Skip header and navigation

Refine By

810 records – page 1 of 41.

Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quebec child mental health survey: prevalence of DSM-III-R mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202506
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
N. Gaudet
J. Lambert
M. St-Georges
L. Houde
S. Lépine
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des Prairies Hospital and Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manuals as Topic - standards
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parents
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Teaching
Abstract
The Quebec Child Mental Health Survey (QCMHS) was conducted in 1992 on a representative sample of 2400 children and adolescents aged 6 to 14 years from throughout Quebec. Prevalences of nine Axis-I DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) mental health disorders were calculated based on each informant (for 6-11-year-olds: child, parent, and teacher; for 12-14-year-olds: child and parent). Informant parallelism allows the classification of results of the demographic variables associated with disorders in the logistic regression models. This strategy applies to group variables (correlates of disorders) whereas informant agreement applies to individual diagnoses. Informant parallelism implies that results for two informants or more are in the same direction and significant. In the QCMHS, informant parallelism exists for disruptive disorders, i.e. in two ADHD regression models (child and parent) higher rates among boys and young children, and in three oppositional/conduct disorders regression models (child, parent, and teacher) higher rates among boys. No informant parallelism is observed in the logistic regression models for internalizing disorders, i.e. the patterns of association of demographic variables with anxiety and depressive disorders vary across informants. Urban-rural residence does not emerge as a significant variable in any of the logistic regression models. The overall 6-month prevalences reach 19.9% according to the parent and 15.8% according to the child. The implications of the results for policy makers and clinicians are discussed.
PubMed ID
10190339 View in PubMed
Less detail

Wisdom and mental health across the lifespan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117661
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2014 Mar;69(2):209-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Jeffrey Dean Webster
Gerben J Westerhof
Ernst T Bohlmeijer
Author Affiliation
Correspondence should be addressed to Jeffrey Dean Webster, M.Ed., Psychology Department, Langara College, 100 West 49th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V5Y 2Z6. E-mail: jwebster@langara.bc.ca.
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2014 Mar;69(2):209-18
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Human Development - physiology
Humans
Judgment - physiology
Knowledge
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships between wisdom and age and between wisdom and mental health are complex with empirical results often inconsistent. We used a lifespan sample and broad, psychometrically sound measures of wisdom and mental health to test for possible age trends in wisdom and its subcomponents and the relationship between wisdom and hedonic and eudaimonic aspects of well-being.
Participants included 512 Dutch adults ranging in age from 17 to 92 (M age = 46.46, SD = 21.37), including 186 men and 326 women. Participants completed measures of wisdom, physical health, mental health, and personality.
Significant quadratic trends indicated that middle-aged adults scored higher on wisdom than younger and older adults. Investigation of wisdom subcomponents illustrated that a complex pattern of increases and decreases in different aspects of wisdom helped account for these age findings. Bivariate correlations showed the expected positive association between wisdom and mental health. Hierarchic regression analyses indicated that the positive association between wisdom and mental health remained significant after accounting for demographic variables (i.e., sex, age, education) and personality traits (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, and openness to experience).
Age trends in the components of wisdom (older adults higher in life experience but lower in openness relative to younger and middle-aged adults) help explain the curvilinear pattern showing an advantage in wisdom for middle-aged adults. The greater association between wisdom and eudaimonic well-being suggests that wise persons enhance mental health by pursuing meaningful activities.
PubMed ID
23275496 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental health in the middle-aged population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247421
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1979 Mar;59(3):294-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1979
Author
J. Takala
V. Räkköläinen
J. Salminen
K. Sievers
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1979 Mar;59(3):294-305
Date
Mar-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Income
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
In the general health screening carried out 9 September 1973--11 January 1974 in the municipality of Säkylä in Southwest Finland as part of the Säkylä-Köyliö project, the current self-perceived psychological symptomatology of the population between the ages of 40 and 64 years (a total of 2,431 persons) was measured by the questionnaire developed by Goldberg. With a participation rate of 93.3%, the study revealed that 21% of those who took part suffered from psychological symptoms. In the subjects 50 years old or over these symptoms were nearly twice as common as in those under 50 years. Mental symptoms occurred most frequently in widowed and divorced persons as well as in pensioners and the unemployed. An increase in income and/or education appeared to be related to a decline in psychosymptomatology. In the municipality of Köyliö, with a less developed social organization, the frequency of psychological symptoms was 1.5 times that obtained for the more highly developed Säkylä.
