Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Common adult psychiatric disorders in Swedish primary care where most mental health patients are treated.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289919
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 06 30; 17(1):235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-30-2017
Author
Jan Sundquist
Henrik Ohlsson
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. jan.sundquist@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 06 30; 17(1):235
Date
06-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Feeding and Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - psychology
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The overall aim of this study is to present descriptive data regarding the treated prevalence of nine common psychiatric and substance use disorders in the first Primary Care Registry (PCR) in Sweden: Major Depression (MD), Anxiety Disorders (AD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Adjustment Disorder (AdjD), Eating Disorders (ED), Personality Disorder (PD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) and Drug Abuse (DA).
We selected 5,397,675 individuals aged =18. We examined patterns of comorbidity among these disorders and explored the association between diagnoses in the PCR and diagnoses obtained from Hospital and Specialist care. We explored the proportion of patients with these nine disorders that are only treated in primary health care.
For four of our disorders, 80% or more of the cases were present only in the PCR: AdjD, DA, AD and MD. For two disorders (OCD and ED), 65-70% of cases were only found in the PCR. For three disorders (PD, AUD, and ADHD), 45-55% of the patients were only present in the PCR.
The PCR will, in the future, likely prove to be an important tool for studies in psychiatric epidemiology.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2163-96 PMID 23245607
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1979;40(1):89-116 PMID 376949
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;62(6):593-602 PMID 15939837
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999 Oct;56(10):921-6 PMID 10530634
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Apr;45(5):977-83 PMID 25119068
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;171(2):209-17 PMID 24077613
Cites: Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;12(1):PCC.08m00764 PMID 20582294
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Jul 24-31;276(4):293-9 PMID 8656541
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998 Nov;55(11):973-9 PMID 9819065
Cites: Fam Pract. 2010 Feb;27(1):9-16 PMID 19884124
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;202(4):294-300 PMID 23470286
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):250-5 PMID 18609025
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Oct;158(10):1568-78 PMID 11578982
Cites: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2014 Apr;264(3):235-45 PMID 23828500
Cites: Int J Eat Disord. 2000 Jan;27(1):1-20 PMID 10590444
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;51(1):8-19 PMID 8279933
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1970 Jan;126(7):983-7 PMID 5409569
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 May;65(5):501-7 PMID 18458201
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;55(1):41-46.e1 PMID 26703908
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2013 Mar;170(3):324-33 PMID 23318474
Cites: Lakartidningen. 1997 Dec 3;94(49):4612-4, 4617-8 PMID 9445933
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Oct;157(10):1552-62 PMID 11007705
Cites: Fam Pract. 2012 Dec;29(6):678-87 PMID 22523390
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2009 Nov;14(11):1051-66 PMID 18427559
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;39(11):899-905 PMID 15549242
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;168(1):29-39 PMID 20952461
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;158(7):1091-8 PMID 11431231
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;71(4):439-45 PMID 24576925
PubMed ID
28666429 View in PubMed
Less detail

Toxoplasma gondii infection and common mental disorders in the Finnish general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290229
Source
J Affect Disord. 2017 12 01; 223:20-25
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Jaana Suvisaari
Minna Torniainen-Holm
Maija Lindgren
Tommi Härkänen
Robert H Yolken
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Department of Public Health Solutions, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: jaana.suvisaari@thl.fi.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2017 12 01; 223:20-25
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Toxoplasmosis - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated whether T. gondii seropositivity is associated with 12-month depressive, anxiety and alcohol use disorders and current depressive symptoms and whether inflammation, measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) level, explains these associations.
Health 2000 study (BRIF8901), conducted in years 2000-2001, is based on a nationally representative sample of Finns aged 30 and above, with 7112 participants and 88.6% response rate. DSM-IV depressive, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and depressive symptoms with the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI-21). We used logistic regression to investigate the association of T. gondii seropositivity with mental disorders and linear regression with BDI-21 scores.
T. gondii seroprevalence was significantly associated with 12-month generalized anxiety disorder but not with other anxiety, depressive or alcohol use disorders. T. gondii seropositivity was associated with higher BDI-21 scores (beta 0.56, 95% CI 0.12-1.00, P = 0.013) and with having a comorbid depressive and anxiety disorder (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.16-2.97, P = 0.010). Higher CRP levels were associated with these outcomes and with T. gondii seropositivity, but adjusting for CRP did not change the effect of T. gondii seropositivity.
