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Mental health for all in the year 2000--also in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76783
Source
Pages 571-575 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 571 -575, 1988 MENTAL HEALTH FOR ALL IN THE YEAR 2000 -ALSO IN THE ARCTIC Inge Lynge Snekkersten, Denmark Abstract. The themes of this section, mental health, alcoholism, drug and child abuse are the most important and the most difficult
  1 document  
Author
Lynge, I.
Author Affiliation
Snekkersten, Denmark
Source
Pages 571-575 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Alcohol consumption
Creativity
Greenland
Introspection
Inuit society
Documents
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Circumpolar Inuit Health Priorities: Best Health Practices and Research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297075
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada. Ottawa, ON. 159 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 2012
.................................................................................................................................................... 11 Mental Health ..................................................................................................................................... 11 Service Delivery
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada. Ottawa, ON. 159 p.
Date
March 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2498673
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Mental health
Food security
Chronic Disease
Abstract
This report, Circumpolar Inuit Health Priorities: Best Health Practices and Research, documents and assesses a comprehensive range of best practice programs and relevant studies which have been implemented across the Arctic in the main health areas of mental health, service delivery, food security and chronic disease. Together, the material provides an important collection of information on the health practices and challenges which are impacting on the health and wellbeing of Inuit living in their Arctic homeland across four countries - Canada, Greenland, Alaska and Chukotka (Russia).
This report is the second part of ICC Canada’s overall effort to identify and document the range of health and wellness experiences, studies and practices that impact on Inuit directly and indirectly. The first part of this work was a review of the different health systems which Inuit access in the four different countries. That report, Health Systems serving Inuit communities across the Arctic, was completed in 2011. This second report completes the task of documenting the experiences.
Documents