PubMed ID
433628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Unemployment and mental health--who is (not) affected?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134297
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Jun;22(3):429-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mona C Backhans
Tomas Hemmingsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mona.backhans@ki.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Jun;22(3):429-33
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupations
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is first, to investigate the association between periods of unemployment and mental distress, adjusting for previous health status, and second, to study differences and similarities between groups defined by age, sex, family situation, socioeconomic position and work environment.
The analyses are based on a cohort of participants in Stockholm county council's Public Health Survey 2002 with a follow-up in 2007. Selected from the initial cohort are respondents 20-59 years who were employed at T1 and had no unemployment in 2001-02. Logistic regression is used and differences between groups are expressed as odds ratios. Interaction analyses are also performed.
Initial odds ratios of 1.84 in the group with 1 year of unemployment or more compared to the reference group with no unemployment is reduced to 1.52 after adjustment for prior mental and somatic health. Analyses show that the impact of unemployment in this sample is stronger for men, those working overtime, those with high social support or low control at their previous job, self-employed and those with low occupational class or low previous wage. Regarding family situation, unemployment is least associated with mental distress among individuals living in couples without children.
Results show an independent effect of unemployment on mental distress, but this effect varies between groups. Both proposed theories: role loss and differential susceptibility, receive some support. Since all interaction analyses are insignificant, results should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
21602222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Immigrants and natives as mental health care recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13184
Source
Ment Health Soc. 1977;4(3-4):171-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
E. Haavio-Mannila
K. Stenius
Source
Ment Health Soc. 1977;4(3-4):171-89
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Age Factors
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - ethnology
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Style
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - utilization
Sex ratio
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Survey results indicate more mental health problems among immigrants than in the native population in Sweden and in one country of departure, Finland. This is reflected in the high proportion of immigrants in the mental hospital studied, but not among psychiatric out-patients. The immigrant patient rate is high even in socially advantageous groups, eg. among married and employed persons. The diagnoses and problems reported in the patient case records of immigrants and natives are compared, with controls for background variables. Some problems, e.g. paranoia, somatic symtoms, and diffuseness of difficulties are clearly related to immigration status but others, eg. alcohol, work, or human relations problems are connected only with social class or sex, irrespective of immigration status.
PubMed ID
614467 View in PubMed
Less detail

The relationship between mental health and drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220189
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Oct;88(4):256-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
J. Takala
O P Ryynänen
E. Lehtovirta
H. Turakka
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Oct;88(4):256-8
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to examine the relationship between mental health and use of different kinds of drugs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of a total population aged 45-69 years, conducted in 2 municipalities in southwestern Finland. Altogether 1821 people (80% of those invited), 815 men and 1006 women, took part in the screening. The subjects were examined by a questionnaire mailed beforehand and checked in a personal interview. The questionnaire contained questions about the currently used drugs and Goldberg's questionnaire on mental health. Half of the people examined used prescribed drugs currently, more women used drugs than men, and the use of drugs increased with age. Mental symptoms measured with the Goldberg Index appeared in one fifth of the subjects, showing a slight increase with age. Men with mental symptoms showed a fourfold psychotropic drug use compared with the men without mental symptoms. The women with mental symptoms showed a threefold use of psychotropic drugs compared with the women without mental symptoms. Similar differences were found also in other drug groups, for example cardiac glycosides, other cardiovascular drugs, analgesics and drugs for respiratory and digestive organs. Persons with mental disorders showed a high tendency to drug use, also when those drugs had no direct attachment to the mental problem. Men seemed more liable to somatization of mental problems than women.