Cross-sectional study design with no information on the timing of T. gondii infection.
T. gondii seropositivity is associated with generalized anxiety disorder, depressive symptoms and comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders, which is not mediated by inflammation.
Notes
Cites: Vet Parasitol. 2010 Aug 4;171(3-4):331-6 PMID 20434266
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Nov;44(11):805-14 PMID 22831461
Cites: Parasit Vectors. 2016 Jan 05;9:8 PMID 26728406
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2015 Sep;132(3):161-79 PMID 25877655
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Nov;33(11):568-78 PMID 9803825
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2013 Sep 25;150(3):736-44 PMID 23870425
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Jan;40(1):1-10 PMID 15624068
Cites: Folia Parasitol (Praha). 2014 Aug;61(4):285-92 PMID 25185399
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2007 May;33(3):782-8 PMID 17387159
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 12;363(9425):1965-76 PMID 15194258
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Jan;60:87-94 PMID 25306262
Cites: Psychol Med. 2012 Dec;42(12):2641-50 PMID 22716910
Cites: Int J Parasitol. 2009 Oct;39(12):1385-94 PMID 19433092
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Jan 1;60(1):101-7 PMID 25225234
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Mar;77(3):334-41 PMID 27046307
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2016 Mar;42(2):386-95 PMID 26392628
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;69(11):1123-30 PMID 22752117
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2007 May;33(3):737-40 PMID 17314085
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Aug;73(8):1069-76 PMID 22938818
Cites: J Clin Med Res. 2016 Jul;8(7):519-23 PMID 27298660
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1961 Jun;4:561-71 PMID 13688369
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2002 Feb 15;185 Suppl 1:S73-82 PMID 11865443
Cites: Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2006;140(2):89-95 PMID 16554659
Cites: Brain Behav Immun. 2015 Jan;43:192-7 PMID 25124709
Cites: J Vet Diagn Invest. 2012 Nov;24(6):1115-24 PMID 23012380
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2011 Feb;47(3):404-12 PMID 20727736
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Mar 1;171(5):618-23 PMID 20133516
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 May;204(5):433.e1-7 PMID 21345406
Cites: Mil Med. 2015 Jun;180(6):621-5 PMID 26032378
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(8):625-31 PMID 16857606
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jul 15;321(7254):142-7 PMID 10894691
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Feb 17;11(2):e0148435 PMID 26886853
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2014 Dec;169:15-20 PMID 25128861
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2010 May 15;177(1-2):263-5 PMID 20106536
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Nov;201(11):948-52 PMID 24177481
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Aug 15;72(4):290-5 PMID 22325983
Cites: Parasitology. 2016 Dec;143(14 ):1974-1989 PMID 27719690
PubMed ID
28715724 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetically Informative Mediation Modeling Applied to Stressors and Personality-Disorder Traits in Etiology of Alcohol Use Disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299458
Source
Behav Genet. 2019 01; 49(1):11-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
01-2019
Author
Tom Rosenström
Nikolai Olavi Czajkowski
Eivind Ystrom
Robert F Krueger
Steven H Aggen
Nathan A Gillespie
Espen Eilertsen
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Fartein Ask Torvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. tom.rosenstrom@helsinki.fi.
Source
Behav Genet. 2019 01; 49(1):11-23
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Childhood Experiences
Alcoholism - etiology - genetics
Biometry
Child
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Diseases in Twins
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Models, Statistical
Norway
Personality
Personality Disorders - complications - genetics
Phenotype
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
A statistical mediation model was developed within a twin design to investigate the etiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Unlike conventional statistical mediation models, this biometric mediation model can detect unobserved confounding. Using a sample of 1410 pairs of Norwegian twins, we investigated specific hypotheses that DSM-IV personality-disorder (PD) traits mediate effects of childhood stressful life events (SLEs) on AUD, and that adulthood SLEs mediate effects of PDs on AUD. Models including borderline PD traits indicated unobserved confounding in phenotypic path coefficients, whereas models including antisocial and impulsive traits did not. More than half of the observed effects of childhood SLEs on adulthood AUD were mediated by adulthood antisocial and impulsive traits. Effects of PD traits on AUD 5?10 years later were direct rather than mediated by adulthood SLEs. The results and the general approach contribute to triangulation of developmental origins for complex behavioral disorders.