finalcircumpolar_inuit_best_health_practices_2012.pdf

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Health aspects of colonization and the post-Colonial Period in Greenland 1721 to 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296259
Source
Journal of Northern Studies. Vol. 10, no. 2. p.85-106.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
significantly while suicides became an important cause of death. We have outlined two parallel sequences of events, namely the gen- eral history of Greenland with emphasis on certain effects of coloniza- tion on everyday life and the epidemiological transition with emphasis on mental health. In particular
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard, Peter
Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken
Source
Journal of Northern Studies. Vol. 10, no. 2. p.85-106.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1437708
Keywords
Inuit
Colonization
Mental health
Alcohol
Suicides
Abstract
Colonization in Greenland lasted from 1721 to 1953 but even after the introduction of self-government in 2009, aspects of eco-nomic and cultural colonization persist. Several epidemics that deci-mated the population have been recorded from the colonial period. In the post-colonial period urbanization, immigration of Danish workers and alcohol consumption increased significantly while suicides became an important cause of death.
We have outlined two parallel sequences of events, namely the gen-eral history of Greenland with emphasis on certain effects of coloniza-tion on everyday life and the epidemiological transition with emphasis on mental health. In particular, results from a health survey in 2014 among the Inuit in Greenland showed statistically significant associ-ations between suicidal thoughts in adulthood and sexual abuse as a child as well as between sexual abuse as a child and alcohol problems in the childhood home. Among women also current socioeconomic con-ditions were associated with sexual abuse as a child.
Colonization in Greenland was relatively benign and our results illus-trate that it is not only extensive colonial stress such as genocide and loss of language and culture that has negative effects on mental health but also the more subtle stress factors that the Inuit in Greenland were exposed to.
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Dronnng Ingrids sanatorium i Godthåb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293133
Source
Grønland, 1957 (2):41-56.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1957
Author
Stein, K.S.
Bernhardt, S. Aa.
Source
Grønland, 1957 (2):41-56.
Date
1957
Language
Danish
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Mental health
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 425.
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Common mental disorders among patients in primary health care in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72402
Source
Pages 423-426 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Common Mental Disorders among Patients in Primary Health Care in Greenland Inge Lynge1•3, Aksel Bertelsen2, Peter Bjerregaard1, Per Fink.3, Poul Munk- J(l)rgensen3, and Amalie Lynge Pedersen1 1 Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
  1 document  
Author
Lynge, I.
Bertelsen, A.
Bjerregaard, P.
Fink, P.
Munk-Jørgensen, P.
Pedersen, A.L.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Pages 423-426 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Statistics
Abstract
Studies from all over the world have shown that well defined mental disorders are common in all general health care settings and that marked disability is associated with common mental disorders, more so than with chronic physical disorders without psychological disturbances. A majority of mental disorders are unrecognized and do not get appropriate treatment. No such study has been made in Greenland, but there are many indications that mental health is threatened and needs more attention. A two-stage study of common mental disorders among patients in the primary health service in Greenland is planned to take place from September 1996 to 1998. The research plan is presented as an invitation to replicate the study in other circumpolar areas.
PubMed ID
10093318 View in PubMed
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Common mental disorders among patients in primary health care in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9278
Source
Pages 377-383 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Common mental disorders among patients in primary health care in Greenland Inge Lynge'", Pov/ Munk-Jorgensen '',Amalia Lynge Pedersen;. Gert Mulvad ',Peter Bjerregaard' 1 National lnstitute of Public Heal111, Copenhagen 2 Institute of Basic Psychiatric Research, Departn1cnt of Psychiatric
  1 document  
Author
Lynge, I
Munk-J�?�¸rgensen, P
Lynge Pedersen, A
Mulvad, G
Bjerregaard, P
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen. ingelynge@dadlnet.gk
Source
Pages 377-383 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Referral and Consultation
Risk factors
Two-phase study