PubMed ID
8256642 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Mental health status of young children (clinico-epidemiological study)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231773
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(8):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
G V Kozlovskaia
G V Skoblo
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(8):58-64
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Mental health
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Moscow
Abstract
The work is based upon a combined prospective investigation into an urban children population aged 0 to 4 years by a group of psychiatrists, neurologists, psychologists and an expert in neurophysiology. The age group under investigation showed a high incidence of mental disorders (10% on average). The authors have singled out some major lines of clinical research into the mental disorders and micropsychiatry including a number of practical issues of improving special therapeutic-preventive assistance to children population.
PubMed ID
2588900 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does rural residence limit access to mental health services?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130046
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(4):1766
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Cindy L Hardy
Karen D Kelly
Don Voaklander
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada. hardy@unbc.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(4):1766
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - therapy
Canada
Educational Status
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - therapy
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Rural residence may reduce access to specialized mental health services. The objective of this study was to examine the role of rural residence in relation to service utilization. Using Canadian data collected in 2002, service use was examined as a function of the presence of anxiety or mood disorders and rural/urban residence. Use of four different types of professional mental health services was examined in relation to rural residence and additional demographic, social, and health status factors known to predict use of services.
Data were obtained from Statistics Canada's Canadian Mental Health Survey Cycle 1.2. Rural residence was defined as living in a rural community with a population of 1000 or less. For all participants, associations between the presence of anxiety or mood disorders, rural/urban residence, and any service use or use of specialized mental health services (psychiatry and psychology) were examined. For participants who had used professional services, associations were examined between 17 predictor variables, including location of residence, and the use of four types of service providers (family doctor or GP; nurse, social worker, counsellor, or psychotherapist; psychiatrist; or psychologist). Predictors included demographic, social, and health status variables. Cross-tabulated counts and adjusted odds ratios with 99% confidence intervals based on bootstrapped variance estimates were used to evaluate predictors.
Among the total sample (n = 35 140), 7.9% had used professional mental health services in the previous year. Among people who were likely to have had anxiety or mood disorders, rural or urban residence was not differentially related to past-year use of any professional services or specialized mental health services. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model factors predicting past year use of four different types of professional services. Location of residence was not a significant predictor of service utilization. Age, sex, race, level of education, degree of psychological distress, chronicity of distress, and the presence of anxiety or mood disorders predicted type of service used.
The notion that rural residence limits access to mental health services was not supported. Other demographic and health status indicators such as age, sex, race, education, distress, and type of illness were more important predictors of service utilization. However, null findings related to geographic residence must be interpreted cautiously due to the small sample of rural residents who sought mental health services. The mental health system in Canada must provide a variety of professional services in order to meet the preferences of diverse groups, and mental health specialists must find ways to adequately support general practice physicians and counsellors who provide mental health services.
PubMed ID
22039894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Two Eskimo villages assess mental health strengths and needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1741
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 1990; 4(2):7-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
TWO ESKIMO VILLAGES ASSESS MENTAL HEALTH STRENGTHS AND NEEDS BARBARA A. MINTON, Ph.D. and SUSAN SOULE, M.A. Abstract: Due to a growing consensus of the inadequacy of the current mental health system in rural Alaska, an assessment of mental health strengths and needs was conducted in two Eskimo
  1 document  
Author
Minton, B.A.
Soule, S.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Southeast
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 1990; 4(2):7-24.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1009465
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Attitudes
Mental health
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska
Delivery of Health Care
Depression
Female
Happiness
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Abstract
Due to a growing consensus of the inadequacy of the current mental health system in rural Alaska, an assessment of mental health strengths and needs was conducted in two Eskimo villages. Respondents were 216 Eskimos who completed a structured interview. Results document perceptions of problems and strengths unique to the village cultures and settings. To increase effectiveness, programs must take into account the perspectives expressed by village people.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2305.
