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1798 records – page 1 of 90.

Quebec child mental health survey: prevalence of DSM-III-R mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202506
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
N. Gaudet
J. Lambert
M. St-Georges
L. Houde
S. Lépine
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des Prairies Hospital and Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manuals as Topic - standards
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parents
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Teaching
Abstract
The Quebec Child Mental Health Survey (QCMHS) was conducted in 1992 on a representative sample of 2400 children and adolescents aged 6 to 14 years from throughout Quebec. Prevalences of nine Axis-I DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) mental health disorders were calculated based on each informant (for 6-11-year-olds: child, parent, and teacher; for 12-14-year-olds: child and parent). Informant parallelism allows the classification of results of the demographic variables associated with disorders in the logistic regression models. This strategy applies to group variables (correlates of disorders) whereas informant agreement applies to individual diagnoses. Informant parallelism implies that results for two informants or more are in the same direction and significant. In the QCMHS, informant parallelism exists for disruptive disorders, i.e. in two ADHD regression models (child and parent) higher rates among boys and young children, and in three oppositional/conduct disorders regression models (child, parent, and teacher) higher rates among boys. No informant parallelism is observed in the logistic regression models for internalizing disorders, i.e. the patterns of association of demographic variables with anxiety and depressive disorders vary across informants. Urban-rural residence does not emerge as a significant variable in any of the logistic regression models. The overall 6-month prevalences reach 19.9% according to the parent and 15.8% according to the child. The implications of the results for policy makers and clinicians are discussed.
PubMed ID
10190339 View in PubMed
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The Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society: 20 years' experience in urban community mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220978
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
N. Sladen-Dew
D A Bigelow
R. Buckley
S. Bornemann
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services - trends
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Family Therapy - trends
Forecasting
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Care Team - trends
Social Adjustment
Societies, Medical - trends
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
Caring for people in the community with persistent and disabling mental illnesses presents a major challenge to government, planners and mental health professionals. The success with which mentally disabled people are integrated into community life says much about the society in which we live. This article describes the experience of the Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society in offering community-based mental health services to persons with schizophrenia and other major mental disorders over the past 20 years. The key to its success lies in a decentralized, relatively non hierarchical organizational structure which allows committed and skilled multidisciplinary teams to work with patients and their families in their community. The resulting services are fully integrated within the fabric of the community and are responsive to local needs. Partnerships among professionals, patients, families and community agencies result in work that is creative, productive and effective.
PubMed ID
8348468 View in PubMed
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Consequences of childhood mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161144
Source
Natl Bur Econ Res Bull Aging Health. 2007;(20):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

The Icelandic child mental health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35531
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
H. Hannesdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:86-92
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Family Health
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Mental health
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the applicability of a standardized procedure for assessing Icelandic children's behavior/emotional problems and competencies, and to identify differences related to demographic variables. This study focuses upon the method of using the Child Behavior Checklist by Achenbach to estimate the self-reported prevalence by parents and adolescents of emotional and behavior problems in children from 2-16 years of age and self-reported prevalence of adolescents from 11-18 years, selected at random from the general population, both in urban and rural areas. The information was obtained by mailing lists with a letter to parents of children 2-10 years of age. The lists for adolescents 11-18 years of age were distributed by teachers in school. Those adolescents who were not in school received the lists by mail at their homes. The Child Behavior Checklists used for analyses were completed by 109 parents of 2-3 year old children; 943 parents of 4-16 year old children, and 546 non-referred adolescents from the general population. The rate of response was lowest for the youngest age group (47%), but increasing to 62% with increasing age of the child. The response rate among the adolescents answering the Youth Self Report was 64%. Comparisons are presented with the Child Behavior Checklist for this study with Dutch, American, French, Canadian, German and Chilean samples and show striking similarities in four of these countries in behavior/emotional problems reported. The present study prevalence data behavior/emotional problems in Icelandic children from the general population from 4-16 year olds for 943 children is 17.5 (boys 19.1; girls 15.).
