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Prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency in five immigrant groups living in Oslo, Norway: the Oslo Immigrant Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70952
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan;59(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
K. Holvik
H E Meyer
E. Haug
L. Brunvand
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. kristin.holvik@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan;59(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Sri Lanka - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Vietnam - ethnology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and to identify possible predictors of vitamin D deficiency in five main immigrant groups in Oslo. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based. SETTING: City of Oslo. SUBJECTS: In total, 491 men and 509 women with native countries Turkey, Sri Lanka, Iran, Pakistan and Vietnam living in the county of Oslo. RESULTS: Median serum 25(OH)D level (s-25(OH)D) was 28 nmol/l, ranging from 21 nmol/l in women born in Pakistan to 40 nmol/l in men born in Vietnam. Overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency defined as s-25(OH)D
PubMed ID
15280907 View in PubMed
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Predictors of mortality in older hip fracture inpatients admitted to an orthogeriatric unit in oslo, norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140388
Source
J Aging Health. 2010 Dec;22(8):1114-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kristin Holvik
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Mette Irene Martinsen
Ludvig Fjeld Solheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. kristin.holvik@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Aging Health. 2010 Dec;22(8):1114-31
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual
Female
Geriatrics
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Status Indicators
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To identify to which degree patient-related factors (age, gender, place of residence, general health condition, comorbidity) and hospital-related factors (waiting time for surgery, type of surgery, in-hospital complications, length of stay) may predict 1-year mortality in elderly hip fracture patients in an orthogeriatric unit, to optimize treatment and care.
In-hospital patient information was routinely collected by multidisciplinary staff and entered into a database. Information about mortality was obtained for 567 patients aged 65 and above. Multivariate logistic regression was performed.
Overall mortality was 23.5%, but there was a large variation in mortality according to age, gender, comorbidity, and place of residence. Independent predictors of mortality were admittance from nursing home (risk ratio [RR] = 3.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.37-4.43 compared with home dwellers) and a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (RR = 1.75 and 95% CI = 1.24-2.46, for ASA = 3 compared with ASA = 2). Male gender, increasing age, increasing number of comorbid conditions, and having fallen indoors were indicators, but not independent predictors, of higher mortality.
Almost one fourth of older hip fracture patients in this unit died within a year. The most important predictor was admittance from nursing home, which was associated with comorbidity and frailty. More attention to patients from nursing homes is needed in the health care system.
PubMed ID
20881106 View in PubMed
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Use of warfarin is associated with delay in surgery for hip fracture in older patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135847
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2011 Feb;39(1):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Mette Irene Martinsen
Kristin Holvik
Ludvig Fjeld Solheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ahranhoff@yahoo.no
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2011 Feb;39(1):37-40
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - surgery
Humans
International Normalized Ratio
Male
Norway
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Abstract
Delay in surgery for hip fractures in older patients may affect mortality and the risk of delirium. Delay in surgery may occur as a result of several factors. It has not been established whether certain patient-related factors, such as a high international normalized ratio (INR) caused by warfarin treatment is associated with delay in surgery. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between warfarin treatment, INR, and time from admission to surgery.
This is an observational study based on data from a database of all hip fracture patients aged = 65 years who were admitted to an orthogeriatric unit. The database included data from 1192 consecutive patients admitted from January 2007 to April 2010. Data were collected during routine work. Use of warfarin, patient characteristics, medical complications, length of stay, and time from admission to surgery were registered from the patients' records, and INR at admission in warfarin users.
Warfarin was used by 117 (9.8%) patients at admission, which included more men (n = 42; 14.4%) than women (n = 75; 8.3%) (P = 0.003). The mean age was 85 years, with no difference between users and nonusers. Warfarin users had more comorbid diseases (mean, 2.1 vs 1.8; P = 0.003), poorer health status (American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3-5 in 77.8% vs 51.0%), and longer waiting time for surgery compared with nonusers (mean, 23 vs 12 hours; P
PubMed ID
21441757 View in PubMed
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Osteoporosis and osteopenia in the distal forearm predict all-cause mortality independent of grip strength: 22-year follow-up in the population-based Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294256
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2447-2456
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
A V Hauger
A Bergland
K Holvik
A Ståhle
N Emaus
B H Strand
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet Postboks 4 St. Olavs plass, 0130, Oslo, Norway. anvoha@oslomet.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2447-2456
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Low bone mineral density (BMD) gives an increased risk of fractures, which can lead to premature death. Can BMD of the wrist predict mortality? BMD consistent with osteopenia and osteoporosis gave a significantly increased risk of death for both men and women in a general population in Tromsø, Norway.
To investigate if bone mineral density (BMD) levels of the distal forearm, consistent with osteopenia and osteoporosis, can predict mortality and if grip strength is an effect modifier.