Documents

42_Minton_Two_Eskimo_Villages_7-24.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Overrepresentation of adopted children attending a children's mental health centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236712
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1986 Aug;31(6):526-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1986
Author
L. Jerome
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1986 Aug;31(6):526-31
Date
Aug-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption
Age Factors
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
A retrospective analysis was made of case records of children attending a Children's Mental Health Centre during the years 1959 to 1973. Annual comparisons were made between the numbers of adopted children seen in the province of Ontario and within the clinic setting. The results indicated that over a fifteen year period the adopted children in the clinic were seen with twice the expected annual incidence predicted from the community rates.
PubMed ID
3756755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Explaining mental health inequalities in Northern Sweden: a decomposition analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295076
Source
Glob Health Action. 2017; 10(1):1305814
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Nada Amroussia
Per E Gustafsson
Paola A Mosquera
Author Affiliation
a Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2017; 10(1):1305814
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
There has been a substantial increase of income inequalities in Sweden over the last 20 years, which also could be reflected in health inequalities, including mental health inequalities. Despite the growing body of literature focusing on health inequalities in Sweden, income-related inequalities in mental health have received little attention. Particularly scarce are research from Northern Sweden and examinations of the social determinants of health inequalities.
The present study seeks to provide evidence regarding inequalities in mental health in Northern Sweden. The specific aims were to (1) quantify the income-related inequality in mental health in Northern Sweden, and (2) determine the contribution of social determinants to the inequality.
The study population comprised 25,646 participants of the 2014 Health on Equal Terms survey in the four northernmost counties of Sweden, aged 16 to 84 years old. Income-related inequalities in mental health were quantified by the concentration index and further decomposed by applying Wagstaff-type decomposition analysis.
The overall concentration index of mental health in Northern Sweden was -0.15 (95% CI: -0.17 to -0.13), indicating income inequalities in mental health disfavoring the less affluent population. The decomposition analysis results revealed that socio-economic conditions, including employment status (31%), income (22.6%), and cash margin (14%), made the largest contribution to the pro-rich inequalities in mental health. The second-largest contribution came from demographic factors, mainly age (11.3%) and gender (6%). Psychosocial factors were of smaller importance, with perceived discrimination (8%) and emotional support (3.4%) making moderate contributions to the health inequalities.
The present study demonstrates substantial income-related mental health inequalities in Northern Sweden, and provides insights into their underpinnings. These findings suggest that addressing the root causes is essential for promoting mental health equity in this region.
Notes
Cites: Health Policy. 2007 Oct;83(2-3):186-95 PMID 17316884
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jan;21(1-2):111-20 PMID 22017561
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;50(7):1111-20 PMID 25106666
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;190:75-6 PMID 17197660
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jun;38(4):404-10 PMID 20215484
Cites: J Health Econ. 2003 Mar;22(2):295-312 PMID 12606147
Cites: J Health Econ. 2013 May;32(3):659-70 PMID 23522656
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2016 Jan;149:135-44 PMID 26717560
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2016 Jan 26;15:17 PMID 26810112
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Dec;68(12):1145-50 PMID 25143429
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Dec;147:324-31 PMID 26623942
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Oct;99(10):1856-63 PMID 19150915
Cites: Ethn Health. 2010 Apr;15(2):121-43 PMID 20131130
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2012 Mar 26;11:18 PMID 22449237
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010 Jun 09;10:326 PMID 20534136
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Dec;43(8):833-40 PMID 26229073
Cites: Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):479-89 PMID 16162419
Cites: Psychol Med. 2011 Jul;41(7):1365-72 PMID 21144109
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 May 08;12:337 PMID 22568888
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Aug;43(16 Suppl):66-72 PMID 26311802
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Aug;43(6):563-70 PMID 25964124
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):7-17 PMID 24135426
Cites: J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2014 Dec;29(4):353-69 PMID 25349021
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Aug 28;5(8):e006581 PMID 26319773
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1964-72 PMID 20943303
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2008 Dec 24;7:27 PMID 19108724
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Oct 11;11:788 PMID 21989478
Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2012 Aug;24(4):356-62 PMID 22950776
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Jan 11;14:29 PMID 24410750
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Nov;134(1-3):160-7 PMID 21665286
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Sep 15;380(9846):1011-29 PMID 22964159
Cites: Health Syst Transit. 2012;14(5):1-159 PMID 22894859
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Apr;61(4):331-6 PMID 17372294
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009 Aug 20;9:302 PMID 19695085
Cites: Psychol Med. 2007 Jul;37(7):1037-45 PMID 17202002
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2009;39(2):271-85 PMID 19492625
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Apr 23;14:394 PMID 24758209
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2016 Mar;153:27-34 PMID 26874080
PubMed ID
28562191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Boarding schools: effects on the mental health of Eskimo adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1340
Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 1977 Apr;134(4):411-417.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Kleinfeld, J.
