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Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1994 Sep;15(3):141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
H. Viinamäki
S. Rastas
L. Tukeva
S. Kuha
L. Niskanen
S. Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1994 Sep;15(3):141-6
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Finland
Health services needs and demand
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Marriage - psychology
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Mental health
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Support
Abstract
The mental health of parturients 1-2 months after delivery was assessed. The study was carried out using a questionnaire between September and November 1992 in connection with the postpartum visits of mothers to the maternity health care center. The need for psychological help was assessed using a 12-item questionnaire (General Health Questionnaire), according to which 28% of the subjects needed psychological help. These mothers did not differ from the others in terms of age, marital status, education, or financial situation. Nor was the need for psychological help associated with health habits, with traumatic life events or conflicts during childhood and adolescence, or with delivery-related factors. Mothers needing psychological help were more depressed and considered the social support they were receiving to be inadequate more often than the others. These women also more often reported marital problems during pregnancy and after delivery. None of the mothers had sought help because of mental health problems. It is concluded that antenatal and postnatal clinics should pay more attention to the mental health of mothers.
PubMed ID
8000471 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Ment Health. 1978 Jun;26(2):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
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[Mental health among mentally disabled persons]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72014
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2000
Author
E. Skullerud
O M Linaker
A C Svenning
H. Torske
Author Affiliation
Habiliteringstjenesten for voksne i Sør-Trøndelag Brøsetveien 100 7045 Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Date
Nov-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mental health
Mental Retardation - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Norway
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Social Support
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mentally retarded persons have high prevalences of psychiatric disorders and often receive little professional help for them. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a total of 48 mentally retarded inhabitants in a local community, 28 were selected on the basis of possible psychiatric problems. A psychiatrist diagnosed the persons and gave advice based on personal observation, contact with caregivers, and all available documentation. RESULTS: The estimated levels of functioning were adjusted for 19 persons. 32 new psychiatric diagnoses were detected. Milieu changes were recommended for 25 persons, and 26 changes in psychotropic medication were recommended. INTERPRETATION: Although the procedure is workintensive, the results justify the described approach.
PubMed ID
11187162 View in PubMed
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Quebec child mental health survey: prevalence of DSM-III-R mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202506
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
N. Gaudet
J. Lambert
M. St-Georges
L. Houde
S. Lépine
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des Prairies Hospital and Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manuals as Topic - standards
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parents
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Teaching
Abstract
The Quebec Child Mental Health Survey (QCMHS) was conducted in 1992 on a representative sample of 2400 children and adolescents aged 6 to 14 years from throughout Quebec. Prevalences of nine Axis-I DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) mental health disorders were calculated based on each informant (for 6-11-year-olds: child, parent, and teacher; for 12-14-year-olds: child and parent). Informant parallelism allows the classification of results of the demographic variables associated with disorders in the logistic regression models. This strategy applies to group variables (correlates of disorders) whereas informant agreement applies to individual diagnoses. Informant parallelism implies that results for two informants or more are in the same direction and significant. In the QCMHS, informant parallelism exists for disruptive disorders, i.e. in two ADHD regression models (child and parent) higher rates among boys and young children, and in three oppositional/conduct disorders regression models (child, parent, and teacher) higher rates among boys. No informant parallelism is observed in the logistic regression models for internalizing disorders, i.e. the patterns of association of demographic variables with anxiety and depressive disorders vary across informants. Urban-rural residence does not emerge as a significant variable in any of the logistic regression models. The overall 6-month prevalences reach 19.9% according to the parent and 15.8% according to the child. The implications of the results for policy makers and clinicians are discussed.
