Skip header and navigation
Did you mean herrström? Also try hellstrom.

Refine By

17 records – page 1 of 2.

Acute glomerulonephritis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and dental amalgam in Swedish children: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34562
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1996 Nov 22;191(3):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1996
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
S. Aronson
A. Holmén
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1996 Nov 22;191(3):277-82
Date
Nov-22-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Glomerulonephritis - chemically induced - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mercury Compounds - adverse effects
Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch - chemically induced - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The issue of adverse health effects from dental amalgam and the concurrent low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury have been scrutinized by several Swedish expert groups during the past years. Only rarely have amalgam fillings in children been related to health effects. Experimental studies in genetically disposed animals have shown that low doses of inorganic mercury can induce autoimmune glomerulonephritis. The present case-control study included 31 children with acute glomerulonephritis and 33 with Henoch-Schönlein purpura retrieved from an in-patient register for the period 1973-1992 at the county hospital in Halmstad, Sweden. The median age was 10 and 9 years, respectively, for the two diagnostic groups. Dental clinics reported amalgam burden of the patients during the year before the date of diagnosis. Corresponding data were obtained for three randomly selected controls for each case, drawn from the case records of the same dental clinics, with matching for age and sex. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.42 (0.49, 4.11) for Henoch-Schönlein purpura, 0.59 (0.25, 1.38) for acute glomerulonephritis and 0.84 (0.40, 1.75) for both diseases combined. The results of this study did not indicate increased disease risk in relation to amalgam burden.
PubMed ID
8931347 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic disease and the infestation of Enterobius vermicularis in Swedish children 4-10 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31743
Source
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2001;11(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P. Herrström
K A Henricson
A. Råberg
A. Karlsson
B. Högstedt
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden. per.herrstrom@lthalland.se
Source
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2001;11(3):157-60
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Enterobiasis - complications - immunology
Enterobius - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology - parasitology
Male
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The possible association between certain childhood infections and the propensity to develop allergic disease may include intestinal helminth infections. The experiences of such associations derive mainly from studies in tropical areas, and the results are not clear-cut. Objective: To explore the association between Enterobius vermicularis and allergic disease in Swedish children 4 to 10 years of age. METHOD: The occurrence of E. vermicularis was examined by perianal tape tests in 70 allergic children recovered from a pediatric register of positive skin-prick tests. A nonallergic control group (n = 102) was gathered from a cohort of children previously examined for the prevalence of E. vermicularis and allergic symptoms. RESULTS: In the allergic group 26 of the 70 cases (37%) had a positive tape-test for E. vermicularis, compared to 23 of the 102 cases (23%) in the nonallergic control group (p = .037). CONCLUSION: The results indicate that E. vermicularis could be more frequent in children with allergic disease as defined by allergic symptoms and a positive skin-prick test compared to nonallergic children, i. e., those without a history of allergic disease. These data, however, do not allow any conclusion on the nature of the possible association between E. vermicularis and allergic disease.
PubMed ID
11831446 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic disease, immunoglobulins, exposure to mercury and dental amalgam in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15819
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
N. Holthuis
A. Schütz
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Eczema - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - blood
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39 (51%) had asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or eczema. Similar amalgam burden and P-Hg levels were observed in students with (n = 39) and without (n = 38) allergic disease (P = 0.48 and P = 0.98, respectively). As expected, IgE levels were significantly higher in the group with allergic disease (P = 0.006), but there was no association between P-Hg and IgE. The P-Hg levels were very low (median 1.50 nmol/l) and correlated significantly (r = 0.31) with the small number of amalgam surfaces (P = 0.007). Thirty-seven students had no amalgam fillings. P-Hg levels did not associate significantly with IgA, but did so with IgG2 (r = 0.33; P = 0.003). No conclusive correlation was observed between IgG2 and amalgam fillings. The findings of this study in 19-year-old subjects differ from earlier data obtained in a sample 4 years younger. The possibility of chance in the association between P-Hg levels and IgG2 must, however, be considered.
