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13814 records – page 2 of 691.

Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1966
Author
J D Griffin
Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-7
Date
Apr-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services
Humans
Mental health services
Public Health Administration
PubMed ID
5909874 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr 1966
Author
Griffin JD
Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-
Date
Apr 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services
Humans
Mental health services
Public Health Administration
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Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Publication Type
Report
Mental Health and Addiction Valentina Sovkina, Expert on Indigenous Peoples, Agricultural Cooperative “Tundra”, Lovozero, Murmansk Region, Russian Federation SAAMI The Saami is an indigenous small-numbered people in Fennoscandia. This is one people divided by the state borders of 4 countries
  1 document  
Author
Sovkina, Valentina
Author Affiliation
Expert on Indigenous Peoples, Agricultural Cooperative “Tundra”, Lovozero, Murmansk Region, Russian Federation
Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
484459
Keywords
Lovozero
Murmansk
Alcohol
Saami
Documents

Valentina_Sovkina__Mental_Health_and_additction.pdf

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Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 73 pages.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1998
Author
Wolter, Craig A.
Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 73 pages.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Mental health personnel
Notes
ALASKA RA440.8.W65 1998
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Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
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[Mental health among mentally disabled persons]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72014
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2000
Author
E. Skullerud
O M Linaker
A C Svenning
H. Torske
Author Affiliation
Habiliteringstjenesten for voksne i Sør-Trøndelag Brøsetveien 100 7045 Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Date
Nov-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mental health
Mental Retardation - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Norway
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Social Support
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mentally retarded persons have high prevalences of psychiatric disorders and often receive little professional help for them. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a total of 48 mentally retarded inhabitants in a local community, 28 were selected on the basis of possible psychiatric problems. A psychiatrist diagnosed the persons and gave advice based on personal observation, contact with caregivers, and all available documentation. RESULTS: The estimated levels of functioning were adjusted for 19 persons. 32 new psychiatric diagnoses were detected. Milieu changes were recommended for 25 persons, and 26 changes in psychotropic medication were recommended. INTERPRETATION: Although the procedure is workintensive, the results justify the described approach.
PubMed ID
11187162 View in PubMed
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Alaska behavioral health resource guide

