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Perceived job insecurity and perceived employability in relation to temporary and permanent workers' psychological symptoms: a two samples study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136149
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Dec;84(8):899-909
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Kaisa Kirves
Nele De Cuyper
Ulla Kinnunen
Jouko Nätti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, 33014, Tampere, Finland. kaisa.kirves@uta.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Dec;84(8):899-909
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavioral Symptoms - psychology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Superstitions
Uncertainty
Workplace
Abstract
To clarify the role of perceived job insecurity and perceived employability in relation to psychological symptoms among permanent and temporary employees in two samples. Sample 1 was representative of the Finnish working population in 2008 (n = 4,330; Study 1). Sample 2 was collected among Finnish university personnel and in two waves (n = 1,212; Study 2).
Perceived job insecurity, perceived employability, and psychological symptoms were measured by questionnaires in both studies. Hypotheses were tested with regression analyses.
The pattern of results was similar in the two samples. Perceived job insecurity was positively associated with psychological symptoms among permanent workers but not among temporary workers. No such differential relationships were observed for perceived employability, instead perceived employability was negatively associated with psychological symptoms among all respondents. Furthermore, perceived employability did not buffer the positive relation between perceived job insecurity and psychological symptoms.
Knowledge about the relationship between contract type and workers' well-being can be enhanced when the combined effects of contract type and job conditions are accounted for.
PubMed ID
21409452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental health in complex health promotion policy programmes: the contribution of programme evaluations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136159
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):255-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Pia Solin
Juhani Lehto
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland. pia.solin@uta.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):255-61
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England
Finland
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Mental health
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Public Health
Abstract
In order to develop policymaking, evaluation is required. The research project studied national health promotion policies concentrating on mental health promotion policy. In this paper the focus is on the position of evaluation.
To explore the position of evaluation in the development of the national public health strategies of England and Finland and particularly with regard to mental health promotion policies. The evaluation phase of the policymaking process is also scrutinised through multiple streams of policy change.
Meta-evaluative approach applying a conceptual framework of policy analysis.
Evaluations of national health strategies were executed in both countries. These evaluations entailed multiple tasks; not only to monitor the progress of the targets but to learn for the future in a wider perspective. Aims of mental health policy are not easily turned into quantitative targets and therefore outcome evaluation was not felt to be satisfactory as it lacks focus on process as well as null, perverse, and unintended consequences.
While the position of evaluation is almost always more complicated than is assumed in so-called rational policymaking theory, mental health appears to be even more challenging in this respect. Possibilities for alternative evaluation strategies should be studied further.
PubMed ID
21406479 View in PubMed
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Psychological distress and quality of life in long-term social assistance recipients compared to the Norwegian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136161
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):303-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Borghild Løyland
Christine Miaskowski
Espen Dahl
Steven M Paul
Tone Rustøen
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Borghild.Loyland@su.hio.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):303-11
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Public Assistance
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis
Time Factors
Abstract
Mental disorders are serious public health problems and mental disorders have an impact on individuals' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate for differences in psychological distress and HRQoL outcomes between long-term social assistance recipients (LTRs) and the general population in Norway. In addition, differences in HRQoL outcomes were evaluated in LTRs and general population who reported clinically meaningful levels of psychological distress.
In this cross-sectional study, which is part of a larger study that evaluated the health and functional abilities of LTRs in Norway, 393 LTRs were compared to a similar aged group (n = 3919) from the general population. Psychological distress was measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist.
LTRs were significantly younger (p 1.85 reported lower mental component scores on the SF-12 than general population.
In the total sample, LTRs experienced more psychological distress and reported poorer HRQoL than the general population. Clinically meaningful levels of psychological distress occurred more frequently in LTRs than general population. The LTRs and the general population with psychological distress rated both the physical and mental components of HRQoL lower than LTRs and general population without psychological distress.
PubMed ID
21406477 View in PubMed
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Partner relationship satisfaction and maternal emotional distress in early pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136195
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:161
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Gun-Mette B Røsand
Kari Slinning
Malin Eberhard-Gran
Espen Røysamb
Kristian Tambs
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. gbro@fhi.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:161
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Young Adult
Abstract
Recognition of maternal emotional distress during pregnancy and the identification of risk factors for this distress are of considerable clinical- and public health importance. The mental health of the mother is important both for herself, and for the physical and psychological health of her children and the welfare of the family. The first aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for maternal emotional distress during pregnancy with special focus on partner relationship satisfaction. The second aim was to assess interaction effects between relationship satisfaction and the main predictors.
