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Socio-economic and school factors of psychological and physical health in Siberian schoolchildren

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32031
Source
Pages 268-274 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
/nternorional Journal ~f Circumpolar Health .Mental diseases and addiction 6012001 Health Questionnaire for children. A School Adjustment Scale was a modified Russian ver- sion of the Achenbach Teacher's Report Form (S).Academic performance was tapped by Grade point average - the mean of the reading
  1 document  
Author
Knyazev, G.G
Slobodskaya, H.R
Safronova, M.V
Savina, N.N
Author Affiliation
State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. G.G.Knyazev@iph.ma.nsc.ru
Source
Pages 268-274 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior problems
Child
Child Behavior
Emotional problems
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mental health
School adjustment
Siberia - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
Cultural influences on psychological and physical health were examined in a sample of Russian schoolchildren in Novosibirsk. To evaluate the children's behaviour the translated short form of the Child Behaviour Checklist was given out to mothers. A School Adjustment Scale and the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire were completed by teachers and one total score was derived from the Rutter Health Questionnaire for children. Children from disturbed families had worse school adjustment and more behavioural problems. Acute respiratory diseases were more frequent in children from large families, while the mother's education level was a protective factor. Academic attainment was positively related to parents' education, CBCL Somatic Complaints and the occurrence of psychosomatic and inflammatory diseases, and negatively related to Externalising Problems. The CBCL Somatic complaints score was the key variable in the prediction of most physical health variables. Overall, the findings show the significance of academic attainment for a child's physical and psychological health. Low academic attainment tends to be connected with Externalising Problems, while higher attainment could be connected with somatisation and physical illness.
PubMed ID
11507981 View in PubMed
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Culture-bound mental disorders among the Tatars of the Siberian north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46084
Source
Pages 275-279 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Spirit of the Great Shaman. Misunderstandings concerning terms and concepts of culture-bound states are analysed. (Int J Circumpolar Health 2001 ;60: 275-279) Key words: culture-bound, mental disorders, Spirit's possession, shaman- ic treatment The study is devoted to the description of the clinic
  1 document  
Author
Korolenko, C
Muhamedzanov, H
Author Affiliation
Novosibirsk State Medical Academy, Department of Psychiatry. Korolenko@online.nsk.su
Source
Pages 275-279 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Possession
Religion
Shamanism
Siberia
Spirit
Abstract
Several forms of culture-bound mental disorders and their shamanic treatment among the Tatars of North Siberia were studied: kizil kootalak--possession by the Spirit of Fertility; orak--moving in of the Spirit of Suicides; oolamchak--the disorder of the natural exchange between the inner and the outer Spirits that induces depression with lethal exit. The shamanic treatment included specific rituals where the shaman receives the support of helper Spirits and the Spirit of the Great Shaman. Misunderstandings concerning terms and concepts of culture-bound states are analysed.
PubMed ID
11507982 View in PubMed
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Age and social support perception in Eastern Europe: Social change and support in four rapidly changing countries

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78243
Source
British Journal of Social Psychology. 2006 Dec;45(Pt 4):799-815
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Goodwin, R
Author Affiliation
School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middx UB8 3PH, UK. robin.goodwin@brunel.ac.uk
Source
British Journal of Social Psychology. 2006 Dec;45(Pt 4):799-815
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude - ethnology
Byelarus
Female
Georgia (Republic)
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Russia
Social Change
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Despite a growing literature on social support processes across the life-span, few studies have examined support perceptions in societies undergoing rapid social transition. This study reports data on age, support and mental health from 2672 participants in four former Soviet nations. Results suggest a small but significant decline in overall support across age (r = -.12), with this slope significantly influenced by nationality and gender. Mental health also declines with age (r = -.15), with tangible support having the greatest mediational effect on the age-mental health relationship. These findings are discussed in the light of the continuing economic and social strains influencing the inhabitants of this region.
PubMed ID
17393881 View in PubMed
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Health status of Native people living in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107714
Source
Pages 561-564 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):561-564
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Health Problems 10th Revision Class ICD 10 (version: 201 0) Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (AOO-B99) Neoplasms (COO-D48) Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (EOO-E90) Mental and behavioral disorders (FOO-F99) Diseases of the netVous system (GOO-G99) Diseases of tl1e ear
  1 document  
Author
Tatiana Burtseva
Tatiana Uvarova
Maya Savvina
Viktor Shadrin
Sergei Avrusin
Vyacheslav Chasnyk
Author Affiliation
Yakut Research Centre for Complex Medical Problems SB RAMS, Yakutsk, Russian Federation.
Source
Pages 561-564 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):561-564
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Siberia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Native people of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) live mostly in northern regions in the so-called "national settlements". Natives usually experience more health-related problems as compared to the total population. As a result, life expectancy at the birth of Natives living in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) is lower compared to ethnic groups living in European countries, in the United States, and in Canada.