Bloom, J.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 1977 Apr;134(4):411-417.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Boarding school
Health Opinion Survey
Achievement
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Age Factors
Alaska
Educational Status
Humans
Inuits
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Schools
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Social Environment
Students
Abstract
Whether boarding schools undermine the mental health of Eskimo and Indian children has been a bitterly debated issue. The authors examined the effects of four representative boarding schools on 132 Alaskan Eskimo adolescents during their freshman and sophomore years. Forty-nine percent of the freshmen developed school-related social and emotional disturbances; 25% of these problems were judged serious. High levels of emotional disturbance were also found during the students' sophomore year. Although simple environmental changes may temporarily reduce the rate of disturbance among students, the long-term effects of boarding schools may still be deleterious.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2298.
Less detail

The mental health of canadians with self-reported learning disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153535
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2009 Jan-Feb;42(1):24-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexander M Wilson
Catherine Deri Armstrong
Adele Furrie
Elizabeth Walcot
Author Affiliation
Mount Allison University, Canada.
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2009 Jan-Feb;42(1):24-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Canada
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Dyslexia - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Support
Suicide - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
There has been growing concern as to the mental health status of persons with learning disabilities (PWLD). This study examined rates of mental health problems among PWLD aged 15 to 44 years using a large, nationally representative data set. PWLD were more than twice as likely to report high levels of distress, depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal thoughts, visits to mental health professionals, and poorer overall mental health than were persons without disabilities (PWOD). Multivariate regression analyses determined that these significantly higher rates of mental health problems remained for all six measures after controlling for confounding factors including income, education, social support, and physical health. Differences found in the older adult sample (ages 30-44) were even larger than in the adolescent sample (ages 15-21) for suicidal thoughts, depression, and distress. Males with learning disabilities were more likely to report depressive episodes, anxiety disorders, and consultations with health professionals, whereas females with learning disabilities were more likely to report high distress, suicidal thoughts, and poor general mental health relative to PWOD. On balance, learning disabilities were not found to be more detrimental to mental health for one gender or the other.
PubMed ID
19103798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early puberty is associated with mental health problems in middle adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184354
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Sep;57(6):1055-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Mauri Marttunen
Päivi Rantanen
Matti Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, 33014 University of Tampere, Box 607, 33101 Tampere, Finland. merihe@uta.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Sep;57(6):1055-64
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Age Factors
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Puberty - physiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Schools
Abstract
This study set out to assess the relationship between pubertal timing and emotional and behavioural problems in middle adolescence. The study involved a school based survey of health, health behaviour and behaviour in school as well as questions about emotional and behavioural problems (the School Health Promotion Study). Secondary schools in four regions and 13 towns in Finland participated in the study in 1998. The respondents were 36,549 adolescents aged 14-16. The study included questions on depression, bulimia nervosa, psychosomatic symptoms, anxiety, drinking, substance use, smoking, bullying and truancy. Among girls, both internalising and externalising symptoms were more common the earlier puberty occurred. Among boys, externalising symptoms only were associated with early puberty. It is concluded that early pubertal timing is associated with increased mental health problems. Professionals working with adolescents should consider the mental health needs of early maturing adolescents.