PubMed ID
30536213 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with cognitive functioning and risk of dementia in the general population: 11-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299655
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2018 03; 69:480-485
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Minna Torniainen-Holm
Jaana Suvisaari
Maija Lindgren
Tommi Härkänen
Faith Dickerson
Robert H Yolken
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: minna.torniainen-holm@thl.fi.
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2018 03; 69:480-485
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Dementia - epidemiology - virology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Herpesvirus 4, Human - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Earlier studies have documented an association between cytomegalovirus and cognitive impairment, but results have been inconsistent. Few studies have investigated the association of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with cognitive decline longitudinally. Our aim was to examine whether cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus are associated with cognitive decline in adults.
The study sample is from the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (BRIF8901, n?=?7112), which is representative of the Finnish adult population. The sample was followed up after 11?years in the Health 2011 Survey. In addition, persons with dementia were identified from healthcare registers.
In the Finnish population aged 30 and over, the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus was estimated to be 84% and the seroprevalence of Epstein-Barr virus 98%. Seropositivity of the viruses and antibody levels were mostly not associated with cognitive performance. In the middle-aged adult group, cytomegalovirus serointensity was associated with impaired performance in verbal learning. However, the association disappeared when corrected for multiple testing. No interactions between infection and time or between the two infections were significant when corrected for multiple testing. Seropositivity did not predict dementia diagnosis.
The results suggest that adult levels of antibodies to cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus may not be associated with a significant decline in cognitive function or with dementia at population level.
PubMed ID
29355820 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of suicide and non-fatal self-harm after bariatric surgery: results from two matched cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295016
Source
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2018 03; 6(3):197-207
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Martin Neovius
Gustaf Bruze
Peter Jacobson
Kajsa Sjöholm
Kari Johansson
Fredrik Granath
Johan Sundström
Ingmar Näslund
Claude Marcus
Johan Ottosson
Markku Peltonen
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: martin.neovius@ki.se.
Source
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2018 03; 6(3):197-207
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - surgery
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Bariatric surgery reduces mortality, but might have adverse effects on mental health. We assessed the risk of suicide and self-harm after bariatric surgery compared with non-surgical obesity treatment.
Suicide and non-fatal self-harm events retrieved from nationwide Swedish registers were examined in two cohorts. The non-randomised, prospective Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study compared bariatric surgery (n=2010; 1369 vertical-banded gastroplasty, 376 gastric banding, and 265 gastric bypass) with usual care (n=2037; recruitment 1987-2001). The second cohort consisted of individuals from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg; n=20?256 patients who had gastric bypass) matched to individuals treated with intensive lifestyle modification (n=16?162; intervention 2006-13) on baseline BMI, age, sex, education level, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, history of self-harm, substance misuse, antidepressant use, anxiolytics use, and psychiatric health-care contacts.
During 68?528 person-years (median 18; IQR 14-21) in the SOS study, suicides or non-fatal self-harm events were higher in the surgery group (n=87) than in the control group (n=49; adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1·78, 95% CI 1·23-2·57; p=0·0021); of these events, nine and three were suicides, respectively (3·06, 0·79-11·88; p=0·11). In analyses by primary procedure type, increased risk of suicide or non-fatal self-harm was identified for gastric bypass (3·48, 1·65-7·31; p=0·0010), gastric banding (2·43, 1·23-4·82; p=0·011), and vertical-banded gastroplasty (2·25, 1·37-3·71; p=0·0015) compared with controls. Out of nine deaths by suicide in the SOS surgery group, five occurred after gastric bypass (two primary and three converted procedures). During 149?582 person-years (median 3·9; IQR 2·8-5·2), more suicides or non-fatal self-harm events were reported in the SOReg gastric bypass group (n=341) than in the intensive lifestyle group (n=84; aHR 3·16, 2·46-4·06; p
Notes
CommentIn: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2018 Mar;6(3):161-163 PMID 29329974
Cites: Circulation. 2017 Apr 25;135(17 ):1577-1585 PMID 28258170
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Aug;25(8):1451-1459 PMID 28660652
Cites: Obes Rev. 2013 May;14(5):369-82 PMID 23297762
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):2444-51 PMID 23520203
Cites: Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10 ):1336-42 PMID 27467694
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Apr;21(4):665-72 PMID 23404774
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2017 Feb;135(2):149-158 PMID 27864830
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2017 Apr;5(4):271-279 PMID 28237791
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2016 Mar;4(3):199-200 PMID 26781231
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Oct 22;347:f5934 PMID 24149519
Cites: JAMA. 2015 Jan 6;313(1):62-70 PMID 25562267
Cites: Obes Surg. 2016 Aug;26(8):1659-96 PMID 27412673