To determine the prevalence of diseases among Natives living in Yakutia and to compare the standards of living for Dolgans living in the Anabarsky region and Evenks living in Gigansky and Ust-Maysky regions.
The study was designed as a population-based, cross-sectional examination with the addition of a cross-sectional survey for Dolgans and Evenks. Data were obtained from 324 Evenks, 43 Evens, 230 Dolgans, and 216 people of other ethnic groups, aged 17-86. In the additional cross-sectional survey, 155 Dolgans and 292 Evenks were included.
Among Natives, the most prevalent diseases are digestive diseases (67.9 cases per 100 examined), diseases of the genitourinary system (45.3 per 100 examined), circulatory system diseases (44.4 per 100 examined), diseases of the respiratory system (36.9 cases per 100 examined) and diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (28.4 cases per 100 examined). There are differences in the prevalence among Natives living in different regions. Anabarsky region has the lowest disease burden and Dolgans inhabiting this region have higher standards of living than Evenks living in Gigansky and Ust-Maysky regions.
The prevalence of diseases among the Natives, living in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), is very high. Differences in raw prevalence rate between Native ethnic groups were found, but it is unknown whether these differences can be assigned rather to the difference in standards of living in the inhabited locality than to ethnicity itself.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
PubMed ID
23984287 View in PubMed
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Source
Pages 300-304 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
. Novosibirsk is a city where smoking is very widespread among the male pop- ulation and is growing among women and teenagers. lntnnatianal Jaurnol ef Circumpolar Health JOO Mental diseases and addiction 6012001 MATERIALS AND METHODS Three population surveys carried out by the Institute of Inter
  1 document  
Author
Alexeeva, N.V
Alexeev, O.L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia. zima_iim@issa.nsc.ru
Source
Pages 300-304 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Siberia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco
Abstract
The prevalence of smoking is very high and growing in Siberia. Three population surveys carried out by the Institute of Internal medicine within the framework of the MONICA project (WHO) during 1988-1995 revealed that 59% of the men and 11% of the women aged 25-64 are smokers (2). The number of smokers among children is also growing: 21% of girls and 40% of boys aged 14-17 are smokers (1). Tobacco product advertising is widespread in the city. Cheap cigarettes of bad quality are easily available for the population. The economic situation in the region makes it difficult for people to pay for specialised treatment. That is why new methods of smoking prevention should be found. The main components of our work are: involving local decision-makers in the activity, educating the population, work with mass media, epidemiological studies, international Quit & Win campaigns.
PubMed ID
11507986 View in PubMed
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Flushing response and its role in alcohol disease in Siberian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5167
Source
Pages 454-458 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Flushing Response and its Role in Alcohol Disease in Siberian Populations Svetlana A. Kurilovich1, Igor A. Jakuschenko1, Natalia G. Egorova1, Alexey V. Avksentyuk1, and Vladimir B. Trusov2 1 Imtitute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia 2 Institute of Mental Health, Tomsk, Russia
  1 document  
Author
Kurilovich, S.A.
Jakuschenko, I.A.
Egorova, N.G.
Avksentyuk, A.V.
Trusov, V.B.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Pages 454-458 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cardiomyopathy, alcoholic - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Female
Flushing - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Liver diseases, alcoholic - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Northern territory
Prevalence
Reference Values
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The characteristics of alcohol-induced flushing response were studied in some Siberian Native populations (Chukchi, Eskimo, Jakuts, Udege, and Nanaian). Flushing peculiarities were estimated and the interrelationship with drinking patterns, the ethanol patch test (EPT), and somatic disorders were analyzed. Frequency of flushing response varied from 9.0% to 66.7%, and was more often apparent among females. Only the Nanaian demonstrated typical flushing, which did not allow them to consume high doses of alcohol. In the rest of the populations flushing was "atypical," i.e., appearing sometimes after high doses of alcohol but not interrupting alcohol drinking, and not associated with a positive EPT. Direct genotyping in DNA samples of Chukotka Natives did not reveal atypical allele aldehyde dehydrogenase (AIDH 2/2). Frequencies of alcohol problems, alcohol dependence symptoms, and somatic disorders (arterial hypertension, silent ischemia, diffuse liver lesions, and noncalculous cholecystitis) were higher among atypical flushers compared to nonflushers (p
PubMed ID
10093324 View in PubMed
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Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129581
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
climate change is already having a significant impact on the environment, economic activity, and public health. For the northern peoples, traditions and cultural identity are closely related to the natural environment so any change will have consequences for society in several ways. Methods: A
  1 document  
Author
Alexander N Davydov
Galina V Mikhailova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, Russia. davydov@arh.ru
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
335227
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry
Animal Migration
Animals
Arctic Regions
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Population Groups - psychology
Public Health
Public Opinion
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic climate change is already having a significant impact on the environment, economic activity, and public health. For the northern peoples, traditions and cultural identity are closely related to the natural environment so any change will have consequences for society in several ways.