PubMed ID
10190339 View in PubMed
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Mental health: integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation between mental health patients, adult mental health services and social services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70919
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jukka Piippo
Jukka Aaltonen
Author Affiliation
Junior Lecturer, University of Mälardalen, Västerås, Sweden. jukka.piippo@mdh.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Patient satisfaction
Social Work, Psychiatric
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Co-operation between mental health care units and the social services is important in the case of people with social problems who also suffer from mental health problems. However, participation of patients and their families in the treatment process, and co-operation between them and the professionals, are also important. Communication between the professionals, patients and their family members, and the professionals is a crucial factor for co-operation. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences and importance of co-operation for the patients. The data consisted of interviews with 22 mental health patients who were also clients of municipal social services. METHOD: The grounded theory approach was used, focusing on the informants' experiences of the integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation. RESULTS: The findings indicate the importance of the participation of patients and their social networks in psychiatric care or the treatment process. Meetings should be characterized by open and reflexive discussions with all participants' points of view being included, so that fruitful co-operation is possible. However, some negative experiences were also reported, all of which were connected with the professionals' behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Trust and honesty are essential elements in relations between professionals and psychiatric patients, but it cannot be assumed that they will develop naturally. It is the professionals' responsibility to adjust their behaviour so that these elements can be created in a mutual process between patients and professionals. Multidisciplinary teams are a necessity in family-oriented co-operation between psychiatry and social services, and in a satisfactory caring process. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses' work is often individually oriented and nurses are ruled by routines in their work. The mental health caring process should be seen as a shared process between the patient, his/her human environment and professionals for which nurses need skills to their interaction with patients and their social network.
PubMed ID
15361161 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and mental health of parents of children with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9842
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Olafur O Guethmundsson
Kristinn Tómasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Landspitali University Hospital, Dalbraut 12, IS-105 Reyjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Mental health of parents and their quality of life is likely to be affected when a child in the family has a psychiatric disorder. The purpose of this study is to assess quality of life and mental health of parents of referred children waiting for service at the only child psychiatric service in Iceland, with reassessment at least 3 months after first attendance to the service. In order to do so, 208 parents of 123 children waiting for psychiatric care were sent the Icelandic Quality of Life (IQL), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and the CAGE screen for alcoholism. For reassessment, responders in the first phase were assessed again with the IQL and GHQ-30, at least 3 months after initiation of child psychiatric interventions. A total of 120 of the 208 parents (58%) responded in the first phase of the study, 49 fathers and 71 mothers. The mean (+/- s, standard deviation) standardized IQL T-score was for the fathers 51+/- 7.5 but significantly lower for the mothers or 45 +/-11.5 (P = 0.001) compared to normal sample of same-age women (T-scores of 50 are normal). Nearly 55% of women compared with 26% of men were psychiatric cases, scoring 5 or higher on the GHQ. According to a CAGE score of 2 and above 16% of fathers and 14% of mother abused alcohol. No significant change occurred in parents GHQ-30 or IQL before and after initiation of treatment. We conclude that mothers of children with mental disorders have poor quality of life, and high prevalence of mental disorders; hence child psychiatry clinics need to ensure that mothers receive appropriate care along with the child.
PubMed ID
12495535 View in PubMed
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Evolution of postpartum mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207592
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Sep;18(3):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
H. Viinamäki
L. Niskanen
P. Pesonen
S. Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Sep;18(3):213-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chronic Disease
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - psychology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
We investigated the postpartum mental health of 139 mothers, 4-8 weeks after delivery and 2 years later. The sample consisted of mothers who attended a maternity center for a routine health check-up 1-2 months after delivery. The occurrence of mental disorders was assessed using a 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The occurrence of mental disorders (> 2 on the GHQ) was 28.1% in the initial check-up and 19.4% 2 years later. Mental health improved in 27 mothers (19%) but remained impaired (i.e. cases) in 12 (9%). Mental health was normal in 85 mothers (61%) during both examinations. Factors predicting chronicity of mental disorder on univariate analysis were poor financial situation, poor social support, problems with a partner and life events perceived as stressful during follow-up. Those with continuing mental-health problems had more psychiatric problems than the others before pregnancy. Most (92%) of these subjects had not become pregnant again. Using a logistic-regression analysis, independent factors predicting chronicity of mental-health problems were the high Zung score (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.65) and a deterioration in relationship with a partner during pregnancy (OR 29, 95% CI 1.83-460). On the other hand, a low Zung score (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.14-1.44) after delivery predicted recovery from mental disorder. A postpartum mental disorder usually resolves spontaneously. However, mental symptoms sometimes persist. The postpartum mental-health of mothers should be assessed, and treatment provided, if necessary.