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Sep 19;308(11):1122-31 PMID 22990271
Cites: Obes Facts. 2013;6(5):449-68 PMID 24135948
Cites: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Dec;54(6):587-91 PMID 12492605
Cites: JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304 PMID 24915261
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Aug;31(8):1248-61 PMID 17356530
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65 PMID 22215166
Cites: BMJ. 2014 Aug 27;349:g3961 PMID 25164369
Cites: Obes Surg. 2015 Oct;25(10):1893-900 PMID 25703826
Cites: Ann Surg. 2017 Feb;265(2):235-243 PMID 27387654
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2015 Nov;3(11):855-65 PMID 26386667
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Sep 12;308(10):981-2 PMID 22968885
Cites: Obes Surg. 2015 Oct;25(10):1822-32 PMID 25835983
Cites: JAMA Surg. 2013 Apr;148(4):374-7 PMID 23716012
Cites: JAMA Surg. 2014 Dec;149(12):1323-9 PMID 25271405
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Jun 20;307(23):2516-25 PMID 22710289
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):741-52 PMID 17715408
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Sep 19;308(11):1132-41 PMID 22990272
Cites: JAMA Surg. 2016 Mar;151(3):226-32 PMID 26444444
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):753-61 PMID 17715409
Cites: Lancet. 2016 Apr 2;387(10026):1377-1396 PMID 27115820
Cites: Am J Med. 2010 Nov;123(11):1036-42 PMID 20843498
PubMed ID
29329975 View in PubMed
Less detail

Preeclampsia and Hypertension During Pregnancy in Areas with Relatively Low Levels of Traffic Air Pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298297
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2018 04; 22(4):512-519
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
04-2018
Author
Christian Madsen
Siri Eldevik Håberg
Geir Aamodt
Hein Stigum
Per Magnus
Stephanie J London
Wenche Nystad
Per Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Domain for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. christian.madsen@fhi.no.
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2018 04; 22(4):512-519
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - toxicity
Population Surveillance
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Traffic-Related Pollution
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Objectives Air pollution exposure may contribute to the development of preeclampsia and hypertension during pregnancy. However, the evidence for such a relation is still limited. We investigated the associations between exposure for moderate to low levels of air pollution during pregnancy and preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in selected urban and county areas of Norway. Methods This study used a sub-group of 17,533 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Air pollution levels at residential addresses were estimated using land use regression models and back-extrapolated to the period of each pregnancy. Information on preeclampsia and gestational hypertension were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and information on lifestyle factors was collected from questionnaires completed by the women during pregnancy. Results Moderate mean levels of NO2 (13.6?±?6.9 µg/m3) at residential address during pregnancy were not associated with preeclampsia and pregnancy hypertension. We found no statistically significant associations per 10 µg/m3 change in NO2 exposure and preeclampsia (adjusted OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.74, 1.08) or hypertension during pregnancy (adjusted OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.78, 1.06). Conclusions for Practice In this large Norwegian pregnancy cohort, we found no statistically significant associations for moderate to low levels of pregnancy NO2 exposure and preeclampsia or hypertension during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
29285630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of Maternal Psychosocial Stress With Increased Risk of Asthma Development in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301192
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Maria C Magnus
Rosalind J Wright
Espen Røysamb
Christine L Parr
Øystein Karlstad
Christian M Page
Per Nafstad
Siri E Håberg
Stephanie J London
Wenche Nystad
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - complications - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mothers - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - drug therapy
Abstract
Prenatal maternal psychosocial stress might influence the development of childhood asthma. Evaluating paternal psychosocial stress and conducting a sibling comparison could provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding. We examined the associations of parental psychosocial stress during and after pregnancy with asthma at age 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n = 63,626; children born in 2000-2007). Measures of psychosocial stress included lifetime major depressive symptoms, current anxiety/depression symptoms, use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics, life satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, work stress, and social support. Childhood asthma was associated with maternal lifetime major depressive symptoms (adjusted relative risk (aRR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.30), in addition to symptoms of anxiety/depression during pregnancy (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.29) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.28). Maternal negative life events during pregnancy (aRR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.13) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.18) were also associated with asthma. These associations were not replicated when evaluated within sibling groups. There were no associations with paternal psychosocial stress. In conclusion, maternal anxiety/depression and negative life events were associated with offspring asthma, but this might be explained by unmeasured maternal background characteristics that remain stable across deliveries.
