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13543 records – page 2 of 678.

Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Publication Type
Report
Mental Health and Addiction Valentina Sovkina, Expert on Indigenous Peoples, Agricultural Cooperative “Tundra”, Lovozero, Murmansk Region, Russian Federation SAAMI The Saami is an indigenous small-numbered people in Fennoscandia. This is one people divided by the state borders of 4 countries
  1 document  
Author
Sovkina, Valentina
Author Affiliation
Expert on Indigenous Peoples, Agricultural Cooperative “Tundra”, Lovozero, Murmansk Region, Russian Federation
Source
Health of Indigenous and Remote Northern Communities.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
484459
Keywords
Lovozero
Murmansk
Alcohol
Saami
Documents

Valentina_Sovkina__Mental_Health_and_additction.pdf

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Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
O. Kari-Koskinen
P. Karvonen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(1):45-51
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Housing
Humans
Mental health
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Satiation
Scandinavia
Social Class
Urban Population
Abstract
With the present trend away from the designing of individual buildings and towards the systematic planning of whole residential communities, it should be possible to take mental health requirements into account at the planning stage. At present, sociologists are all too seldom consulted on matters of residential planning. When discussing the relationship between housing and mental health one cannot restrict oneself only to the external aspects of the house, but rather one must also consider the opportunities available for the members of the family to satisfy their own needs, both within the home and in its immediate surroundings. Factors which may affect residential requirements include geographical location, type and standard of dwelling and time and continuity of occupation. A move between two districts or groups representing different housing norms and values may lead to withdrawal symptoms in the individual. This may arise equally well from the remoteness of the country districts as from the conflicting pressures brought on by the abundance of contacts available in the large towns. Town life tends to heighten susceptibility to neuroses and personality conflicts. The character of a residential area may affect the mental health of its occupants. Faris & Dunham (4), in studying the incidence of various types of mental illness with an urban population, observed that schizophrenia was most common among people who were in some way isolated from social involvement. The striving for spaciousness in residential areas and the creation of a "summer city" or "garden city" image or a "family-centred way of life" may lead to unexpected problems and have a variety of social consequences. Mental health difficulties have been noted, for example, among housewives in "dormitory" towns or suburbs (11). The institutions required by a community may be grouped into four categories, representing the basic needs of its members. These are (1) economic institutions, (2) social and political organizations, (3) leisure-time clubs and (4) societies and institutions for promoting social integration, including educational, advisory and assistance bodies. The study of satiation processes offers an interesting approach to the relationship between housing and mental health. Man requires new stimuli to motivate him. Boredom and satiation serve to induce passivity and may provoke destructive behaviour and escapism. Finland has the highest percentage of dwellings constructed in the immediate post-war period of any country in Europe, and in respect of the functions of housing many aspects are still apparent which are detrimental to mental health.
PubMed ID
1273551 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Oct 9;42(18):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1975
Author
R. Wendt
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Oct 9;42(18):4-7
Date
Oct-9-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Mental health services
Preventive Health Services
Sweden
PubMed ID
1043417 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Ment Health. 1978 Jun;26(2):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1966
Author
J D Griffin
Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-7
Date
Apr-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services
Humans
Mental health services
Public Health Administration
PubMed ID
5909874 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr 1966
Author
Griffin JD
Source
Can J Public Health. 1966 Apr;57(4):153-
Date
Apr 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services
Humans
Mental health services
Public Health Administration
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Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
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[Mental health among mentally disabled persons]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72014
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2000
Author
E. Skullerud
O M Linaker
A C Svenning
H. Torske
Author Affiliation
Habiliteringstjenesten for voksne i Sør-Trøndelag Brøsetveien 100 7045 Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3246-8
Date
Nov-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mental health
Mental Retardation - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Norway
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Social Support
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mentally retarded persons have high prevalences of psychiatric disorders and often receive little professional help for them. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a total of 48 mentally retarded inhabitants in a local community, 28 were selected on the basis of possible psychiatric problems. A psychiatrist diagnosed the persons and gave advice based on personal observation, contact with caregivers, and all available documentation. RESULTS: The estimated levels of functioning were adjusted for 19 persons. 32 new psychiatric diagnoses were detected. Milieu changes were recommended for 25 persons, and 26 changes in psychotropic medication were recommended. INTERPRETATION: Although the procedure is workintensive, the results justify the described approach.