PubMed ID
9192218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic diseases, dental health, and socioeconomic situation of Swedish teenagers. Allergy, dental health, and social situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15971
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
Author Affiliation
Hertig Knut Health Centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):57-61
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To study the association between allergic diseases (eczema, allergic rhino-conjunctivitis, and asthma), dental health, and the socioeconomic situation of Swedish teenagers. DESIGN--Cross-sectional survey with a questionnaire for allergic symptoms and parents' occupation (for socioeconomic classification); current dental status from the Public Dental Service. Bronchial reversibility test. Telephone inquiry of asthma cases. SETTING--Primary care and a school in the centre of a middle-sized Swedish town (approx. 80,000 inhabitants). PARTICIPANTS--137 pupils of both sexes, 13-15 years old. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of reported cases with allergic disease and outcome of bronchial reversibility test in relation to social class. Number of validated cases of asthma. Number of filled tooth surfaces in healthy and diseased cases. RESULTS--Socioeconomic situation was found to associate with dental health, i.e. more fillings in lower social classes (P = 0.01), and with allergic disease, i.e. asthma and rhino-conjunctivitis (P = 0.05). Individuals from the upper social classes seemed prone to overreport asthmatic symptoms, whereas teenagers in the lower classes did the opposite, as indicated by five cases of pathologic values after bronchial reversibility tests in individuals who did not report asthmatic symptoms. CONCLUSION--The study indicates that socioeconomic situation associates significantly with both dental health and allergic disease. No association was found between dental health and allergic diseases.
PubMed ID
8009102 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birthplace and social characteristics as risk factors for acute myocardial infarction in the province of Halland, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52232
Source
Public Health. 2002 Sep;116(5):279-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
A. Baigi
A. Holmén
B. Högstedt
A. Odén
P. Herrström
Author Affiliation
Research & Development Unit of Primary Health Care, Province of Halland, Falhenberg, Sweden. amir.baigi@lthalland.se
Source
Public Health. 2002 Sep;116(5):279-84
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Occupations
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the impact of birthplace and socio-economic characteristics on the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural Swedish province. A case control study was performed and cases were all patients 30-72-y-old treated for the first time for an AMI during 1980-1992 and identified in a computerised hospital register. Three controls for each case were randomly selected from the national population register and were matched for gender, age and municipality. Birthplace ie within or outside the province, and a variety of socio-economic background factors were determined for cases and controls. The study comprised a total of 18 948 individuals including cases and controls.Altogether 4737 cases of AMI were identified whereof 3514 were men. Being born in the province was associated with the lowest risk for AMI in both sexes (RR=0.62, CI 0.57-0.67 for men and RR=0.61, CI 0.53-0.69 for women). A substantially reduced risk for men was found in farmers. In both sexes, high socio-economic status had a favourable effect on the risk to suffer an AMI. Being born in the province carried the lowest risk for AMI in both sexes and was independent of other tested socio-economic factors (income, education, occupation, and civil status). Province characteristics might be associated with this protective factor. Alternatively, migration as such might include unfavourable exposures that increase the risk for AMI among those who had moved to the province.
PubMed ID
12209403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Causes of death between 1911-1950 in a Swedish province with a population characterized by longevity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182379
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(6):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Amir Baigi
Benkt Högstedt
Sven-Olof Isacsson
Anders Odén
Per Herrström
Author Affiliation
Research & Development Unitof Primary Health Care, Halland, Sweden. amir.baigi@lthalland.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(6):418-27
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death - trends
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Population Surveillance
Public Health
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Life expectancy in Sweden is among the highest in the world, and the province of Halland has the highest life expectancy in Sweden today. In an earlier paper the authors reported that life expectancy in the province of Halland in the south-west of the country was approx. 3.5 years above the national average between 1911 and 1950. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of different causes of death on life expectancy in Sweden and the distribution of these causes of death in Halland compared with Sweden as a whole during the same period of time.
Causes of death between 1911 and 1950 in the whole of Sweden and in Halland were obtained from the archives of Statistics Sweden. A trend analysis was performed on the impact of the various causes of death on life expectancy in Sweden. Calendar year, age, and sex were controlled for in a Poisson model. The distribution and incidence of the most frequent causes of death were compared between Halland and Sweden as a whole.
The decreasing mortality risk due to infectious diseases and the simultaneous increase in the risk of mortality from tumours and circulatory diseases contributed most to the change in life expectancy in Sweden. In Halland there was a lower mortality risk in the seven most important causes of death, which accounted for approx 80% of all deaths during the study period.
The lower mortality risk from infectious diseases mostly favoured the improvement in life expectancy in Halland up to the mid-1930s. Thereafter, a low mortality risk from tumours and particularly circulatory diseases gained increasing importance although there was always a difference in favour of Halland from the beginning of the study period. Thus, the positive trend in life expectancy that favours Halland today seems to have existed for a long period of time.
PubMed ID
14675933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic musculoskeletal pain, prevalence rates, and sociodemographic associations in a Swedish population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194316
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jun;28(6):1369-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
S. Bergman
P. Herrström
K. Högström
I F Petersson
B. Svensson
L T Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Centre Hertig Knut, Bryggaregatan 1, S-302 43 Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jun;28(6):1369-77
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Chronic Disease
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pain - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of chronic regional and widespread musculoskeletal pain in a sample of the general adult population and study the association to age, sex, socioeconomic class, immigration, and housing area.