PubMed ID
29244063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Paternal and maternal obesity but not gestational weight gain is associated with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298630
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):417-426
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Maria C Magnus
Sjurdur F Olsen
Charlotta Granstrom
Nicolai A Lund-Blix
Jannet Svensson
Jesper Johannesen
Abigail Fraser
Torild Skrivarhaug
Geir Joner
Pål R Njølstad
Ketil Størdal
Lars C Stene
Author Affiliation
Division for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):417-426
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Weight Gain
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Our objective was to examine the associations of parental body mass index (BMI) and maternal gestational weight gain with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. Comparing the associations of maternal and paternal BMI with type 1 diabetes in the offspring will provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding by characteristics linked to BMI in both parents.
We studied 132 331 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) who were born between February 1998 and July 2009. Exposures of interest included parental BMI and maternal gestational weight gain obtained by maternal report. We used Cox-proportional hazards regression to examine the risk of type 1 diabetes (n=499 cases), which was ascertained by national childhood diabetes registers.
The incidence of type 1 diabetes was 32.7 per 100 000 person-years in MoBa and 28.5 per 100 000 person-years in DNBC. Both maternal pre-pregnancy obesity, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.89] and paternal obesity, adjusted HR 1.51 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.04), were associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. The associations were similar after mutual adjustment. In contrast, maternal total gestational weight gain was not associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes, adjusted HR 1.00 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.02) per kilogram increase.
Our study suggests that the association between maternal obesity and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is not likely explained by intrauterine mechanisms, but possibly rather by unknown environmental factors influencing BMI in the family.
PubMed ID
29415279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin A and D intake in pregnancy, infant supplementation, and asthma development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301623
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 05 01; 107(5):789-798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2018
Author
Christine L Parr
Maria C Magnus
Øystein Karlstad
Kristin Holvik
Nicolai A Lund-Blix
Margareta Haugen
Christian M Page
Per Nafstad
Per M Ueland
Stephanie J London
Siri E Håberg
Wenche Nystad
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 05 01; 107(5):789-798
Date
05-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Asthma
Biomarkers
Child
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - urine
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - urine
Young Adult
Abstract
Western diets may provide excess vitamin A, which is potentially toxic and could adversely affect respiratory health and counteract benefits from vitamin D.
The aim of this study was to examine child asthma at age 7 y in relation to maternal intake of vitamins A and D during pregnancy, infant supplementation with these vitamins, and their potential interaction.
We studied 61,676 school-age children (born during 2002-2007) from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort with data on maternal total (food and supplement) nutrient intake in pregnancy (food-frequency questionnaire validated against biomarkers) and infant supplement use at age 6 mo (n = 54,142 children). Linkage with the Norwegian Prescription Database enabled near-complete follow-up (end of second quarter in 2015) for dispensed medications to classify asthma. We used log-binomial regression to calculate adjusted RRs (aRRs) for asthma with 95% CIs.
Asthma increased according to maternal intake of total vitamin A [retinol activity equivalents (RAEs)] in the highest (=2031 RAEs/d) compared with the lowest (=779 RAEs/d) quintile (aRR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40) and decreased for total vitamin D in the highest (=13.6 µg/d) compared with the lowest (=3.5 µg/d) quintile (aRR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.97) during pregnancy. No association was observed for maternal intake in the highest quintiles of both nutrients (aRR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18) and infant supplementation with vitamin D or cod liver oil.
Excess vitamin A (=2.5 times the recommended intake) during pregnancy was associated with increased risk, whereas vitamin D intake close to recommendations was associated with a reduced risk of asthma in school-age children. No association for high intakes of both nutrients suggests antagonistic effects of vitamins A and D. This trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03197233.
PubMed ID
29722838 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.