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Ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill and injured children: A difficult aspect of ambulance nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264168
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Charlotte Nordén
Karin Hult
Åsa Engström
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Child
Critical Illness - nursing
Emergency Nursing
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
Ambulance nurses work daily in both emergency and non-emergency situations that can be demanding. One emotionally demanding situation for ambulance nurses is to nurse children who are ill.
The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill or injured children.
Eight specialist ambulance nurses were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
The analysis resulted in one theme, a difficult aspect of ambulance nursing care, with five categories. The security of both child and parents was considered to be paramount. Ambulance nurses felt relieved when they handed over the responsibility and the child to the receiving unit. The ambulance nurses felt that more training, education and follow-up was desirable in order to increase their security when nursing children.
Ambulance nurses are subject to stressful feelings while nursing children. As providing reassurance to the child and its parents is a cornerstone of the treatment, it is important for the ambulance nurses to take the time to build up a trusting relationship in such an encounter. Skill development in the area might lead to increased security and reduce the mental burden resulting from negative stress.
PubMed ID
23711561 View in PubMed
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Close relatives in intensive care from the perspective of critical care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163926
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Sep;16(9):1651-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Asa Engström
Siv Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. asa.engstrom@ltu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Sep;16(9):1651-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Critical Care - organization & administration - psychology
Empathy
Family - psychology
Focus Groups
Frustration
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Morale
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Visitors to Patients - psychology
Abstract
The aim was to describe critical care nurses' experiences of close relatives within intensive care.
There is a lack of research describing critical care nurses' experiences of the significance of close relatives in intensive care. Knowledge in this area will support critical care nurses to develop good nursing care for the critically ill person and their close relatives.
The design of the study was qualitative. Data collection was carried out through focus group discussions with 24 critical care nurses in four focus groups during spring 2004. The data were subjected to qualitative thematic content analysis.
The focus groups discussions showed that the presence of close relatives was taken for granted by critical care nurses and it was frustrating if the critically ill person did not have any. Information from close relatives made it possible for critical care nurses to create individual care for the critically ill person. They supported close relatives by giving them information, being near and trying to establish good relations with them. Close relatives were important. Critical care nurses lacked forums for reflection and discussion about the care given.
This study indicates that close relatives are a prerequisite for critical care nurses to give good nursing care to meet the needs of the critically ill person. A communication based on mutual understanding is necessary if critical care nurses are to be able to support close relatives. Dealing constantly with situations that were ethically difficult without any chance to reflect was an obstacle for critical care nurses to improve their work with close relatives.
PubMed ID
17459138 View in PubMed
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Critical care nurses' experiences of helicopter transfers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277765
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2015 Jan;20(1):25-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Jonah Senften
Åsa Engström
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2015 Jan;20(1):25-33
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Critical Care - methods
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Critical Illness - nursing
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interviews as Topic
Male
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Transportation of Patients - organization & administration
Abstract
Intensive care is conducted in intensive care units (ICUs), and also during the transportation of critically ill people.
The aim of the study was to describe critical care nurses' (CCNs) experiences of nursing critically ill patients during helicopter transport.
Seven CCNs, five women and two men participated in this study.
Seven participants from two centres in Sweden were recruited. The design uses an inductive, qualitative approach with data collected by means of qualitative interviews with seven CCNs.
The interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to qualitative thematic content analysis.
The analysis resulted in one theme which is safe nursing care, but sometimes feeling afraid and six categories as follows: experiencing the care environment as an ICU with limited space; a loud environment complicates communication; planning and checking to minimize risks; experience and good co-operation; facing the dilemma of allowing relatives to accompany the patient or not; feeling the patient's and their own fear.
CCNs plan for the transportation and control of patients to improve patient safety, but can sometimes feel afraid. Good co-operation is necessary.
The possibilities for CCNs to provide effective nursing care in helicopters are good, although in some cases limited by the environmental conditions.
PubMed ID
24238003 View in PubMed
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Experiences of intensive care unit diaries: 'touching a tender wound'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152404
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2009 Mar-Apr;14(2):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Asa Engström
Kristin Grip
Mikaela Hamrén
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. asa.engstrom@ltu.se
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2009 Mar-Apr;14(2):61-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Critical Illness - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Records as Topic
Respiration, Artificial - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe peoples' experiences of a personal diary written when they were critically ill and receiving care in an intensive care unit (ICU).