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99512
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
  1 website  
Author
Advisory Board on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Alaska Mental Health Board
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counselors
Drug abuse and addiction--information and treatment
Mental health services
Psychiatrists
Psychologists
Social workers
Abstract
This guide has been designed to assist Alaskans in identifying state and community resources available to better understand and treat behavioral health problems.
Online Resources
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Quebec child mental health survey: prevalence of DSM-III-R mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202506
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
N. Gaudet
J. Lambert
M. St-Georges
L. Houde
S. Lépine
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des Prairies Hospital and Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manuals as Topic - standards
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parents
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Teaching
Abstract
The Quebec Child Mental Health Survey (QCMHS) was conducted in 1992 on a representative sample of 2400 children and adolescents aged 6 to 14 years from throughout Quebec. Prevalences of nine Axis-I DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) mental health disorders were calculated based on each informant (for 6-11-year-olds: child, parent, and teacher; for 12-14-year-olds: child and parent). Informant parallelism allows the classification of results of the demographic variables associated with disorders in the logistic regression models. This strategy applies to group variables (correlates of disorders) whereas informant agreement applies to individual diagnoses. Informant parallelism implies that results for two informants or more are in the same direction and significant. In the QCMHS, informant parallelism exists for disruptive disorders, i.e. in two ADHD regression models (child and parent) higher rates among boys and young children, and in three oppositional/conduct disorders regression models (child, parent, and teacher) higher rates among boys. No informant parallelism is observed in the logistic regression models for internalizing disorders, i.e. the patterns of association of demographic variables with anxiety and depressive disorders vary across informants. Urban-rural residence does not emerge as a significant variable in any of the logistic regression models. The overall 6-month prevalences reach 19.9% according to the parent and 15.8% according to the child. The implications of the results for policy makers and clinicians are discussed.
PubMed ID
10190339 View in PubMed
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Keeping mental health reform on course: selecting indicators of mental health system performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186319
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2002;21(1):5-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Kimberley L McEwan
Elliot M Goldner
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2002;21(1):5-16
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
Mental health reform was introduced as a public-sector policy response to identified deficiencies in the mental health services system. The reform agenda, which is underway in most provinces/territories, calls for greater accountability to mental health consumers, their families, and other stakeholders. This paper summarizes the major policy goals (which are the cornerstones of mental health reform) and suggests a series of high-level indicators to assess performance toward achieving these goals. Issues in the selection and measurement of performance indicators as markers of key goals are discussed. The proposed indicator set, while not a comprehensive framework, can provide a multi-dimensional appraisal of mental health system performance and help keep reform on course.
PubMed ID
12630128 View in PubMed
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Mental health: integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation between mental health patients, adult mental health services and social services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70919
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jukka Piippo
Jukka Aaltonen
Author Affiliation
Junior Lecturer, University of Mälardalen, Västerås, Sweden. jukka.piippo@mdh.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Patient satisfaction
Social Work, Psychiatric
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Co-operation between mental health care units and the social services is important in the case of people with social problems who also suffer from mental health problems. However, participation of patients and their families in the treatment process, and co-operation between them and the professionals, are also important. Communication between the professionals, patients and their family members, and the professionals is a crucial factor for co-operation. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences and importance of co-operation for the patients. The data consisted of interviews with 22 mental health patients who were also clients of municipal social services. METHOD: The grounded theory approach was used, focusing on the informants' experiences of the integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation. RESULTS: The findings indicate the importance of the participation of patients and their social networks in psychiatric care or the treatment process. Meetings should be characterized by open and reflexive discussions with all participants' points of view being included, so that fruitful co-operation is possible. However, some negative experiences were also reported, all of which were connected with the professionals' behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Trust and honesty are essential elements in relations between professionals and psychiatric patients, but it cannot be assumed that they will develop naturally. It is the professionals' responsibility to adjust their behaviour so that these elements can be created in a mutual process between patients and professionals. Multidisciplinary teams are a necessity in family-oriented co-operation between psychiatry and social services, and in a satisfactory caring process. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses' work is often individually oriented and nurses are ruled by routines in their work. The mental health caring process should be seen as a shared process between the patient, his/her human environment and professionals for which nurses need skills to their interaction with patients and their social network.
PubMed ID
15361161 View in PubMed
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Increasing culturally responsive care and mental health equity with indigenous community mental health workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299683
Source
Psychol Serv. 2019 May 02; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-02-2019
Author
Victoria M O'Keefe
Mary F Cwik
Emily E Haroz
Allison Barlow
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health.
Source
Psychol Serv. 2019 May 02; :
Date
May-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
There are 600 diverse American Indian/Alaska Native communities that represent strong and resilient nations throughout Indian Country. However, a history of genocidal practices, cultural assaults, and continuing oppression contribute to high rates of mental health and substance use disorders. Underresourced mental health care and numerous barriers to services maintain these disparities. Indigenous community mental health workers hold local understandings of history, culture, and traditional views of health and wellness and may reduce barriers to care while promoting tribal health and economic self-determination and sovereignty. The combination of Native community mental health workers alongside a growing workforce of Indigenous mental health professionals may create an ideal system in which tribal communities are empowered to restore balance and overall wellness, aligning with Native worldviews and healing traditions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
31045405 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and mental health of parents of children with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9842
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Olafur O Guethmundsson
Kristinn Tómasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Landspitali University Hospital, Dalbraut 12, IS-105 Reyjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Mental health of parents and their quality of life is likely to be affected when a child in the family has a psychiatric disorder. The purpose of this study is to assess quality of life and mental health of parents of referred children waiting for service at the only child psychiatric service in Iceland, with reassessment at least 3 months after first attendance to the service. In order to do so, 208 parents of 123 children waiting for psychiatric care were sent the Icelandic Quality of Life (IQL), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and the CAGE screen for alcoholism. For reassessment, responders in the first phase were assessed again with the IQL and GHQ-30, at least 3 months after initiation of child psychiatric interventions. A total of 120 of the 208 parents (58%) responded in the first phase of the study, 49 fathers and 71 mothers. The mean (+/- s, standard deviation) standardized IQL T-score was for the fathers 51+/- 7.5 but significantly lower for the mothers or 45 +/-11.5 (P = 0.001) compared to normal sample of same-age women (T-scores of 50 are normal). Nearly 55% of women compared with 26% of men were psychiatric cases, scoring 5 or higher on the GHQ. According to a CAGE score of 2 and above 16% of fathers and 14% of mother abused alcohol. No significant change occurred in parents GHQ-30 or IQL before and after initiation of treatment. We conclude that mothers of children with mental disorders have poor quality of life, and high prevalence of mental disorders; hence child psychiatry clinics need to ensure that mothers receive appropriate care along with the child.
PubMed ID
12495535 View in PubMed
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Evolution of postpartum mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207592
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Sep;18(3):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
H. Viinamäki
L. Niskanen
P. Pesonen
S. Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Sep;18(3):213-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chronic Disease
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - psychology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
We investigated the postpartum mental health of 139 mothers, 4-8 weeks after delivery and 2 years later. The sample consisted of mothers who attended a maternity center for a routine health check-up 1-2 months after delivery. The occurrence of mental disorders was assessed using a 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The occurrence of mental disorders (> 2 on the GHQ) was 28.1% in the initial check-up and 19.4% 2 years later. Mental health improved in 27 mothers (19%) but remained impaired (i.e. cases) in 12 (9%). Mental health was normal in 85 mothers (61%) during both examinations. Factors predicting chronicity of mental disorder on univariate analysis were poor financial situation, poor social support, problems with a partner and life events perceived as stressful during follow-up. Those with continuing mental-health problems had more psychiatric problems than the others before pregnancy. Most (92%) of these subjects had not become pregnant again. Using a logistic-regression analysis, independent factors predicting chronicity of mental-health problems were the high Zung score (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.65) and a deterioration in relationship with a partner during pregnancy (OR 29, 95% CI 1.83-460). On the other hand, a low Zung score (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.14-1.44) after delivery predicted recovery from mental disorder. A postpartum mental disorder usually resolves spontaneously. However, mental symptoms sometimes persist. The postpartum mental-health of mothers should be assessed, and treatment provided, if necessary.
PubMed ID
9304542 View in PubMed
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[Mental health protection--and challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235340
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Apr 3;74(7):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-1987
Author
A. Blankholm
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Apr 3;74(7):5
Date
Apr-3-1987
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
3646781 View in PubMed
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13814 records – page 2 of 691.