The study population constituted 6565 participants aged 50-79 years at baseline in the Tromsø Study wave 4 conducted in 1994-1995. Forearm BMD measured by SXA was categorized as "normal," "osteopenia," or "osteoporosis" following WHO's definition. Cox regression with all-cause mortality as the outcome over 22 years of follow-up was performed for men and women separately, adjusting for health-related factors, as well as BMD by grip strength interaction. A secondary analysis with a 15-year follow-up also adjusted for hip fractures and osteoporotic fractures.
During follow-up, 3176 of participants died (47%). Those categorized as osteoporotic had higher mortality hazard ratio (HR) compared to those with normal BMD; men HR?=?1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19, 1.58) and women HR?=?1.32 (1.14, 1.53) were adjusted for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking habits, education, health status, chronic diseases, and grip strength. Corresponding HRs for osteopenia were men HR?=?1.13 (1.00, 1.27) and women HR?=?1.17 (1.01, 1.35). Further adjustments for fractures did only marginally attenuate the results, and HRs were still significant. There was no grip strength by BMD interaction.
Men and women with low distal forearm BMD values, consistent with osteoporosis or osteopenia, had an increased mortality compared to normal BMD participants. High grip strength did not modify this association, and the association remained after adjustment for a range of health-related factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30094609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Osteoporosis and osteopenia in the distal forearm predict all-cause mortality independent of grip strength: 22-year follow-up in the population-based Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297884
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2447-2456
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
A V Hauger
A Bergland
K Holvik
A Ståhle
N Emaus
B H Strand
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, OsloMet - storbyuniversitetet Postboks 4 St. Olavs plass, 0130, Oslo, Norway. anvoha@oslomet.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2447-2456
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Age Distribution
Aged
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forearm - physiopathology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hip Fractures - mortality - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - mortality - physiopathology
Osteoporotic Fractures - mortality - physiopathology
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Low bone mineral density (BMD) gives an increased risk of fractures, which can lead to premature death. Can BMD of the wrist predict mortality? BMD consistent with osteopenia and osteoporosis gave a significantly increased risk of death for both men and women in a general population in Tromsø, Norway.
To investigate if bone mineral density (BMD) levels of the distal forearm, consistent with osteopenia and osteoporosis, can predict mortality and if grip strength is an effect modifier.
The study population constituted 6565 participants aged 50-79 years at baseline in the Tromsø Study wave 4 conducted in 1994-1995. Forearm BMD measured by SXA was categorized as "normal," "osteopenia," or "osteoporosis" following WHO's definition. Cox regression with all-cause mortality as the outcome over 22 years of follow-up was performed for men and women separately, adjusting for health-related factors, as well as BMD by grip strength interaction. A secondary analysis with a 15-year follow-up also adjusted for hip fractures and osteoporotic fractures.
During follow-up, 3176 of participants died (47%). Those categorized as osteoporotic had higher mortality hazard ratio (HR) compared to those with normal BMD; men HR?=?1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19, 1.58) and women HR?=?1.32 (1.14, 1.53) were adjusted for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking habits, education, health status, chronic diseases, and grip strength. Corresponding HRs for osteopenia were men HR?=?1.13 (1.00, 1.27) and women HR?=?1.17 (1.01, 1.35). Further adjustments for fractures did only marginally attenuate the results, and HRs were still significant. There was no grip strength by BMD interaction.
Men and women with low distal forearm BMD values, consistent with osteoporosis or osteopenia, had an increased mortality compared to normal BMD participants. High grip strength did not modify this association, and the association remained after adjustment for a range of health-related factors.
PubMed ID
30094609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biochemical markers of bone turnover and their relation to forearm bone mineral density in persons of Pakistani and Norwegian background living in Oslo, Norway: The Oslo Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80083
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Nov;155(5):693-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Holvik Kristin
Meyer Haakon E
Søgaard Anne Johanne
Selmer Randi
Haug Egil
Falch Jan A
Author Affiliation
Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Nov;155(5):693-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid Phosphatase - blood
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Resorption - ethnology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forearm - anatomy & histology
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - epidemiology
Isoenzymes - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteocalcin - blood
Osteogenesis - physiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Vitamin D Deficiency - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether Pakistanis have increased bone turnover compared with ethnic Norwegians due to their high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and whether the relation between bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) differs between Pakistanis and ethnic Norwegians. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in the city of Oslo in 2000-2001. Random samples of 132 community-dwelling Pakistani men and women of ages 40, 45, and 59-60 years, and 580 community-dwelling Norwegian men and women of ages 45 and 59-60 years are included in this substudy. METHODS: Venous serum samples were drawn for measurements of markers of the vitamin D endocrine system and the bone turnover markers osteocalcin (s-OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (s-bone ALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (s-TRACP). BMD was measured at the forearm by single-energy X-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: Pakistanis had higher s-bone ALP compared with Norwegians. Mean (95% CI) age-adjusted levels were 22.5 (21.0, 24.1) U/l in Pakistani men versus 19.3 (18.6, 20.1) U/l in Norwegian men, P
PubMed ID
17062885 View in PubMed
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The association between alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture differs by age and gender in Cohort of Norway: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299340
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
A J Søgaard
A H Ranhoff
H E Meyer
T K Omsland
W Nystad
G S Tell
K Holvik
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. anne.johanne.sogaard@fhi.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and hip fracture differed by gender: Men aged 30-59 years drinking frequently or 14+ gl/week had higher risk than moderate drinkers. No significant association was seen in older men. Women not drinking alcohol had higher risk than those drinking moderately both regarding frequency and amount.