PubMed ID
11187162 View in PubMed
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Alaska behavioral health resource guide

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99512
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
  1 website  
Author
Advisory Board on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Alaska Mental Health Board
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counselors
Drug abuse and addiction--information and treatment
Mental health services
Psychiatrists
Psychologists
Social workers
Abstract
This guide has been designed to assist Alaskans in identifying state and community resources available to better understand and treat behavioral health problems.
Online Resources
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Quebec child mental health survey: prevalence of DSM-III-R mental health disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202506
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J J Breton
L. Bergeron
J P Valla
C. Berthiaume
N. Gaudet
J. Lambert
M. St-Georges
L. Houde
S. Lépine
Author Affiliation
Rivière-des Prairies Hospital and Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;40(3):375-84
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavioral Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manuals as Topic - standards
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parents
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Teaching
Abstract
The Quebec Child Mental Health Survey (QCMHS) was conducted in 1992 on a representative sample of 2400 children and adolescents aged 6 to 14 years from throughout Quebec. Prevalences of nine Axis-I DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) mental health disorders were calculated based on each informant (for 6-11-year-olds: child, parent, and teacher; for 12-14-year-olds: child and parent). Informant parallelism allows the classification of results of the demographic variables associated with disorders in the logistic regression models. This strategy applies to group variables (correlates of disorders) whereas informant agreement applies to individual diagnoses. Informant parallelism implies that results for two informants or more are in the same direction and significant. In the QCMHS, informant parallelism exists for disruptive disorders, i.e. in two ADHD regression models (child and parent) higher rates among boys and young children, and in three oppositional/conduct disorders regression models (child, parent, and teacher) higher rates among boys. No informant parallelism is observed in the logistic regression models for internalizing disorders, i.e. the patterns of association of demographic variables with anxiety and depressive disorders vary across informants. Urban-rural residence does not emerge as a significant variable in any of the logistic regression models. The overall 6-month prevalences reach 19.9% according to the parent and 15.8% according to the child. The implications of the results for policy makers and clinicians are discussed.
PubMed ID
10190339 View in PubMed
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Keeping mental health reform on course: selecting indicators of mental health system performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186319
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2002;21(1):5-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Kimberley L McEwan
Elliot M Goldner
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2002;21(1):5-16
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
Mental health reform was introduced as a public-sector policy response to identified deficiencies in the mental health services system. The reform agenda, which is underway in most provinces/territories, calls for greater accountability to mental health consumers, their families, and other stakeholders. This paper summarizes the major policy goals (which are the cornerstones of mental health reform) and suggests a series of high-level indicators to assess performance toward achieving these goals. Issues in the selection and measurement of performance indicators as markers of key goals are discussed. The proposed indicator set, while not a comprehensive framework, can provide a multi-dimensional appraisal of mental health system performance and help keep reform on course.