Pregnant women enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n = 51,558) completed a questionnaire with questions about maternal emotional distress, relationship satisfaction, and other risk factors. Associations between 37 predictor variables and emotional distress were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis.
Relationship dissatisfaction was the strongest predictor of maternal emotional distress (ß = 0.25). Other predictors were dissatisfaction at work (ß = 0.11), somatic disease (ß = 0.11), work related stress (ß = 0.10) and maternal alcohol problems in the preceding year (ß = 0.09). Relationship satisfaction appeared to buffer the effects of frequent moving, somatic disease, maternal smoking, family income, irregular working hours, dissatisfaction at work, work stress, and mother's sick leave (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21401914 View in PubMed
Less detail

Initial prescription of antipsychotics and antidepressants in general practice and specialist care in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136202
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
S R Kjosavik
S. Hunskaar
D. Aarsland
S. Ruths
Author Affiliation
Research Group for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. svein.kjosavik@isf.uib.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):459-65
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the incidence rates of antipsychotic (AP) and antidepressant (AD) drug treatment in Norway and the proportions initiated in general practice and specialist care respectively.
Data on all prescriptions of APs and ADs dispensed to the general population in Norway from 1 January 2004 until 31 August 2009 were extracted from the Norwegian Prescription Database. This information was merged with data about general practitioners (GPs) from the Norwegian Regular General Practitioner Scheme.
One-year incidence rates per 1000 inhabitants were 3.4 for APs and 8.6 for ADs. GPs initiated 58% of APs and 73% of ADs, while psychiatrists initiated 15% and 6% respectively. Psychiatrists initiated treatment more often among younger patients, and they prescribed relatively newer drugs more commonly than GPs. A large share of incident users did not refill their prescriptions for APs (57%) or ADs (33%).
GPs have a key role as regards initiating treatment with APs and ADs in Norway, while psychiatrists' influence seems limited, particularly among older patients. Efforts for quality improvement of mental health care need to involve primary health care. In addition, an increased focus from psychiatrists towards the increasingly ageing part of the population seems requisite.
PubMed ID
21401533 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of specific phobia and subthreshold fear subtypes in a community-based sample of older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136221
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2011 Jun;28(6):456-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Sébastien Grenier
Josien Schuurmans
Maria Goldfarb
Michel Préville
Richard Boyer
Kieron O'Connor
Olivier Potvin
Carol Hudon
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Hôpital Charles LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, Québec, Canada. grenier.sebastien@uqam.ca
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2011 Jun;28(6):456-63
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Fear
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Quebec
Abstract
Specific phobias have received little attention among older adults. This study is aimed at determining the 12-month prevalence rates of fear subtypes in older adults with a full or subthreshold DSM diagnosis of specific phobia as well as to examine differences among these conditions according to health and health behavior characteristics potentially associated with the severity of anxious symptoms.
Data came from a representative sample of community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older (N = 2784). Diagnoses were established by in-home semi-structured interviews. DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia were slightly modified in line with recommendations for DSM-V.
The 12-month prevalence rates of specific phobias and subthreshold fears were, respectively, 2.0 and 8.7%. More than half of the respondents with a specific phobia did not recognize the "excessiveness" of their fears. Situational and natural environment fears were the most frequent subtypes. Compared to respondents with no symptoms of anxiety, older adults with a full- or subthreshold-specific phobia reported more chronic physical health problems, more comorbid depressive disorders and a higher use of benzodiazepines. However, older adults with specific phobia reported more comorbid anxiety disorders than respondents with subthreshold fears.
The present study provides evidence for the fact that subthreshold fears have a high prevalence among older adults. Since several older people with specific phobia do not recognize the "excessiveness" of their fears, it is recommended that DSM-V criteria allow clinicians to rely on their own judgment to assess whether the perceived danger is out of proportion.