We aimed to examine alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture according to age and gender in the population-based Cohort of Norway (1994-2003).
Socio-demographics, lifestyle, and health were self-reported and weight and height were measured in 70,568 men and 71,357 women =?30 years. Information on subsequent hip fractures was retrieved from hospitals' electronic patient registries during 1994-2013. Frequency of alcohol consumption was categorized: never/seldom, moderate (=?2-3 times/week), or frequent (=?4 times/week), and amount as number of glasses per week: 0, 1-6, 7-13, 14-27, and 28+. Type of alcohol (wine vs. beer/hard liquor) was also examined. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) stratified on gender and baseline age
PubMed ID
30006884 View in PubMed
Less detail

Excess mortality following hip fracture: impact of self-perceived health, smoking, and body mass index. A NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291349
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2017 Mar; 28(3):881-887
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
S M Solbakken
H E Meyer
H Stigum
A J Søgaard
K Holvik
J H Magnus
T K Omsland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Society, Department of Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, N-0318, Oslo, Norway. s.m.solbakken@studmed.uio.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2017 Mar; 28(3):881-887
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Health status
Hip Fractures - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - etiology - mortality
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Self-perceived health, smoking, and body mass index measured years before the hip fracture predicted excess post-hip fracture mortality, and even hip fracture patients with the most favorable levels of these risk factors had higher mortality than subjects who did not fracture.
This study aimed to investigate the impact of pre-fracture self-perceived health, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) on excess post-hip fracture mortality using matched peers without hip fracture as reference.
The study was based on the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) consisting of 10 regional health studies (1994-2003) and the NOREPOS hip fracture database (1994-2008). A matched cohort design was used to compare survival between hip fracture patients and subjects without fracture (matched on gender, age at participation in CONOR, and study site). Subjects aged =60 years were included. Hazard ratios were estimated using stratified Cox regression. Age-standardized mortality was also calculated.
Overall, hip fracture patients (N = 3177) had a 2.26-fold (95 % CI 2.13, 2.40) increased mortality compared to matched subjects (N = 20,282). The highest excess mortality was found in hip fracture patients reporting poor health (HR 4.08, 95 % CI 3.17, 5.26) and daily smoking (HR 3.25, 95 % CI 2.89, 3.66) and in patients with BMI
Notes
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PubMed ID
27714442 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile Update: The Janus Serum Bank Cohort in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295530
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1101-1102f
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017

Nationwide data on municipal drinking water and hip fracture: could calcium and magnesium be protective? A NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112446
Source
Bone. 2013 Nov;57(1):84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Cecilie Dahl
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Grethe S Tell
Trond Peder Flaten
Dag Hongve
Tone Kristin Omsland
Kristin Holvik
Haakon E Meyer
Geir Aamodt
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Cecilie.Dahl@fhi.no.
Source
Bone. 2013 Nov;57(1):84-91
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium, Dietary - analysis
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Magnesium - analysis
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Urbanization
Abstract
Norway has a high incidence of hip fractures, and the incidence varies by degree of urbanization. This variation may reflect a difference in underlying environmental factors, perhaps variations in the concentration of calcium and magnesium in municipal drinking water. A trace metal survey (1986-1991) in 556 waterworks (supplying 64% of the Norwegian population) was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all, 5472 men and 13,604 women aged 50-85years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, urbanization degree, region of residence, type of water source, and pH. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in drinking water were generally low. An inverse association was found between concentration of magnesium and risk of hip fracture in both genders (IRR men highest vs. lowest tertile=0.80, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.87; IRR women highest vs. lowest tertile=0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95), but no consistent association between calcium and hip fracture risk was observed. The highest tertile of urbanization degree (city), compared to the lowest (rural), was related to a 23 and 24% increase in hip fracture risk in men and women, respectively. The association between magnesium and hip fracture did not explain the variation in hip fracture risk between city and rural areas. Magnesium in drinking water may have a protective role against hip fractures; however this association should be further investigated.
PubMed ID
23831379 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.