PubMed ID
12630128 View in PubMed
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Mental health: integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation between mental health patients, adult mental health services and social services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70919
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jukka Piippo
Jukka Aaltonen
Author Affiliation
Junior Lecturer, University of Mälardalen, Västerås, Sweden. jukka.piippo@mdh.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):876-85
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Patient satisfaction
Social Work, Psychiatric
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Co-operation between mental health care units and the social services is important in the case of people with social problems who also suffer from mental health problems. However, participation of patients and their families in the treatment process, and co-operation between them and the professionals, are also important. Communication between the professionals, patients and their family members, and the professionals is a crucial factor for co-operation. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences and importance of co-operation for the patients. The data consisted of interviews with 22 mental health patients who were also clients of municipal social services. METHOD: The grounded theory approach was used, focusing on the informants' experiences of the integrated network and family-oriented model for co-operation. RESULTS: The findings indicate the importance of the participation of patients and their social networks in psychiatric care or the treatment process. Meetings should be characterized by open and reflexive discussions with all participants' points of view being included, so that fruitful co-operation is possible. However, some negative experiences were also reported, all of which were connected with the professionals' behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: Trust and honesty are essential elements in relations between professionals and psychiatric patients, but it cannot be assumed that they will develop naturally. It is the professionals' responsibility to adjust their behaviour so that these elements can be created in a mutual process between patients and professionals. Multidisciplinary teams are a necessity in family-oriented co-operation between psychiatry and social services, and in a satisfactory caring process. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses' work is often individually oriented and nurses are ruled by routines in their work. The mental health caring process should be seen as a shared process between the patient, his/her human environment and professionals for which nurses need skills to their interaction with patients and their social network.
PubMed ID
15361161 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and mental health of parents of children with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9842
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Olafur O Guethmundsson
Kristinn Tómasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Landspitali University Hospital, Dalbraut 12, IS-105 Reyjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):413-7
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Mental health of parents and their quality of life is likely to be affected when a child in the family has a psychiatric disorder. The purpose of this study is to assess quality of life and mental health of parents of referred children waiting for service at the only child psychiatric service in Iceland, with reassessment at least 3 months after first attendance to the service. In order to do so, 208 parents of 123 children waiting for psychiatric care were sent the Icelandic Quality of Life (IQL), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and the CAGE screen for alcoholism. For reassessment, responders in the first phase were assessed again with the IQL and GHQ-30, at least 3 months after initiation of child psychiatric interventions. A total of 120 of the 208 parents (58%) responded in the first phase of the study, 49 fathers and 71 mothers. The mean (+/- s, standard deviation) standardized IQL T-score was for the fathers 51+/- 7.5 but significantly lower for the mothers or 45 +/-11.5 (P = 0.001) compared to normal sample of same-age women (T-scores of 50 are normal). Nearly 55% of women compared with 26% of men were psychiatric cases, scoring 5 or higher on the GHQ. According to a CAGE score of 2 and above 16% of fathers and 14% of mother abused alcohol. No significant change occurred in parents GHQ-30 or IQL before and after initiation of treatment. We conclude that mothers of children with mental disorders have poor quality of life, and high prevalence of mental disorders; hence child psychiatry clinics need to ensure that mothers receive appropriate care along with the child.
PubMed ID
12495535 View in PubMed
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Source
Sykepleien. 1968 Aug 15;55(16):448
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1968
Source
Sykepleien. 1968 Aug 15;55(16):448
Date
Aug-15-1968
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Humans
Mental health services
Norway
Nursing
PubMed ID
5187864 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):221-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Siv Kvernmo
Author Affiliation
Center of Sami Health Research, Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. siv.kvernmo@ism.uit.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):221-34
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Eating Disorders - ethnology
Humans
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Smoking - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Abstract
Sami children and adolescents are the indigenous youngsters in Norway, mainly resided in the arctic part of the country. While disadvantaged living conditions, risk behavior and psychososial health problems has been shown for children and youth from many indigenous groups worldwide, the research among Sami youngsters is sparse. However, recent research show that compared to the Norwegian majority group, Sami children and adolescents have just as good mental health as their majority peers. They also show less risk taking behavior as substance and drug use, have less eating problems and have a stronger body satisfaction. However, the smoking rates are high as for their Norwegian counterparts. Intragroup studies show that Sami adolescents grown up in Sami dominated areas, have a strong bicultural identification, are practicing more Sami cultural behavior and have a better mental health compared to Sami peers in marginal Sami areas. Ethnocultural factors have only a slight impact on behavior problems among young Sami and particularly among boys in the marginal Sami areas.
PubMed ID
15526926 View in PubMed
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13543 records – page 2 of 678.