%CI = -2.33;-0.46); Q3 = -1.87 (-2.82;-0.92); Q4 = -3.38 (-4.32;-2.45)), a smaller waist circumference (Q2 = -2.95 (-5.44;-0.46); Q3 = -3.47 (-6.01;-0.93); Q4 = -8.21 (-10.72;-5.71)), and a lower odds for the metabolic syndrome (Q2 = 0.74 [0.45;1.20] Q3 = 0.58 [0.36;0.95]; Q4 = 0.36 [0.22;0.59]). Our findings suggest that dynamic sitting might be identified using accelerometry and that this behaviour was associated with health. This might be important given the large amounts of time people spend sitting. Future studies with a focus on validation, causation and physiological pathways are needed to further examine the possible relevance of dynamic sitting.
PubMed ID
30929574 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dynamic sitting: Measurement and associations with metabolic health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302498
Source
J Sports Sci. 2019 Aug; 37(15):1746-1754
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Julianne D van der Berg
Coen D A Stehouwer
Hans Bosma
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Nanna Y Arnardottir
Dane R Van Domelen
Robert J Brychta
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Palmi V Jonsson
Tamara B Harris
Annemarie Koster
Author Affiliation
a Department of Social Medicine/CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute , Maastricht University , Maastricht , The Netherlands.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2019 Aug; 37(15):1746-1754
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - instrumentation
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology
Female
Fitness Trackers
Humans
Male
Metabolic syndrome
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sedentary Behavior
Sitting Position
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Dynamic sitting, such as fidgeting and desk work, might be associated with health, but remains difficult to identify out of accelerometry data. We examined, in a laboratory study, whether dynamic sitting can be identified out of triaxial activity counts. Among 18 participants (56% men, 27.3 ± 6.5 years), up to 236 counts per minute were recorded in the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes during dynamic sitting using a hip-worn accelerometer. Subsequently, we examined in 621 participants (38% men, 80.0 ± 4.7 years) from the AGES-Reykjavik Study whether dynamic sitting was associated with cardio-metabolic health. Compared to participants who recorded the fewest dynamic sitting minutes (Q1), those with more dynamic sitting minutes had a lower BMI (Q2 = -1.39 (95%CI = -2.33;-0.46); Q3 = -1.87 (-2.82;-0.92); Q4 = -3.38 (-4.32;-2.45)), a smaller waist circumference (Q2 = -2.95 (-5.44;-0.46); Q3 = -3.47 (-6.01;-0.93); Q4 = -8.21 (-10.72;-5.71)), and a lower odds for the metabolic syndrome (Q2 = 0.74 [0.45;1.20] Q3 = 0.58 [0.36;0.95]; Q4 = 0.36 [0.22;0.59]). Our findings suggest that dynamic sitting might be identified using accelerometry and that this behaviour was associated with health. This might be important given the large amounts of time people spend sitting. Future studies with a focus on validation, causation and physiological pathways are needed to further examine the possible relevance of dynamic sitting.
PubMed ID
30929574 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of asymmetrical limited hip flexion on seating posture, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293053
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Dec; 71:18-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Atli Ágústsson
Þórarinn Sveinsson
Elisabet Rodby-Bousquet
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, School of Health Sciences, Research Centre of Movement Science, Reykjavík, Iceland. Electronic address: atli@hi.is.
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2017 Dec; 71:18-23
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Scoliosis - physiopathology
Sweden
Torso
Young Adult
Abstract
Postural asymmetries with seating problems are common in adults with cerebral palsy.
To analyse the prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion (90°.
Asymmetrical limited hip flexion affects the seating posture and is associated with scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.
PubMed ID
28987968 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in development of mental well-being from adolescence to young adulthood: an eight-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265023
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May;43(3):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sunna Gestsdottir
Arsaell Arnarsson
Kristjan Magnusson
Sigurbjorn Arni Arngrimsson
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 May;43(3):269-75
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety - epidemiology
Body Image - psychology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Self Concept
Self Report
Sex Distribution
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The transition from adolescence to young adulthood is marked by many changes. Mental well-being plays an important role in how individuals deal with these changes and how they develop their lifestyle. The goal of this study was to examine gender differences in the long-term development of self-esteem and other mental well-being variables from the age of 15 to the age of 23.
A baseline measurement was performed in a nationwide sample of 385 Icelandic adolescents aged 15, and a follow-up measurement was conducted eight years later, when participants had reached the age of 23. Standardized questionnaires were used to measure self-reports of self-esteem, life satisfaction, body image, anxiety, depression and somatic complaints.
Women improved their self-esteem significantly more than men from the age of 15 to 23 (p=0.004). Women were more satisfied with their life than men at the age of 23 (p=0.009). Men had a better body image, less anxiety, less depression and fewer somatic complaints than women, independent of age. Across gender, anxiety declined and somatic complaints became fewer (p
PubMed ID
25712030 View in PubMed
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Importance of physical health and health-behaviors in adolescence for risk of dropout from secondary education in young adulthood: an 8-year prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272209
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2015;14:140
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Erla Svansdottir
Sigurbjorn A Arngrimsson
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Erlingur Johannsson
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2015;14:140
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Education
Female
Health - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Humans
Iceland
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Concept
Student Dropouts
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Education and health constitute two interlinked assets that are highly important to individuals. In Iceland, prevalence of dropout from secondary education poses a considerable problem. This 8-year prospective study assesses to what extent poor physical health and negative health-behaviors of Icelandic adolescents predict increased odds of dropout from secondary education.
The sample included n?=?201 Icelandic children who participated at age 15 (baseline) and again at age 23 (follow-up). Data included objective measurements of physical health and questionnaires assessing health-behaviors, education status, parental education, neighborhood characteristics, self-esteem, and depression. Independent t-tests and chi-square were used to assess differences in physical health and health-behaviors at follow-up stratified by education status. Ordinal regression models were conducted to assess whether physical health and health-behaviors at age 15 predicted increased odds of dropout from secondary education at age 23, independent of gender, parental education and psychological factors.
At age 23, 78 % of girls and 71 % of boys had completed a secondary education. Completion of a secondary education was associated with significant health benefits, especially among women. Women without a secondary education had lower fitness, more somatic complaints, higher diastolic blood pressure, less sports participation, and poorer sleep, whilst men without a secondary education watched more television. In logistic regression models somatic complaints during adolescence were associated with 1.09 (95 % CI: 1.02-1.18) higher odds of dropout from secondary education in young adulthood, independent of covariates. Health-behaviors associated with higher dropout odds included smoking (3.67, 95 % CI: 1.50-9.00), alcohol drinking (2.57, 95 % CI: 1.15-5.75), and time spent watching television (1.27, 95 % CI:1.03-1.56), which were independent of most covariates. Finally, mother's higher education was strongly associated with significantly lower dropout odds (OR 0.54, 95 % CI: 0.34-0.88) independent of father's education and psychological factors, whilst high self-esteem was independently associated with lower dropout odds (OR 0.91, 95 % CI: 0.85-0.98).
Completion of a secondary education yields substantial physical health benefits for young women, but not for men. Importantly, somatic complaints and negative health-behaviors among adolescent boys and girls adversely impact their educational outcomes later in life, and may have widespread consequences for their future prospects.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26597711 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.