In some ICUs, diaries are written by the ICU staff and close relatives of those who are critically ill and mechanically ventilated, but there is a lack of studies that focus on the experiences of the formerly critically ill of personal diaries written when in an ICU.
Qualitative personal interviews were conducted with nine people who were formerly critically ill. The interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
From the analysis of the data, one theme emerged - touching a tender wound, with four categories: being afraid and being deeply touched, appreciating close relatives' notes, a feeling of unreality and gaining coherence. The participants were deeply touched when they read the diary for the first time. Parts of it were experienced as unreal, as if they were reading about someone else. The diary provided necessary knowledge about what had happened during the time when the participants were critically ill and from which they had only fragmented or no memories at all. Even though it aroused strong feelings, reading the diary was experienced as an important support for a long time after their stay in the ICU. Experiencing that one was not fully aware of what had happened and then reading about oneself being critically ill and about one's close relatives' experiences was interpreted as touching a tender wound.
It is suggested that a diary may be a tool that can help formerly critically ill people to gain a sense of coherence concerning their critical illness experience, but reading it can be painful and demanding.
PubMed ID
19243522 View in PubMed
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Experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma - preparing for the unexpected: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284644
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Oct;36:58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Linda Sandström
Carina Nilsson
Päivi Juuso
Åsa Engström
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2016 Oct;36:58-65
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Patients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
A midsize hospital in the north of Sweden with a high-tech intensive care unit and space for up to 10 patients, with an attached postoperative ward for up to 15 patients. The wards are manned by critical care nurses who are also responsible for carrying a trauma pager. When the alarm goes off, the critical care nurse leaves her/his duties and joins a trauma team. The aim of the study was to describe critical care nurse's experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma.
A qualitative descriptive design was used. Data were collected through four focus group discussions with 15 critical care nurses analysed using qualitative content analysis.
One theme: Preparing for the unexpected with four subthemes: (1) Feeling competent, but sometimes inadequate; (2) Feeling unsatisfied with the care environment; (3) Feeling satisfied with well-functioning communication; and (4) Feeling a need to reflect when affected.
Nursing trauma patients require critical care nurses to be prepared for the unexpected. Two aspects of trauma care must be improved in order to fully address the challenges it poses: First, formal preparation and adequate resources must be invested to ensure delivery of quality trauma care. Secondly, follow-ups are needed to evaluate care measures and to give members of the trauma team the opportunity to address feelings of distress or concern.
PubMed ID
27173952 View in PubMed
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The experiences of partners of critically ill persons in an intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70898
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):299-308; quiz 309-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Asa Engström
Siv Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Hedenbrovägen, SE-96136 Boden, Sweden. Asa.Engstrom@ltu.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):299-308; quiz 309-10
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Critical Illness - psychology
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Friends - psychology
Grief
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Morale
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional-Family Relations
Prognosis
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Uncertainty
Visitors to Patients - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe partners' experiences when their spouses received care in an intensive care unit (ICU). Seven partners were interviewed using a narrative approach. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative thematic content analysis. The analysis resulted in three themes; being present, putting oneself in second place and living in uncertainty. It was a shocking experience for the partners to see their critically ill spouse in the ICU. It was important to be able to be present; nothing else mattered. Showing respect, confirming the integrity and dignity of their critically ill spouse were also essential for partners. Receiving support from family and friends was important, as were understanding and accepting what had happened, obtaining information and the way in which this was given. The state of uncertainty concerning the outcome for the critically ill person was difficult to cope with. The partners wanted to hope, even though the prognosis was poor.
PubMed ID
15450619 View in PubMed
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Experiences of suffering multiple trauma: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310215
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2019 Oct; 54:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Linda Sandström
Åsa Engström
Carina Nilsson
Päivi Juuso
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: linda.1.sandstrom@ltu.se.
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2019 Oct; 54:1-6
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Multiple Trauma - complications - psychology
Qualitative Research
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In an effort to strengthen health care professionals' ability to anticipate and address multiple trauma patients' needs, this study aims to explore the experience of suffering from multiple trauma.
This is a qualitative descriptive study. Nine interviews were analysed using content analysis.
The study included patients who had been registered in the Swedish Intensive Care registry [SIR] due to suffering multiple trauma.