PubMed ID
7639910 View in PubMed
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The mental health of Portuguese children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221748
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
D J Pepler
I. Lessa
Author Affiliation
York University, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Child Reactive Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Portugal - ethnology
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the mental health of Portuguese children in Canada. Preliminary work involved a survey of professionals serving the Portuguese community and the translation and assessment of a standardized child behaviour checklist. Forty-five Portuguese children and 45 non Portuguese children referred to a children's mental health centre were compared on demographic and family indicators and their referral source. There were similar proportions of boys and girls in the two groups, similar types of services were requested, and they had similar treatment histories. The Portuguese children were older at the time of referral and were more likely to be referred by educational agencies than the non Portuguese children. Portuguese families appeared to experience different stresses than non Portuguese families. Implications of these findings for the provision of culturally sensitive interventions for Portuguese children and their families are discussed.
PubMed ID
8448721 View in PubMed
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Mental health of outpatient pediatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290754
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2016 Dec; 57(6):509-515
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
John A Rønning
Hans Petter Fundingsrud
Arild Leknessund
Bjørn Helge Handegård
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Research Group, The Arctic University of Norway - UiT, Tromsø, Norway. john.ronning@uit.no.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2016 Dec; 57(6):509-515
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Outpatients
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to estimate the percentage of mental health problems in a pediatric outpatient Norwegian clinic. We used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to screen for mental health problems. Families of children aged 4-11 took part in the study, and 380 out of 982 possible families consented to take part, and 349 families contributed with questionnaire data. The main referral reasons for the patients were asthma, eneuresis and stomach pain. Mothers reported that 17.4% of boys and 17.8% of girls displayed mental clinical problems. The prevalence of problems did not differ significantly between somatic diagnostic groups. Although the study has low participation, it underlines the necessity of screening all pediatric patients for mental health problems. Future research in pediatric clinics should include factors of psychology because pediatric problems are not caused by somatics alone.
PubMed ID
27538851 View in PubMed
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[Use of children's mental health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150366
Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(9):959-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Päivi Santalahti
Andre Sourander
Piha Jorma
Author Affiliation
Turun yliopisto, lastenpsykiatria, PL 52, 20521 Turku.
Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(9):959-64
Date
2009
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Abstract
According to studies carried out in various countries, many parents (7-28%) contact some professionals due to a child's behavioral or emotional disorder, but a large part of children presenting psychic symptoms has remained outside of mental health services. Seeking for care has strongly increased in Finland over the last few years. Schools and day care centers are important not only in recognizing the problems but also in providing support and directing to specialized services.
PubMed ID
19517864 View in PubMed
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Mental health services use predicted by number of mental health problems and gender in a total population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113758
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2013;2013:247283
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Maj-Britt Posserud
Astri J Lundervold
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. maj-britt.posserud@uni.no
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2013;2013:247283
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Faculty - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Norway - epidemiology
Parents
Prevalence
School Health Services - utilization
Sex Distribution
Students - statistics & numerical data
Utilization Review - methods
Abstract
We examined the relationship between service use and the number of problem areas as reported by parents and teachers on questionnaires among children aged 7-9 years old in the Bergen Child Study, a total population study including more than 9000 children. A problem area was counted as present if the child scored above the 95th percentile on parent and/or teacher questionnaire. A total number of 13 problem areas were included. Odd ratios (ORs) for contact with child and adolescent mental health services (CAMH), school psychology services (SPS), health visiting nurse/physician, and school support were calculated with gender as covariate. The number of symptom areas was highly predictive of service use, showing a dose-response relationship for all services. Children scoring on =4 problem areas had a more than hundredfold risk of being in contact with CAMH services compared to children without problems. The mean number of problem areas for children in CAMH and SPS was 6.1 and 4.4 respectively, strongly supporting the ESSENCE model predicting multisymptomatology in children in specialized services. Even after controlling for number of problem areas, boys were twice as likely as girls to be in contact with CAMH, replicating previous findings of female gender being a strong barrier to mental health services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23690740 View in PubMed
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What is a mental health clinic? How to ask parents about help-seeking contacts within the mental health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158916
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2008 Jul;35(4):241-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Graham J Reid
Juliana I Tobon
Dianne C Shanley
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Family Medicine & Paediatrics, Westminster College, Room 319E, The University of Western Ontario, 361 Windermere Road, London, ON, Canada, N6A 3K7. greid@uwo.ca
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2008 Jul;35(4):241-9
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Disclosure
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
We compared parents' endorsement of having contacted a "mental health clinic or agency" when seeking help for their child, with parents' recognition of having contacted specific, named mental health agencies in their geographic region. Data were from two studies involving parents of children and adolescents seeking mental health services. Across the two studies, only 28 and 41% of parents reported having contacted a "mental health agency," but 100% reported contact when asked about specific agencies by name. Incorporating this simple modification in future studies could provide more accurate documentation of help-seeking for, and utilization of, children's mental health services.