PubMed ID
9304542 View in PubMed
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[Mental health surveys: methodological aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242427
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1983;31(3):341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
M. Tousignant
V. Kovess
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1983;31(3):341-6
Date
1983
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Mental health
Quebec
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
6658107 View in PubMed
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Racial and ethnic differences in the mental health problems and use of mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5973
Source
Med Care. 2005 Aug;43(8):775-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Katherine M Harris
Mark J Edlund
Sharon Larson
Author Affiliation
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, Maryland 20856, USA. kharris@samhsa.gov
Source
Med Care. 2005 Aug;43(8):775-84
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - classification
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Class
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We compared rates of mental health problems and use of mental health care across multiple racial and ethnic groups using secondary data from a large, nationally representative survey. METHODS: We pooled cross-sectional data from the 2001-2003 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Our sample included 134,875 adults classified as white, African American, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, Mexican, Central and South American, Puerto Rican, other Hispanic-Latino, or those with multiple race and ethnicities. For each group, we estimate the past year probability of: (1) having 1 or more mental health symptoms in the past year, (2) having serious mental illness in the past year, (3) using mental health care, (4) using mental health care conditional on having mental health problems, (5) reporting unmet need for mental health care, and (6) reporting unmet need for mental health care conditional on having mental health problems. RESULTS: We found significantly higher rates of mental health problems and higher self-reported unmet need relative to whites among American Indian/Alaskan Natives and lower rates of mental health problems and use of mental health care among African American, Asian, Mexican, Central and South American, and other Hispanic-Latino groups. These differences generally were robust to the inclusion of clinical and socio demographic covariates. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our study shows wide variation in mental health morbidity and use of mental health care across racial and ethnic groups in the United States. These results can help to focus efforts aimed at understanding the underlying causes of the differences we observe.
PubMed ID
16034291 View in PubMed
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Perceived effectiveness of mental health care provided by primary-care physicians and mental health specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164905
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Mar-Apr;48(2):123-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jianli Wang
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Heritage Medical Research Building, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. jlwang@ucalgary.ca
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Mar-Apr;48(2):123-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Mental health services
Patient satisfaction
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care
Social Perception
Abstract
The authors used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-Being to estimate and compare perceived effectiveness of mental health care provided by general practitioners/family doctors (GP/FDs), by mental health specialists among those who visited GP/FDs, and by mental health specialists-only in the past 12 months (N=2,859). The authors found that, in Canada, perceived effectiveness of mental health care provided by GP/FDs did not significantly differ from that provided by mental health specialists. Using services from both GP/FDs and mental health specialists and taking psychotropic medication improved perceived effectiveness of care.
PubMed ID
17329605 View in PubMed
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Validating the Mental Health Assessment Protocols (MHAPs) in the Resident Assessment Instrument Mental Health (RAI-MH).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149062
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Sep;16(7):646-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
L. Martin
J P Hirdes
J N Morris
P. Montague
T. Rabinowitz
B E Fries
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1, Canada. lynn.martin@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Sep;16(7):646-53
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Clinical Protocols - standards
Community Mental Health Services
Continuity of Patient Care
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Patient Care Planning
Patient-Centered Care
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychometrics
Risk Assessment - organization & administration
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
For persons with mental illness and addictions, comprehensive assessment of their strengths, preferences and needs is central to person-centred care planning. In this study, the validity of the Mental Health Assessment Protocols (MHAPs) embedded in the Resident Assessment Instrument Mental Health instrument (the mandated assessment system for Ontario adult inpatient psychiatry) is examined, and triggering rates are compared in inpatient and community-based mental health settings. The sample is based on adults admitted to a psychiatric facility (n = 963) and to community mental health programmes (n = 1505) participating in the study. An international panel of mental health experts further evaluated study results. Among the 27 MHAPs, all but one had sensitivity rates above 80%, and the specificity was over 80% for 74% of the MHAPs. The expert panel found that the MHAPs worked well and could be used to support mental health care. The present study found that the MHAPs are valid measures, though more complex triggering algorithms capable of differentiating individuals based on outcomes were suggested to enhance their clinical relevance to care planning. Further, the use of compatible instrumentation in community-based mental health settings was promoted to enhance continuity of care.
PubMed ID
19689558 View in PubMed
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Mental health services for medical students: perceptions of students, student affairs deans, and mental health providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221104
Source
Acad Med. 1993 May;68(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
S M Plaut
S A Maxwell
L. Seng
J J O'Brien
G F Fairclough
Author Affiliation
Office of Student Affairs, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201.
Source
Acad Med. 1993 May;68(5):360-5
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Confidentiality
Data Collection
Faculty, Medical
Female
Health Personnel
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - economics - utilization
Perception
Students, Medical - psychology
United States
Abstract
To examine (1) whether there is any consistency among medical schools in mental health services provided and (2) how these services are perceived by student affairs deans, mental health service providers, and the students themselves.