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: There are many indications that mental health in Greenland is endangered and needs more attention. STUDY DESIGN: A two-stage study of the prevalence of common mental disorders among a sample of primary health care patients. METHODS: 376 randomly selected patients from general consultations in two Greenlandic towns were screened with 12 questions from the General Health Questionnaire. From these patients, a sample of 100 patients, including more high- than low-scorers, was interviewed using the SCAN (Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry) Present Examination psychiatric interview. RESULTS: Estimated prevalence for the total study population of at least one psychiatric diagnosis was 49.3% (95% CI 39.7-59.0%). Most diagnoses were in the group of anxieties, somatoform disorders and depressive disorders. Many patients had more than one diagnosis. Lack of education and poor proficiency in Danish, as well as growing up in a family with severe alcohol problems, were high risk factors for a psychiatric diagnosis. Patients and physicians seemingly agreed on focusing on physical disorders at the consultation, and only a minority of mental disorders was recognised and treated as such by the physicians. CONCLUSION: Mental disorders are prevalent but not sufficiently recognised and treated among patients in primary health care in Greenland. Their association with social and economic conditions calls for attention from the health services as well as from social and educational institutions.
PubMed ID
15736689 View in PubMed
Documents
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Source
Pages 280-287 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Mental diseases and addiction 60I2001 SUICIDE IN A SOCIETY IN TRANSITION Markus Leineweber1, Peter Bjerre9aard1, Cor Baerveldt! and Paul Voestermans2 I 1 National Institute of Public Health, Section for research in Greenland, Copenhagen 0, Denmark 1Department of Cultural Psychology
  1 document  
Author
Leineweber, M
Bjerregaard, P
Baerveldt, C
Voestermans, P
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen Ã?, Denmark. markusleineweber@hotmail.com
Source
Pages 280-287 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Culture change
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Inuit
Male
Mental health
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Change
Suicide - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In Greenland, the rapid socio-cultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an increasing number of suicides. The suicide rates in Greenland are now among the highest in the world. Especially among men aged 15-24 suicide rates are dramatically high. In the present study, information on the psycho-social background of suicides is provided based on a review of death certificates and police reports for the period 1993-95. Dysfunctional social networks seem to play a predominant role among suicides. Being disconnected from community and family ties seems to increase the vulnerability of young people in Greenland. In addition, temporal trends of suicide rates are described for the different regions of Greenland. The findings are discussed in relation to the societal and cultural transition of the society.
PubMed ID
11507983 View in PubMed
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An interdisciplinary approach to mental disorder among the Polar Eskimos of northwest Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293765
Source
Anthropologica, 2 n.s.:249-260.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1960
Author
Wallace, A.F.C.
Ackerman, R.E.
Source
Anthropologica, 2 n.s.:249-260.
Date
1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Neuropsychiatric disorders
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1052.
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Changing living conditions, life style and health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9025
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):442-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Curtis, T
Kvernmo, S
Bjerregaard, P
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. tc@si-folkesundhed.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):442-50
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental change
Greenland
Life Style
Living conditions
Abstract
Human health is the result of the interaction of genetic, nutritional, socio-cultural, economic, physical infrastructure and ecosystem factors. All of the individual, social, cultural and socioeconomic factors are influenced by the environment they are embedded in and by changes in this environment. The aim of the paper is to illustrate the influence of environmental change on living conditions and life style and some of the mechanisms through which such changes affect physical and mental health. The interrelationship between environmental and societal change is illustrated by an example from a small community in Greenland, where changing environmental conditions have influenced fishing and employment opportunities to the extent that the size of the population has changed dramatically. The link between social change and health is shown with reference to studies on education, housing and occupation as well as life style changes. The paper further illustrates the relationship between the rapid socio-cultural and economic change and the health of the population. Psychosocial stress is reflected in problems such as alcohol abuse, violence and suicide, and these factors have been shown in studies on migration and transitions in health to be connected to changes in lifestyle and living conditions.
PubMed ID
16440606 View in PubMed
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Setting the context: circumpolar health and its challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296579
Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities. [11 slides]
Date
[2007]
each of the four country ICC offices  ICC health paper developed to support the steering committee's work Major Shared Health Concerns Mental health  Suicide  Substance abuse  Diseases: Cancer Diabetes Heart disease Tuberculosis Gaps between Inuit and national populations
  1 document  
Author
Kruemmel, Eva
Author Affiliation
ICC Canada Office
Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities. [11 slides]
Date
[2007]
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
File Size
911091
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Inuit
Health
Documents