PubMed ID
21400642 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with disability and depressive symptoms among individuals with diabetes: a community study in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136257
Source
Psychosomatics. 2011 Mar-Apr;52(2):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Author
Norbert Schmitz
Lyne Messier
Danit Nitka
Anna Ivanova
Genevieve Gariepy
Jianli Wang
Ashok Malla
Richard Boyer
Alain Lesage
Irene Strychar
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. norbert.schmitz@mcgill.ca
Source
Psychosomatics. 2011 Mar-Apr;52(2):167-77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
The prevalence of diabetes in Canada is increasing. Multiple factors have been identified in the development of disability in diabetic patients, but the interaction of those risk factors is not clear.
The purpose of this paper was to assess the association between diabetes severity, health behavior, socioeconomic status, social support, depression, and disability simultaneously in a population-based study of individuals with diabetes in Quebec, Canada.
Random digit dialing was used to select a sample of 2,003 adults with self-reported diabetes in Quebec. Health status was assessed by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II and the CDC Healthy Days Measures. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression. Potential risk factors included diabetes severity, social support, socioeconomic status, and health behavior factors. Structural equation models were used to identify risk factors that contributed to both depressive symptoms and disability.
The prevalence of major and minor depression was 8.7% and 10.9%, respectively, while the prevalence of severe disability was 6.7%. Diabetes severity and health behavior factors were associated with both depression and disability. Social support was associated with depression for women but not for men.
Our results suggest a complex interaction between health behavior factors, diabetes severity, social support, depression, and disability. Behavioral factors and diabetes-specific factors might have a direct effect on both depression and physical functioning.
PubMed ID
21397110 View in PubMed
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Usefulness of internet in adolescent mental health outpatient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136264
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;18(3):265-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
M. Kurki
M. Koivunen
M. Anttila
H. Hätönen
M. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. marjo.kurki@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;18(3):265-73
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Attitude to Computers
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet
Mental Disorders - nursing
Middle Aged
Nurse's Practice Patterns
Nurse-Patient Relations
Psychiatric Nursing
Abstract
Internet has become increasingly common in adolescents' daily lives and also in health care. However, there is still need to explore how nurses perceive its use as a part of adolescents' treatment. This explorative qualitative study aim was to explore how nurses perceive the usefulness of Internet in adolescents' outpatient care in mental health. The data were collected among nurses (n=12) working in two psychiatric adolescent outpatient clinics in university central hospitals in Finland. The data were collected in focus group interviews and analysed using inductive content analysis. The analysis showed that Internet use could promote the care process of adolescents with depression by supporting their self-reflection and self-management, enhancing nurses' understanding of adolescents' daily lives and facilitating nurse-adolescent interaction. Disadvantages identified among nurses were fear of role changes in the nurse-adolescent interaction, changes in the intervention, when Internet might be a third party in the face-to-face interaction and negative effects of Internet on adolescents. Facilitators in the use of Internet were nurses' positive attitude to Internet, knowledge and experiences of Internet usage. Nurses' negative attitude to Internet and lack of training and instructions were seen as barriers in promoting the successful utilization of Internet among adolescents with depression in outpatient care.
PubMed ID
21395918 View in PubMed
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Canadian military transitioning to civilian life: a discussion paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136265
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;18(3):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
S L Ray
K. Heaslip
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, London, ON, Canada. slray@uwo.ca
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Apr;18(3):198-204
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Cultural Competency
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nursing Care
Social Adjustment
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this discussion paper is to explore the existing literature from Canada on transitioning from military to civilian life for veterans of recent deployments. A number of topics relating to the transition experience emerged: interpersonal readjustment, emotional including mental health needs, school needs, and social needs. Implications for nursing will be discussed in terms of veterans as a cultural group and culturally competent nursing care. Recommendations for future nursing research include how well current services are meeting the needs of the younger, more recent veterans transitioning to civilian life; conducting longitudinal studies on the impact of transitioning to civilian life for veterans and their families; comparing the transition experience at an international level; developing a transition model that situates the veteran culture as the overarching framework for testing and understanding the experience of transitioning to civilian life.