Questionnaires were sent in October 1991 to the student affairs dean (or director), the individual responsible for student mental health services, and a student representative in each of the 126 U.S. and Canadian medical schools. Data were sought regarding personnel, individuals served, location, hours, administration, funding, confidentiality, administrative referrals, and respondents' suggestions for improvement. Possible differences among the three groups of respondents were tested by chi-square.
Responses were received from 75 student affairs deans, 53 mental health providers, and 30 students. There was much diversity among schools in services provided, especially in the areas of administration and funding. Although perceptions of the three respondent groups were often the same, they differed significantly in a number of areas. Suggestions for improvement of services involved funding, personnel, hours, confidentiality and privacy, specialty services, preventive and support programs, and visibility. The suggestion most frequently made by the students was for increased information and visibility.
The differences among schools coupled with the differing perceptions within schools indicate a need for a comprehensive consideration of what kinds of mental health services are needed and how they can best be made accessible to a diverse body of students experiencing a variety of academic and personal challenges.
PubMed ID
8484849 View in PubMed
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New mental health indicators provide a snapshot on performance of the mental health system in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123545
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carolyn Sandoval
Chantal Couris
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):14-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the general hospital remains an important place for stabilizing crises, most services for mental illnesses are provided in outpatient/community settings. In the absence of comprehensive data at the community level, data that are routinely collected from general hospitals can provide insights on the performance of mental health services for people living with mental illness or poor mental health. This article describes three new indicators that provide a snapshot on the performance of the mental health system in Canada: self-injury hospitalization rate, 30-day readmission rate for mental illness and percentage of patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness. Findings suggest a need for the early detection and treatment of mental illnesses and for optimal transitions between general hospitals and community services.
PubMed ID
22688199 View in PubMed
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Assessment of mental health and illness by telephone survey: experience with an Alberta mental health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165102
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2006;27(3):99-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Scott B Patten
Carol E Adair
Jeanne Va Williams
Rollin Brant
Jian Li Wang
Ann Casebeer
Pierre Beauséjour
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2006;27(3):99-109
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Sex Distribution
Telephone
Abstract
Mental health is an emerging priority for health surveillance. It has not been determined that the existing data sources can adequately meet surveillance needs. The objective of this project was to explore the use of telephone surveys as a means of collecting supplementary surveillance information. A computer-assisted telephone interview was administered to 5,400 subjects in Alberta. The interview included a set of brief, validated measures for evaluating mental disorder prevalence and related variables. The individual subject response rate was 78 percent, but a substantial number of refusals occurred at the initial household contact. The age and sex distribution of the study sample differed from that of the provincial population prior to weighting. Prevalence proportions did not vary substantially across administrative health regions. There is a potential role for telephone data collection in mental health surveillance, but these results highlight some associated methodological challenges. They also draw into question the importance of regional variation in mental disorder prevalence--which might otherwise have been a key advantage of telephone survey methodologies.
PubMed ID
17306061 View in PubMed
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Mental health promotion in comprehensive schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268855
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Sep;21(7):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
A M Onnela
P. Vuokila-Oikkonen
T. Hurtig
H. Ebeling
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Sep;21(7):618-27
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Mental Health - education
School Health Services - standards
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe a participatory action research process on the development of a professional practice model of mental health nurses in mental health promotion in a comprehensive school environment in the city of Oulu, Finland. The developed model is a new method of mental health promotion for mental health nurses working in comprehensive schools. The professional practice model has been developed in workshops together with school staff, interest groups, parents and students. Information gathered from the workshops was analysed using action research methods. Mental health promotion interventions are delivered at three levels: universal, which is an intervention that affects the whole school or community; selective, which is an intervention focusing on a certain group of students; and indicated, which is an individually focused intervention. All interventions are delivered within the school setting, which is a universal setting for all school-aged children. The interventions share the goal of promoting mental health. The purposes of the interventions are enhancing protective factors, reducing risk factors relating to mental health problems and early identification of mental health problems as well as rapid delivery of support or referral to specialized services. The common effect of the interventions on all levels is the increase in the experience of positive mental health.