Eva_Kruemmel__Circumpolar_Health_and_Its_Challenges.pdf

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Health research in Greenland: Start with the children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29887
Source
Pages 153-155 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
strategy for disease prevention and health promotion adapted to the local circumstances. Living conditions. e.g. health standard-.; and housing. schools and education as 1vcll as social relations should be studied further. Lifestyle diseases, the incidence of dental dis- eases, mental health
  1 document  
Author
Mulvad, G
Pedersen, HS
Olsen, J
Author Affiliation
Commission for Scientific Research in Greenland. gm@gh.gl
Source
Pages 153-155 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biomedical research
Child
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Public Health
Abstract
We believe that public health should take a life-course approach, starting at conception, or at best before, at the time of pregnancy planning, and focus upon living conditions for children. Most of the determinants of life expectancy are established early in life.
PubMed ID
15736642 View in PubMed
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Health interview survey in Greenland 1993

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102110
Source
Pages 33-34 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
(13) 1.1.4. Mental wellbeing 2.2.1. Interpreter service 3.5.1. Daily life 1.2. Disease last two weeks (7) 2.2.2. Delivery 3.5.2. Adoption 1.2.1. Ill-health last two weeks 2 2 3 Suggested 1"mprov t · · · emen s 4. Living Conditions (15) 1.2.2. Presence of specified symptoms last two weeks 3
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard, P
Senderovitz, F
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiolgy, Copenhagen, Denmark
Greenland Home Rule, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 33-34 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Behavior
Greenland
Disease
Health
Health services
Lifestyle
Living conditions
Abstract
In 1992, the Greenlandic Home Rule took responsibility for health care services. Planning on the basis of epidemiological evidence was given high priority, and one of the first things to be initiated was a general health interview survey. In June 1992, external funding was secured and the planning began. A questionnaire has been developed in Danish and Greenlandic, and 30 students at the University in Nuuk have been trained as interviewers. The interviews will take place during the summer of 1993, and analysis will start in early 1994. We expect a report on the basic findings to be ready in September 1994. The interviews cover a broad range of topics, including self-perceived health, lifestyle, living conditions, and use of health services.
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Health care in the circumpolar world: Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68845
Source
Pages 49-53 in J. Leppäluoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
- seases and cholesterol disorders, as the prevalence or detection of these diseases is increasing dra- n1atically. Besides this, there are many indications that mental health is threatened and needs more attention. The use of health services YVhat do we kno\v about this? Not as n1uch as vve
  1 document  
Author
Aaen-Larsen, B
Author Affiliation
Rural Health Management, Nuuk, Greenland. aaen@gh.gl
Source
Pages 49-53 in J. Leppäluoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Care Costs
Health Status Indicators
Humans
National Health Programs
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Telemedicine
Abstract
Greenland is part of the Kingdom of Denmark and it is the world's largest island. An ice cap covers 85% of its territory. The population is about 57,000 inhabitants, with 14,000 living in the capital Nuuk, and 10,000 in villages and other small settlements. There are pronounced regional variations in lifestyle and living conditions. The Greenland Home Rule Government assumed responsibility, for health care on 1 January 1992. Greenland's territory is divided into 16 health care districts. Queen Ingrid's Hospital in Nuuk is the national hospital and has 156 beds and numerous specialist physicians associated with it. Each health district has a health care centre with one or more physicians, nurses and other health care personnel appropriate for the number of people living in the district. Each district health centre is responsible for primary health care in towns, villages and other small settlements, and the health centres treat all common illnesses. The health centres handle uncomplicated births, minor surgery, common treatment in internal medicine and community mental health services. The centres have a number of inpatient beds proportional to the number of people in the health district. People with more complicated illnesses are referred to Queen Ingrid's Hospital in Nuuk or to specialised treatment in Denmark.
PubMed ID
15736622 View in PubMed
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Gambling: A new player in Greenlandic public health research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256644
Source
Pages 433-434 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
GAMBLING, A NEW PLAYER IN GREENLANDIC PUBLIC HEAL TH RESEARCH C.V.L. Larsen, P. Bjerregaard Greenland Institute of Health Research and Centre for Health Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southem Denmark Background: A growing public and professional
  1 document  
Author
Larsen CVL
Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Greenland Institute of Health Research and Centre for Health Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Source
Pages 433-434 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Gambling
Greenland
Public Health
Addiction
Inuit
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
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Health systems serving Inuit communities across the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295954
Source
Health Canada (Northern Region). 15 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2011
pharmaceuticals, nursing care, home nursing services in some districts, home mental health care, preventive services, rehabilitation and child and school health services.12 The municipalities are responsible for home nursing services in some health districts, preventive services and nursing homes. They are
  1 document  
Author
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada
Source
Health Canada (Northern Region). 15 pp.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Denmark
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
505903
Keywords
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
The Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), which was formed in 1977, represents the interests of the Inuit of Canada, Alaska (USA), Greenland and Chukotka (Russia) supporting them in addressing challenges of circumpolar and international importance which are impacting on their lives. One of the top priorities for ICC is the health and wellbeing of circumpolar Inuit. Within the ICC network across the four Arctic countries, ICC Canada has been given responsibility for taking the lead on health. As a permanent participant of the Arctic Council, ICC is an active member of the AHHEG and is represented by ICC Canada. As part of its work program, AHHEG has agreed to undertake a review and analysis of the health care systems in circumpolar countries. The objective of this work is to compile a comparison of circumpolar health systems to highlight the different responses to similar challenges (e.g. low population density, reduced access, cultural and linguistic differences from the majority population in the country, impact of cold climate on morbidity and service delivery), and focus on the effects of differing governance and organization (e.g. autonomy of sub-states, role of sub-states in terms of health funding, administration and delivery, primary care models, and special arrangements for indigenous populations). The final paper will be published by the International Journal of Circumpolar Health.
Documents

