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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
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A 1-year follow up of psychological wellbeing after subtotal and total hysterectomy--a randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98373
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Persson, P
Brynhildsen, J
Kjølhede, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. par.persson@akademiska.se
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare subtotal abdominal hysterectomy (SH) and total abdominal hysterectomy (TH) regarding influence on postoperative psychological wellbeing and surgical outcome measurements. DESIGN: A prospective, open, randomised multicentre trial. SETTING: Seven hospitals and one private clinic in the south-east of Sweden. POPULATION: Two-hundred women scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy for benign conditions were enrolled in the study; 179 women completed the study (94 SH and 85 TH). METHODS: Four different psychometric tests were used to measure general wellbeing, depression and anxiety preoperatively, and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Statistical analysis of variance and covariance were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of operating method on psychological wellbeing postoperatively. Analysis of demographic, clinical and surgical data, including peri- and postoperative complications and complaints at follow up. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between the two groups in any of the psychometric tests. Both surgical methods were associated with a significantly higher degree of psychological wellbeing at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, compared with preoperatively. No significant differences were found in the clinical measures including complications. A substantial number of women experienced persistent cyclic vaginal bleedings after SH. Neither minor or major postoperative complications, nor serum concentration of sex hormones, were associated with general psychological wellbeing 12 months after the operation. CONCLUSIONS: General psychological wellbeing is equally improved after both SH and TH within 12 months of the operation, and does not seem to be associated with the occurrence of peroperative complications or serum concentration of sex hormones.
PubMed ID
20074265 View in PubMed
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[2 chief physicians agree with the Danish Nursing Council: a great need for nurses in services for the mentally deficient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248696
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1978 Apr 5;78(13):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-1978
Author
L H Duysen
G. Dahl
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1978 Apr 5;78(13):23-4
Date
Apr-5-1978
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Intellectual Disability - nursing
Mental Health Services - manpower
PubMed ID
247715 View in PubMed
Less detail

[2 cities or: Contrasts within mental deficiency care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43050
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1974 Mar 11;136(11):611-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1974

[2d Report from Sandnes: psychiatric home nursing a gain for primary health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246570
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1979
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Date
Dec-5-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Home Care Services
Humans
Norway
Primary Health Care
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
260372 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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[3rd Report from Birgitta Hospital: care project and reaction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256327
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Apr 14;68(16):1826-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1971

A 4-year review of pediatric mental health emergencies in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148300
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Amanda S Newton
Samina Ali
David W Johnson
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Rachel A Keaschuk
Philip Jacobs
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. mandi.newton@ualberta.ca
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We sought to determine and compare rates of pediatric mental health presentations and associated costs in emergency departments (EDs) in Alberta.
We examined 16 154 presentations by 12 589 patients (patient age
PubMed ID
19788789 View in PubMed
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5HTR2A gene polymorphism and personality traits in patients with major psychoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190821
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
V E Golimbet
M V Alfimova
K K Manandyan
N G Mitushina
L I Abramova
V G Kaleda
I V Oleichik
YuB Yurov
V I Trubnikov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Preventive Genetics, Research Mental Health Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Zagorodnoe sh. 2/2, Moscow, Russia 113152. golimbet@mail.ru
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Personality - genetics
Personality Inventory
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - genetics
Receptors, Serotonin - genetics
Abstract
Serotonin receptor (5HTR2A) gene polymorphism has been reported to be associated with clinical phenotypes in schizophrenia. The current study attempted to investigate a relationship between 5HTR2A 102T/C polymorphism and personality traits as well as clinical symptoms in patients with ICD-10 diagnoses of schizophrenia and affective disorders. 5HTR2A genotyping, clinical and psychological assessment were administered to 375 patients, 104 first-degree healthy relatives of the patients and 157 controls. In the patients an association was observed between the 2/2 5HTR2A genotype and scores on the Hypochondriasis scale (MMPI) (ANOVA, F = 4.56; P = 0.011) and trait anxiety (F = 4.21; P = 0.002). A significant difference between 1/1 and 2/2 genotypes has been also found for Neuroticism scores (EPI) (t = 2.18; P = 0.0031). No significant differences by 5HTR2A genotype were observed in either the control or first-degree relatives group for all scales studied. Positive, negative and psychopathological symptoms emerged higher in the 2/2 genotype patients compared to other genotype carriers. Therefore, the 2/2 genotype may contribute to produce the phenotype, with specific clinical and pathological features in common, regardless of nosologic heterogeneity of psychoses.
PubMed ID
11918989 View in PubMed
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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012 Plenary Speaker Joe Sarcone, MS Regional Representative – Alaska, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, igg5@cdc.gov A story of science and the application of human
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of aggression at work and psychological health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51790
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Annie Hogh
Marie Engström Henriksson
Hermann Burr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ah@ami.dk
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Workplace
Abstract
In a longitudinal cohort study, organizational climate and long-term effects of exposure to nasty teasing (aggression) at work were investigated. The baseline consisted of a representative sample of Danish employees in 1995 with a response rate of 80% (N = 5,652). Of these, 4,647 participated in the follow-up in 2000 (response rate 84%). In 1995, 6.3% were subjected to nasty teasing with no significant gender difference. At baseline, we found significant associations among nasty teasing, a negative organizational climate, and psychological health effects. In the follow-up analyses, associations were found between exposure to nasty teasing at baseline and psychological health problems at follow-up, even when controlled for organizational climate and psychological health at baseline and nasty teasing at follow-up. Stratified for gender, the follow-up associations were significant for women but not for men. Low coworker support and conflicts at baseline and teasing at follow-up mediated the effects on men.
PubMed ID
16262544 View in PubMed
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A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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[10,850 general practice consultations with elderly patients. From diagnosis-prescription-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72639
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
K. Rokstad
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. Participation was close to 100%. We report data from 10,850 surgery consultations with elderly patients (65 years and older). 60% of the consultations involved female patients, and 58% of the patients were 65-74 years old. New diagnoses were made in one-third of the cases; two-thirds were follow-ups. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (28%), musculoskeletal (13%), psychiatric (8%) and respiratory diseases (8%). Almost 10% of all consultations were for hypertension. Drugs were prescribed in 45% of all cases. 27% of all prescriptions were for cardiovascular drugs, and 25% were for drugs for the nervous system. The 20 most common diagnoses made up more than half of the total number of diagnoses. Almost 70% of all prescriptions were for the ten most common therapeutic groups.
PubMed ID
9441427 View in PubMed
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10-year trends of educational differences in long sickness absence due to mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285500
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2017
Author
Hilla Sumanen
Olli Pietiläinen
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Date
Jul-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - classification - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental disorders are a key cause of sickness absence (SA) and challenge prolonging working careers. Thus, evidence on the development of SA trends is needed. In this study, educational differences in long SAs due to mental disorders were examined in two age groups among employees of the City of Helsinki from 2004 to 2013.
All permanently and temporarily employed staff aged 18-34 and 35-49 were included in the analyses (n=~27800 per year). SA spells of =14 days due to mental disorders were examined annually. Education was classified to higher and lower levels. Joinpoint regression was used to identify major turning points in SA trends.
Joinpoint regression models showed that lower educated groups had more long SAs spells due to mental disorders than those groups with higher education. SA trends decreased during the study period in all studied age and educational groups. Lower educated age groups had similar SA trends. Younger employees with higher education had the fewest SAs.
A clear educational gradient was found in long SAs due to mental disorders during the study period. SA trends decreased from 2004 to 2013.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28496028 View in PubMed
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