PubMed ID
24612241 View in PubMed
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The Icelandic child mental health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35531
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
H. Hannesdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:86-92
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Family Health
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Mental health
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the applicability of a standardized procedure for assessing Icelandic children's behavior/emotional problems and competencies, and to identify differences related to demographic variables. This study focuses upon the method of using the Child Behavior Checklist by Achenbach to estimate the self-reported prevalence by parents and adolescents of emotional and behavior problems in children from 2-16 years of age and self-reported prevalence of adolescents from 11-18 years, selected at random from the general population, both in urban and rural areas. The information was obtained by mailing lists with a letter to parents of children 2-10 years of age. The lists for adolescents 11-18 years of age were distributed by teachers in school. Those adolescents who were not in school received the lists by mail at their homes. The Child Behavior Checklists used for analyses were completed by 109 parents of 2-3 year old children; 943 parents of 4-16 year old children, and 546 non-referred adolescents from the general population. The rate of response was lowest for the youngest age group (47%), but increasing to 62% with increasing age of the child. The response rate among the adolescents answering the Youth Self Report was 64%. Comparisons are presented with the Child Behavior Checklist for this study with Dutch, American, French, Canadian, German and Chilean samples and show striking similarities in four of these countries in behavior/emotional problems reported. The present study prevalence data behavior/emotional problems in Icelandic children from the general population from 4-16 year olds for 943 children is 17.5 (boys 19.1; girls 15.).
PubMed ID
7639910 View in PubMed
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Refugees' time perspective and mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208104
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;154(7):996-1002
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
M. Beiser
I. Hyman
Author Affiliation
Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto, Ont., Canada. beiserm@cs.clarke-inst.on.ca
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;154(7):996-1002
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asia, Southeastern - ethnology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Humans
Imagination
Life Change Events
Male
Memory
Mental health
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Refugees - psychology
Time Perception
Abstract
The authors' goal was to investigate factors protective of the mental health of refugees, with a particular focus on time splitting and suppression of the past.
Structured interviews covering premigration and postmigration stresses, personal and social resources, and mental health were given to 1,348 Southeast Asian refugees resettled in Vancouver, British Columbia, and to a comparison sample of 319 residents of Vancouver. Both groups of subjects also performed a task designed to measure orientation toward past, present, and future.
Compared with resident Canadians, refugees were more likely to exhibit an atomistic time perspective in which past, present, and future are split. Temporal atomism and avoidance of nostalgia were associated with a lower risk of depression than were other time perspectives.
Under conditions of extreme adversity, time splitting and suppression of the past may be adaptive strategies, mitigating the risk of depression.
PubMed ID
9210752 View in PubMed
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The mental health of Portuguese children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221748
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
D J Pepler
I. Lessa
Author Affiliation
York University, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Child Reactive Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Portugal - ethnology
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the mental health of Portuguese children in Canada. Preliminary work involved a survey of professionals serving the Portuguese community and the translation and assessment of a standardized child behaviour checklist. Forty-five Portuguese children and 45 non Portuguese children referred to a children's mental health centre were compared on demographic and family indicators and their referral source. There were similar proportions of boys and girls in the two groups, similar types of services were requested, and they had similar treatment histories. The Portuguese children were older at the time of referral and were more likely to be referred by educational agencies than the non Portuguese children. Portuguese families appeared to experience different stresses than non Portuguese families. Implications of these findings for the provision of culturally sensitive interventions for Portuguese children and their families are discussed.
PubMed ID
8448721 View in PubMed
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[Work and mental health: risk groups].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212467
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Vézina
S. Gingras
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université Laval.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):135-40
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Burnout, Professional - etiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Quebec
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Support
Abstract
Analysis of the Quebec Health survey identified those Quebec industrial sectors and professions in which workers are at risk of higher psychological distress and lower psychological well-being. Risk levels were measured by odds ratio, controlling for: health status, sex, social support and stressful life events. Results show that those at risk are blue collar workers and less qualified workers of traditional sectors. Lower job latitude could explain those results. Results show that risk of mental health problems is significantly higher in the following industrial sectors: leather, chemicals, paint and varnish industries; urban bus transport and taxi; shoe, clothing and textile retail stores; department stores; restaurant services; insurance and public administration (excluding defence). Risk of mental health problems is higher in the following professions road transport (excluding truck drivers); textile, leather, fur manufacturing and repairing; housekeeping and maintenance; painters, tapestry-workers, insulation and waterproofing, food and beverages sector; data processors; editors and university professors.
PubMed ID
8753644 View in PubMed
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