A cross sectional survey with a postal questionnaire to 3928 inhabitants on the west coast of Sweden.
The age and sex adjusted prevalence of chronic regional pain (CRP) was 23.9% and chronic widespread pain (CWP) 11.4% among 2425 subjects who responded to the complete questionnaire. Odds ratio (OR) for CWP showed a systematic increasing gradient with age and was highest in the age group 59-74 yrs (OR 6.36, 95% CI 3.85-10.50) vs age group 20-34 yrs. CWP was also associated with female sex (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.41-2.61), being an immigrant (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.22-2.77), living in a socially compromised housing area (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.48-6.27), and being an assistant nonmanual lower level employee (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.09-3.38) or manual worker (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.65-4.49) vs being an intermediate/higher nonmanual employee. OR for CRP showed a systematic increasing gradient with age and was highest in the age group 59-74 yrs (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.62-3.05) vs age group 20-34 yrs. CRP was also associated with being a manual worker (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.19-2.23) vs being an intermediate/higher nonmanual employee.
Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common in the general population. Sociodemographic variables were overall more frequently and strongly associated with CWP than with CRP, which indicates different pathophysiology in the development or preservation of pain in the 2 groups.
PubMed ID
11409133 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic widespread pain: a three year followup of pain distribution and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10000
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Apr;29(4):818-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Stefan Bergman
Per Herrström
Lennart T Jacobsson
Ingemar F Petersson
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Centre Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden. stefan@halmstad.net
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Apr;29(4):818-25
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the change of pain reports over time in 3 cohorts derived from the general population: (1) no chronic pain (NCP; n = 1156); (2) chronic regional pain (CRP; n = 502); and (3) chronic widespread pain (CWP; n = 242). To identify risk factors that predict the development or persistence of chronic widespread pain. METHODS: A 3-year followup from 1995 to 1998 with postal questionnaire to 2425 subjects of both sexes aged 20-74 years on the west coast of Sweden. RESULTS: At followup, a larger proportion of subjects with initial CRP compared to initial NCP reported CWP (16.4 and 2.2%, respectively; p
PubMed ID
11950027 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental amalgam, low-dose exposure to mercury, and urinary proteins in young Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215677
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;50(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Herrström
A. Schütz
G. Raihle
N. Holthuis
B. Högstedt
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;50(2):103-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Creatinine - urine
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - urine
Proteinuria - chemically induced - urine
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury can cause kidney injury. Evidence gained from occupational medicine indicates that individuals who are exposed to only environmental sources, including amalgam tooth fillings, are at very little risk. Animal experiments, however, have revealed glomerular lesions of immunologic origin after low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury. In this study, the association between the number of amalgam tooth surfaces, urinary mercury, and proteinuria was explored in a sample of 48 randomly selected, apparently healthy male students who were 17-22 y of age. Presence of any of the following proteins in two separate urine samples was considered to be potentially indicative of any tubular and/or glomerular lesion: albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin (HC-protein), kappa and lambda light chains, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. No significant relationship was found between any of the proteins and amalgam or urinary mercury. The results of this study did not suggest that amalgam fillings cause kidney dysfunction in humans.
PubMed ID
7786045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental care of autistic children within the non-specialized Public Dental Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31770
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(3):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Fahlvik-Planefeldt
P. Herrström
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Service, Kungsbacka, Sweden. christina.fahlvik-planefeldt@lthalland.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(3):113-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autistic Disorder - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cooperative Behavior
DMF Index
Delivery of Health Care
Dental Anxiety - classification
Dental Care for Children
Dental Care for Disabled
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Gingivitis - classification
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Oral Hygiene
Orthodontics, Corrective
Primary Health Care
Public Health Dentistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
Children with an autistic disorder may need more dental care and may also be more difficult to treat than healthy children. This study compared oral health in autistic and healthy children. Also explored was the dental management of autistic children within the non-specialized Public Dental Service. The study was designed as a case-control study with all cases of autistic disorders aged 3-19 years identified within a primary care area in southwest Sweden. One dentist did a clinical investigation of cases and one control per case. The patients, or their parents, answered a questionnaire. 28 patients were identified and 20 (71%) agreed to participate in the study. Cases and controls had a similar prevalence of fillings, caries, gingivitis and degree of oral hygiene. However, the need of orthodontic treatment seemed to be greater among the autistic children. According to a standardised assessment, autistic children were less able to cooperate in the dental treatment. Approximately 30% of the cases had occasionally been subjected to specialized dental care. The results of this study indicate that the care provided to autistic children within the non-specialized Public Dental Service is satisfactory, provided that there is access to a paediatric dentist when necessary.
PubMed ID
11813447 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.