PubMed ID
21395911 View in PubMed
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The effect of five years versus two years of specialised assertive intervention for first episode psychosis - OPUS II: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136300
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marianne Melau
Pia Jeppesen
Anne Thorup
Mette Bertelsen
Lone Petersen
Christian Gluud
Gertrud Krarup
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark. marianne.melau@regionh.dk
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cognitive Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Family Therapy
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Research Design
Social Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish OPUS I trial randomized 547 patients with first-episode psychosis to a two-year early-specialised assertive treatment programme (OPUS) versus standard treatment. The two years OPUS treatment had significant positive effects on psychotic and negative symptoms, secondary substance abuse, treatment adherence, lower dosage of antipsychotic medication, and a higher treatment satisfaction. However, three years after end of the OPUS treatment, the positive clinical effects were not sustained, except that OPUS-treated patients were significantly less likely to be institutionalised compared with standard-treated patients. The major objective of the OPUS II trial is to evaluate the effects of five years of OPUS treatment versus two years of OPUS treatment.
The OPUS II trial is designed as a randomized, open label, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Based on our sample size estimation, 400 patients treated in OPUS for two years will be randomized to further three years of OPUS treatment versus standard treatment. The specialized assertive OPUS treatment consists of three core elements: assertive community treatment, psycho-educational family treatment, and social skills training.
It has been hypothesized that there is a critical period from onset up to five years, which represents a window of opportunity where a long-term course can be influenced. Extending the specialized assertive OPUS treatment up to five years may allow the beneficial effects to continue beyond the high-risk period, through consolidation of improved social and functional outcome.
Clinical Trial.gov NCT00914238.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21392377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Response to atomoxetine in boys with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136301
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Sep;100(9):1258-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Pål Zeiner
Elen Gjevik
Bernhard Weidle
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. pzeiner@online.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Sep;100(9):1258-61
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Propylamines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To study the efficacy and tolerability of atomoxetine in high-functioning boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD).
Fourteen boys (age 7-17) participated in a 10-week open-label study. Atomoxetine doses were 0.5 mg/kg/day in week 1 and 1.2-1.4 mg/kg/day in weeks 2-10. Changes in AD/HD symptoms were measured by the AD/HD Rating Scale, and global improvements by the Clinical Global Improvement Scale. Both measures were used to assess drug response. Assessments were done at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 6 and 10. Teacher ratings were done at baseline and 10 weeks.
There were significant reductions in AD/HD symptoms rated by parents (p
PubMed ID
21392103 View in PubMed
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High prevalence of childhood emotional, physical and sexual trauma among a Canadian cohort of HIV-seropositive illicit drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136315
Source
AIDS Care. 2011 Jun;23(6):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Georgia Walton
Steven J Co
M-J Milloy
Jiezhi Qi
Thomas Kerr
Evan Wood
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2011 Jun;23(6):714-21
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Female
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The psychosocial impacts of various types of childhood maltreatment on vulnerable illicit drug-using populations remain unclear. We examined the prevalence and correlates of antecedent emotional, physical and sexual abuse among a community-recruited cohort of adult HIV-seropositive illicit drug users.
We estimated the prevalence of childhood abuse at baseline using data from the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, a 28-item validated instrument used to retrospectively assess childhood maltreatment. Logistic regression was used to estimate relationships between sub-types of childhood maltreatment with various social-demographic, drug-using and clinical characteristics.
Overall, 233 HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU) were included in the analysis, including 83 (35.6%) women. Of these, moderate or severe emotional childhood abuse was reported by 51.9% of participants, emotional neglect by 36.9%, physical abuse by 51.1%, physical neglect by 46.8% and sexual abuse by 41.6%. In multivariate analyses, emotional, physical and sexual abuses were independently associated with greater odds of recent incarceration. Emotional abuse and neglect were independently associated with a score of =16 on the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. There was no association between any form of childhood maltreatment and clinical HIV variables, including viral load, CD4+ count and history of antiretroviral therapy use.
These findings underscore the negative impact of childhood maltreatment on social functioning and mental health in later life. Given the substantial prevalence of childhood maltreatment among this population, there is a need for evidence-based resources to address the deleterious effect it has on the health and social functioning of HIV-positive IDU.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21390877 View in PubMed
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Effective rehabilitation of older people in a district rehabilitation centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136318
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2011 Apr;43(5):461-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Inger Johansen
Morten Lindbaek
Johan K Stanghelle
Mette Brekke
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice/General Practice Research Unit, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway. inger.johansen@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2011 Apr;43(5):461-4
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis - rehabilitation
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - manpower
Hip Fractures - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation Centers - manpower
Stroke - rehabilitation
Abstract
To assess the outcome of rehabilitation of older patients in a district rehabilitation centre.