PubMed ID
18259852 View in PubMed
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Involvement of the public health nurse in mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110442
Source
Can J Public Health. 1968 Nov;59(11):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1968

Mental health in Indigenous settings. Challenges for clinicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257191
Source
Aust Fam Physician. 2014 Jan-Feb;43(1):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ernest Hunter
Author Affiliation
MBBS, MPH, MA, MD, FRANZCP, FAFPHM, Diploma of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Regional Psychiatrist, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service and Adjunct Professor, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD.
Source
Aust Fam Physician. 2014 Jan-Feb;43(1):26-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Anxiety - ethnology - therapy
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency
Depression - ethnology - therapy
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Self-Injurious Behavior - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Mental health problems in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are common, changing and challenging. Particularly in remote settings, doctors will need to untangle the complex interplay of culture, context and clinical significance.
This paper emphasises the importance of local knowledge and cultural respect in complementing clinical competence in the management of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with mental health problems.
Anxiety, depression, psychosis, self-harm and problems of childhood and old age are used to exemplify differences by comparison with practice in non-Indigenous populations.
PubMed ID
24563889 View in PubMed
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The need for more children's mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157104
Source
CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1465-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2008
Author
T C R Wilkes
D. Cawthorpe
Source
CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1465-6
Date
May-20-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Feb 13;176(4):417, 41917296945
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Feb 13;176(4):471-217296959
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2007 May-Jun;98(3):174-817626379
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Feb 13;176(4):471-217296959
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Feb 13;176(4):417, 41917296945
PubMed ID
18490643 View in PubMed
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The mental health of immigrant and refugee children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215671
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Mar;40(2):57-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
D R Offord
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Mar;40(2):57-8
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Child
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Personality Development
Quality of Life
Refugees - psychology
Notes
Comment On: Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Mar;40(2):67-727788620
PubMed ID
7788618 View in PubMed
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Rethinking evidence-based practice for children's mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173655
Source
Evid Based Ment Health. 2005 Aug;8(3):60-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
C. Waddell
R. Godderis
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Evaluation and Community Consultation Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, The University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Evid Based Ment Health. 2005 Aug;8(3):60-2
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Mental health
PubMed ID
16043605 View in PubMed
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Mental health delivery in the Soviet Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37288
Source
Alaska Med. 1991 Jan-Mar;33(1):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Source
Alaska Med. 1991 Jan-Mar;33(1):22-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
International Educational Exchange
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Mental Health problems and services in Magadan/Chukotka region were compared with those in Alaska. Both locations have similar geographic and climatic conditions, but have been separated from each other until recently with services developing along different tracks. Recommendations including opportunities for future research are briefly described.
PubMed ID
2053683 View in PubMed
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1798 records – page 1 of 90.