PubMed ID
12878105 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cultural consultation: a model of mental health service for multicultural societies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185540
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;48(3):145-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Laurence J Kirmayer
Danielle Groleau
Jaswant Guzder
Caminee Blake
Eric Jarvis
Author Affiliation
Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University, Culture and Mental Health Research Unit, Sir Mortimer B Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec. laurence.kirmayer@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;48(3):145-53
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cultural Diversity
Culture
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Psychiatry - education - standards
Psychology, Clinical - education - standards
Public Policy
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Sex Factors
Abstract
This paper reports results from the evaluation of a cultural consultation service (CCS) for mental health practitioners and primary care clinicians. The service was designed to improve the delivery of mental health services in mainstream settings for a culturally diverse urban population including immigrants, refugees, and ethnocultural minority groups. Cultural consultations were based on an expanded version of the DSM-IV cultural formulation and made use of cultural consultants and culture brokers.
We documented the service development process through participant observation. We systematically evaluated the first 100 cases referred to the service to establish the reasons for consultation, the types of cultural formulations and recommendations, and the consultation outcome in terms of the referring clinician's satisfaction and recommendation concordance.
Cases seen by the CCS clearly demonstrated the impact of cultural misunderstandings: incomplete assessments, incorrect diagnoses, inadequate or inappropriate treatment, and failed treatment alliances. Clinicians referring patients to the service reported high rates of satisfaction with the consultations, but many indicated a need for long-term follow-up.
The cultural consultation model effectively supplements existing services to improve diagnostic assessment and treatment for a culturally diverse urban population. Clinicians need training in working with interpreters and culture brokers.
PubMed ID
12728738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is cultural activity at work related to mental health in employees?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125743
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Apr;86(3):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Töres Theorell
Walter Osika
Constanze Leineweber
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Eva Bojner Horwitz
Hugo Westerlund
Author Affiliation
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Fack 710632, R 017, SE-106 54 Stockholm, Sweden. tores.theorell@stressforskning.su.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Apr;86(3):281-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Art
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Prospective Studies
Sex
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine relationships between work-based cultural activities and mental employee health in working Swedes.
A positive relationship between frequent cultural activity at work and good employee health was expected.
Random sample of working Swedish men and women in three waves, 2006, 2008 and 2010, on average 60 % participation rate.
A postal questionnaire with questions about cultural activities organised for employees and about emotional exhaustion (Maslach) and depressive symptoms (short form of SCL). Employee assessments of "non-listening manager" and work environment ("psychological demands" and "decision latitude") as well as socioeconomic variables were covariates. Cross-sectional analyses for each study year as well as prospective analyses for 2006-2008 and 2008-2010 were performed.
Lower frequency of cultural activities at work during the period of high unemployment. The effects of relationships with emotional exhaustion were more significant than those with depressive symptoms. The associations were attenuated when adjustments were made for manager function (does your manager listen?) and demand/control. Associations were more pronounced during the period with low unemployment and high cultural activity at work (2008). In a prospective analysis, cultural activity at work in 2008 had an independent statistically significant "protective" effect on emotional exhaustion in 2010. No corresponding such association was found between 2006 and 2008.
Cultural activities at work vary according to business cycle and have a statistical association with mental employee health, particularly with emotional exhaustion.
There are particularly pronounced statistical protective effects of frequent cultural activity at work on likelihood of emotional exhaustion among employees.
Notes
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:13021345187
Cites: Ind Health. 2011;49(4):501-1021697618
Cites: Psychother Psychosom. 2011;80(2):78-8721196805
Cites: J Health Hum Serv Adm. 1999 Spring;21(4):472-8910621016
Cites: J R Soc Promot Health. 2001 Dec;121(4):248-5611811096
Cites: Integr Physiol Behav Sci. 2003 Jan-Mar;38(1):65-7412814197
Cites: Psychother Psychosom. 2010;79(3):196-820234152
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Dec 21-28;313(7072):1577-808990990
Cites: J Behav Med. 2004 Dec;27(6):623-3515669447
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Sep;36(7):737-4318684778
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Nov;36(8):803-1119004898
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2009 May;71(4):469-7319321851
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2009 Aug;82(8):951-6019238422
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1988 Jun;14(3):189-963393855
PubMed ID
22456978 View in PubMed
Less detail

810 records – page 1 of 41.