Prospective observational study.
A total of 202 patients aged = 65 years rehabilitated at a Norwegian district inpatient rehabilitation centre, referred from district hospital, nursing homes or their own homes. Diagnoses were: stroke, arthrosis, hip fracture and other chronic diseases.
Admission: according to rehabilitation potential.
multidisciplinary team including an experienced general practitioner.
Sunnaas Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Index (SI).
Umea Life Satisfaction Checklist (LSC). Cognitive (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)), emotional (Symptom Check List-10) and marital status, residence, length of stay and hours/week private and home care services were recorded.
SI increased significantly during the mean 3.1 weeks stay (mean 4.2, 95% confidence interval 3.5, 4.8), p
PubMed ID
21390482 View in PubMed
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Effect of treatment interruption and intensification of antiretroviral therapy on health-related quality of life in patients with advanced HIV: a randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136391
Source
Med Decis Making. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):70-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Vilija R Joyce
Paul G Barnett
Adam Chow
Ahmed M Bayoumi
Susan C Griffin
Huiying Sun
Mark Holodniy
Sheldon T Brown
Tassos C Kyriakides
D William Cameron
Mike Youle
Mark Sculpher
Aslam H Anis
Douglas K Owens
Author Affiliation
VA Palo Alto Health Care System, VA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA HSR&D Health Economics Resource Center, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. vilija.joyce@va.gov
Source
Med Decis Making. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):70-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Great Britain
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
United States
Abstract
The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption or intensification on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in advanced HIV patients is unknown.
To assess the impact of temporary treatment interruption and intensification of ART on HRQoL.
A 2 x 2 factorial open label randomized controlled trial.
Hospitals in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.
Multidrug resistant (MDR) HIV patients.
Patients were randomized to receive a 12-wk interruption or not, and ART intensification or standard ART.
The Health Utilities Index (HUI3), EQ-5D, standard gamble (SG), time tradeoff (TTO), visual analog scale (VAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV).
There were no significant differences in HRQoL among the four groups during follow-up; however, there was a temporary significant decline in HRQoL on some measures within the interruption group during interruption (HUI3 -0.05, P = 0.03; VAS -5.9, P = 0.002; physical health summary -2.9, P = 0.001; mental health summary -1.9, P = 0.02). Scores declined slightly overall during follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed significantly lower HRQoL associated with some clinical events. Limitations. The results may not apply to HIV patients who have not experienced multiple treatment failures or who have not developed MDR HIV.
Temporary ART interruption and ART intensification provided neither superior nor inferior HRQoL compared with no interruption and standard ART. Among surviving patients, HRQoL scores declined only slightly over years of follow-up in this advanced HIV cohort; however, approximately one-third of patients died during the trial follow up. Lower HRQoL was associated with adverse clinical events.
PubMed ID
21383086 View in PubMed
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It's no surprise! Men are not hit more than women by the health consequences of unemployment in the Northern Swedish Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136396
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):187-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Anne Hammarström
Per E Gustafsson
Mattias Strandh
Pekka Virtanen
Urban Janlert
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. anne.hammarstrom@fammed.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):187-93
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Public Health
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment
Young Adult
Abstract
Research often fails to ascertain whether men and women are equally hit by the health consequences of unemployment. The aim of this study was to analyze whether men's self-reported health and health behaviour were hit more by unemployment than women's in a follow-up of the Northern Swedish Cohort.
A follow-up study of a cohort of all school leavers in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden was performed from age 16 to age 42. Of those still alive of the original cohort, 94% (n = 1,006) participated during the whole period. A sample was made of participants in the labour force and living in Sweden (n = 916). Register data were used to assess the length of unemployment from age 40 to 42, while questionnaire data were used for the other variables.
In multivariate logistic regression analyses significant relations between unemployment and mental health/smoking were found among both women and men, even after control for unemployment at the time of the investigation and indicators of health-related selection. Significant relations between unemployment and alcohol consumption were found among women, while few visits to a dentist was significant among men.
Men are not hit more by the health consequences of unemployment in a Swedish context, with a high participation rate of women in the labour market. The public health relevance is that the study indicates the need to take gendered contexts into account in public health research.