A questionnaire was given to the population on the Vaigach island, the Nenets who rely to a large degree on hunting, fishing and reindeer herding for survival. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted about perception of climate change.
Climate change is observed and has already had an impact on daily life according to more than 50% of the respondents. The winter season is now colder and longer and the summer season colder and shorter. A decrease in standard of living was noticeable but few were planning to leave.
Climate change has been noticed in the region and it has a negative impact on the standard of living for the Nenets. However, as of yet they do not want to leave as cultural identity is important for their overall well-being.
PubMed ID
22091216 View in PubMed
Documents

Davydov-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Alcohol consumption among Alaskan drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3010
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
in the United States,2 and 12% of all Alaskan adults have alcohol-related mental health or other prob- lems.3 The social and health consequences of al- cohol consumption in Alaska are equally seri- ous. Alcohol and drug use are major contribut- ing factors to 70% of unintentional injuries and 58
  1 document  
Author
Turner, S.J.
Paschane, D.M.
Johnson, M.E.
Fisher, D.G.
Fenaughty, A.M.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, USA.
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Data Collection
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated predictors of alcohol consumption among drug users not currently in treatment in Anchorage, Alaska. Data were collected from 114 female and 269 male drug users via structured interviews. Alcohol consumption was defined as estimated number of drinks consumed in the last 30 days. Results revealed a high proportion consuming alcohol within the last 48 hours and 30 days (73% and 96%, respectively). Stepwise multiple regression revealed that five variables, accounting for 9% of the variance, were significantly related to alcohol consumption. Positively related were greater perceived risk of getting AIDS; obtaining income from spouse, family, or friend; living on the streets or in a shelter; or living in a hotel or boarding house. Negatively related was having an education level greater than high school. For those participants who reported having sex during the last 30 days, two variables were positively related to alcohol consumption and accounted for 17% of the variance: numberof times used alcohol with sex and frequency of sex without a condom. In addition to identifying several demographic variables that are significantly related to alcohol consumption, the results document the relationship between alcohol consumption and unsafe sexual practices.
PubMed ID
10093323 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in northern populations of Siberia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47682
Source
Pages 205-210 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
- mental factors do not increase the risk for diabetes in aliens of northern Siberia Health care 60/ 2001 •Northern Indigenous El Northern •lieM •Soutbem Table II. Prevalence of diagnosed NIDDM by age in rural populations of rhree cnas a( the KiusncJrank reptn (al RlleS aptmed as per I 000
  1 document  
Author
Dogadin, S.A
Mashtakov, B.P
Taranushenko, T.E
Author Affiliation
Regional Clinical Hospital N 1, Endocrinology Centre, Krasnoyarsk, Russia. Dogadin@online.ru
Source
Pages 205-210 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alian populations
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indigenous populations
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the first part of the study the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed Type 2 diabetes among adult rural populations of southern, central and northern areas of the Krasnoyarsk region of Siberia is compared. The six-year mean incidence of diabetes in the southern area was 0.86 per 1000 (95% CI: 0.66-1.06), in the central area this incidence was 0.79 (0.57-1.01). In contrast, in the northern area the mean Type 2 incidence among indigenous population was 0.16 per 1000 (0-0.43) and among aliens it was 0.38 (0.22-0.54). The age-standardised Type 2 diabetes prevalence in the population of southern and central areas were 10.23 (9.55-10.-92) and 10.77 (9.99-11.55), respectively. In the northern area among aliens it was 8.98 (8.18-9.78) and among indigenous peoples only 2.54 per 1000 (1.46-3.62). The second part of this study consists of a population based survey to determine the prevalence rate of Type 2 diabetes among 596 Evenks and 306 alien inhabitants in Evenkia (82% eligible participants of Baikit district). No cases of glucose intolerance were found among Evenks in this study and one case of Type 2 diabetes was confirmed among aliens (prevalence rate 3.27 per 1000). These data indicate that Type 2 diabetes is still rare among northern indigenous populations of Siberia and that diabetes in northern alien populations is less prevalent than among peoples of central and southern areas of Siberia.
PubMed ID
11507970 View in PubMed
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The study of addictive behaviour in Siberia: implications for research in circumpolar nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227747
Source
Pages 320-322 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
north. The adaptation process is also affected by the body's ability to change to meet new environ- mental conditions. Psychological adaptation can be impaired and p;ychological distl'C$ can be experi- enced when people arc subjected to extreme geo
  1 document  
Author
B. Segal
C. Korolenko
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
Pages 320-322 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology - psychology
Arctic Regions
Behavior, Addictive - ethnology - psychology
Cold Climate
Continental Population Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Siberia
PubMed ID
1365140 View in PubMed
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