finalcircumpolarinuithealthsystems.pdf

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Problems with alcohol and drugs in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102233
Source
Pages 542-544 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
incidence of mental disease. However, the use of tranquilizers, amphetamines or morphine has so far been very limited. Alcohol abuse constitutes a dominant problem. The leading political attitude to the use of alcohol has been very liberal. However, during the last years the Government has boosted the
  1 document  
Author
Joergensen, B
Author Affiliation
Thule District Hospital, Greenland
Source
Pages 542-544 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alcohol
Consumption
Drinking
Drugs
Greenland
Hashish
Mental disorders
Public Opinion
Abstract
Despite prohibition in Greenland against hashish, the consumption of this is common in major towns, resulting in a higher incidence of mental disease. However, the use of tranquilizers, amphetamines, or morphine has so far been very limited. Alcohol abuse constitutes a dominant problem. The leading political attitude to the use of alcohol has been very liberal. However, during the last years the Government has boosted the alcohol consumer tax. Both in the scientific reports and in the declarations from the Government, moralizing has been completely avoided and practically tabooed. The aim of the present study is to describe the public opinion about alcohol problems. Special reference is given to how alcohol problems are fought against by the Thule inhabitants. The general opinion is that a sense of responsibility is crucial when facing alcohol-related problems. Morals are not suitable for scientific analyses, but the concept of morals should be central in the debate on alcohol problems. By ignoring the significance of morals one excludes both the responsibility of the individual and the ability to adapt to social problems. There is a difference between the current scientific view and the people's way of thinking. The treatment of alcohol problems should be based on awareness of the connection between cause and responsibility.
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The importance of family to health, development and welfare of children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9279
Source
Pages 248-251 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
risk of serious suicidal thoughts compared to those V.'ithout alcohol problen1s in their child- hood home (1) A study of mental health among prl1nary health care patients in Ci-reenland found an even higher risk of mental disorder as a gro\vn-up for those gro\ving up \Vith alcohol proble1ns
  1 document  
Author
Christensen, E
Lynge, I
Author Affiliation
The Danish National Institute of Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark. ec@sfi.dk
Source
Pages 248-251 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Children at risk
Children of alcoholics
Family
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Recent investigations have shown that a number of families in Greenland have problems related to parents' use of alcohol. One of the consequences is that children get more difficult conditions during childhood. Children suffer when their parents have alcohol-related problems. An alcoholic parent is generally not able to meet the needs of his or her child. Many children are very lonely and do not discuss their thoughts, their situation or their problems with anyone. Some children get serious psychosocial problems as grown-ups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Professionals who work with children in health services, social services or within the school system are generally not adequately aware of the importance of family to the children's reactions. This means that the children are at risk of being treated only for symptoms when the unity of child and family is not adequately taken into account. Prevention has to focus on the first steps. Children must be allowed to talk about their problems. The whole family should be included in the treatment.
PubMed ID
15736661 View in PubMed
Documents
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A preliminary report of Kayak-angst among the Eskimo of West Greenland: a study in sensory deprivation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293751
Source
Int. J. soc. Psychiat., 9:18-26.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Gussow, Z.
Source
Int. J. soc. Psychiat., 9:18-26.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety
Anxiety Disorders
Humans
Inuits
Mental disrocers
Phobic Disorders
Sensory Deprivation
Stress, Physiological
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1029.
PubMed ID
13951399 View in PubMed
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2009 Circumpolar Inuit Health Summit: Yellowknife, Canada, July 9-10, 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296469
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2009
. Inuit women are dying 12 years earlier. Inuit have more babies dying before the age of one than people have in the rest of the country. Mental health problems, high suicide rates among our young people, substance abuse and violence are all too common in our communities. Nutrition and the quality
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Canada. 17 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
1875662
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Inuit
Health and wellness
Documents

2009_healthsummitreport_final.pdf

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Social and cultural factors as determinants of self-rated health in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2918
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
the researchers, and at public meetings in Greenland. The next step is a thorough analysis of the material, which will be published in a series of reports in Danish, covering the following top- ics: living conditions, lifestyle, and health; health services; diseases and mental well-being
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard, P.
Curtis, T.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Health status surveys
Indigenous peoples
Sociocultural classification
Survey methodology
Abstract
In 1993-94, a countrywide health interview survey was performed in 38 towns and villages throughout Greenland. Information was collected on self-rated health and self-reported disease, social and cultural factors, lifestyle, and living conditions. A total of 1,580 adult Greenlanders and 148 Danes was interviewed (57% of the sample). Respondents were classified according to ethnic self-identification and job category, but these customary classifications were not satisfactory. An alternative classification according to exposure to traditional Greenlandic hunting culture and Danish culture during childhood was tested. The population fell into three subgroups, each with its own socioeconomic, ethnic, and occupational pattern, and with different health and health behavior. The new classification has distinct advantages as a supplement to the usual classification according to ethnicity and job category. The aim of the present paper is to present a comprehensive health interview survey from Greenland andto discuss some considerations regarding sociocultural classification of the population.
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