PubMed ID
21382857 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: the 1987 Finnish Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136443
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):941-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Reija Paananen
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
THL National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):941-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses
Child
Child Development
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Registries
PubMed ID
21378104 View in PubMed
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The interplay of infections, function and length of stay (LOS) in newly admitted geriatric psychiatry patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136449
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Jan-Feb;54(1):251-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rhonda E Malyuk
Carol Wong
Barbara Buree
Arvind Kang
Nirmal Kang
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Psychiatry Program, Valleyview Building, Riverview Hospital, B.C. Mental Health and Addiction Services, 2601 Lougheed Highway, Coquitlam, B.C., Canada V3C 4J2. rmalyuk@bcmhs.bc.ca
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Jan-Feb;54(1):251-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Comorbidity
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infection - epidemiology
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of identifying and treating infections on functional outcomes and length of stay (LOS). Our retrospective naturalistic study reviewed all new admissions to a tertiary geriatric psychiatry teaching hospital from 2003 to 2007. Over this four-year period, 390 patients were admitted and discharged with 21% (85) of patients identified as having infections on admission. Those with infections were compared to the group without to determine and compare clinical characteristics. Factors included in analysis were: age, gender, diagnoses, medical comorbidity, neuropsychiatric symptoms, functional outcomes, medications and LOS. Both groups were similar in gender, psychiatric diagnoses and severity of dementia. Those requiring antibiotics for treatment of infections on admission, were older (p=0.003), had poorer baseline function (p=0.005) and higher medical comorbidity (p
PubMed ID
21377222 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood deprivation and psychiatric medication prescription: a Swedish national multilevel study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136463
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2011 Apr;21(4):231-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Casey Crump
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Marilyn A Winkleby
Author Affiliation
Stanford Family Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304-5765, USA. kccrump@stanford.edu
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2011 Apr;21(4):231-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multilevel Analysis
Odds Ratio
Psychotropic Drugs
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies of neighborhood deprivation and mental disorders have yielded mixed results, possibly because they were based on different substrata of the population. We conducted a national multilevel study to determine whether neighborhood deprivation is independently associated with psychiatric medication prescription in a national population.
Nationwide outpatient and inpatient psychiatric medication data were analyzed for all Swedish adults (N = 6,998,075) after 2.5 years of follow-up. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate the association between neighborhood deprivation (index of education, income, unemployment, and welfare assistance) and prescription of psychiatric medications (antipsychotics, antidepressants, anxiolytics, or hypnotics/sedatives), after adjusting for broadly measured individual-level sociodemographic characteristics.
For each psychiatric medication class, a monotonic trend of increasing prescription was observed by increasing level of neighborhood deprivation. The strongest associations were found for antipsychotics and anxiolytics, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-1.44) and 1.24 (95% CI, 1.22-1.27), respectively, comparing the highest- to the lowest-deprivation neighborhood quintiles.
These findings suggest that neighborhood deprivation is associated with psychiatric medication prescription independent of individual-level sociodemographic characteristics. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which neighborhood deprivation may affect mental health and to identify the most susceptible groups in the population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21376269 View in PubMed
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Views on health information and perceptions of standardized electronic records among staff in Child and School Health Services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136479
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 Mar;19(2):201-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Ylva Ståhl
Mats Granlund
Boel Gäre-Andersson
Karin Enskär
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Research School Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. ylva.stahl@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 Mar;19(2):201-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Communication
Documentation
Female
Health Care Surveys
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Perception
Physicians - psychology
Program Development
Questionnaires
School Health Services - organization & administration
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate how nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services view the documentation and transfer of health information. Another aim concerns their perceptions of a nationally standardized electronic health record.
Problems of mental health among children and adolescents currently pose one of the greatest challenges facing all European countries. The continuity of health work demands that all health information follow the child's development, disregarding the organizational arrangement.
The study was descriptive and comprised 484 questionnaires to nurses and physicians in the Child and School Health Services in Sweden.
More information about children's health was transferred than documented in the health record when children started school. This additional health information concerned psychosocial health and foremost family function. There was a consensus concerning the usefulness of a nationally standardized electronic health record, although there were group differences between nurses and physicians.
All information about children's health is not documented although the professional's positive perceptions to electronic health records may provide a basis to improve documentation.
The results indicate challenges to develop a common language to document psychosocial issues necessary for providing a holistic view of children's health.
PubMed ID
21375623 View in PubMed
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