The analysis revealed one theme, A detour in life, based on three sub-themes: (a) Feeling lost and not knowing what to expect, (b) Striving to get life back on track and (c) Dealing with 'dead ends' during rehabilitation. The theme showed that those who suffered multiple trauma did not know what to expect of their recovery and they expressed experiencing a lack of understanding and guidance from healthcare professionals. As it was important to focus on the present and find ways to move on in life, they sought for other ways to find direction in matters of rehabilitation and care.
A shared understanding is essential in order to define a person's needs. By setting short-term goals and improving documentation, healthcare professionals across the trauma recovery continuum could more easily gain insight of their patients' needs and address them with supportive guidance.
PubMed ID
31351691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors Influencing Early Postoperative Recovery After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309103
Source
J Perianesth Nurs. 2020 Feb; 35(1):80-84
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Silje Gustafsson
Magnus Strömqvist
Johanna Ekelund
Åsa Engström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
Source
J Perianesth Nurs. 2020 Feb; 35(1):80-84
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - methods - nursing
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
To study the factors influencing early postoperative recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
A nonexperimental retrospective study.
The study was performed using records from all patients who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a hospital in Northern Sweden in 2017 (219 patients in total). Nonparametric data were analyzed using Spearman's rho, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistic regression. Parametric data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation, an independent t test, and analysis of variance.
The length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit was not predicted by factors such as age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, postoperative nausea and vomiting, premedication, or type of surgery. Younger age and high classification level were significant predictors of pain during rest and pain when in motion. No significant predictors of postoperative nausea were found. The majority of study participants experienced little or no pain or nausea. The documentation of pain, nausea, and premedication was inadequate in many cases.
Nurses in postanesthesia care units should work to preventively identify and address patients' medical and emotional needs so that optimal conditions for postoperative recovery can be provided.
PubMed ID
31501015 View in PubMed
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Family members' satisfaction with critical care: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138164
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2011 Jan-Feb;16(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christina Karlsson
Anna Tisell
Asa Engström
Birgitta Andershed
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2011 Jan-Feb;16(1):11-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Communication
Critical Care - organization & administration - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Pilot Projects
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Sweden
Visitors to Patients - education - psychology
Abstract
the aim of this pilot study was to describe family members' satisfaction with the care provided in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU) based on the following needs: assurance, information, proximity, support, and comfort, which are all included in the Critical Care Family Satisfaction Survey (CCFSS).
knowledge concerning satisfaction with care among family members with a critically ill relative in an ICU is important if the family is to be met professionally.
the study design was descriptive and retrospective, with a consecutive selection of family members of critically ill people cared for in an ICU. In total 35 family members participated.
quantitative analyses based on 20 questions, and a qualitative analysis, based on two open questions was used. The median, average value and percent were computed for every question. The open questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
the family members had a high level of satisfaction regarding all groups of needs. They were especially satisfied with flexible visiting hours and the high quality of treatment that the ill person received. The shortcomings that emerged were that family members wanted the physician to be more available for regular talks, the room for relatives was felt to be uncomfortable; and it was felt there were deficiencies in the preparations before the patient's transferral to a ward.
the results highlight the family members' need for regular information and the need to improve the environment in the waiting rooms for family members. The ICU staff's competence and their way of encountering the ill person and their family seem to be important for family members' satisfaction with the care.
PubMed ID
21199550 View in PubMed
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The helicopter as a caring context: Experiences of people suffering trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286003
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:34-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Linda Sandström
Carina Nilsson
Päivi Juuso
Åsa Engström
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:34-38
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Empathy
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Patients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
When emergency medical services (EMS) are needed, the choice of transport depends on several factors. These may include the patient's medical condition, transport accessibility to the accident site and the receiving hospital's resources. Emergency care research is advancing, but little is known about the patient's perspective of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS).
The aim of this study was to describe trauma patients' experiences of HEMS.
Thirteen persons (ages 21-76) were interviewed using an interview guide. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
The analysis resulted in three themes: Being distraught and dazed by the event - patients experienced shock and tension, as well as feelings of curiosity and excitement. Being comforted by the caregivers - as the caregivers were present and attentive, they had no need for relatives in the helicopter. Being safe in a restricted environment - the participants' injuries were taken seriously and the caregivers displayed effective teamwork.
For trauma patients to be taken seriously and treated as 'worst cases' enables them to trust their caregivers and 'hand themselves over' to their care. HEMS provide additional advantageous circumstances, such as being the sole patient and having proximity to a small, professional team.
PubMed ID
27697403 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.