Skip header and navigation

Refine By

585 records – page 2 of 30.

Alaskan Hematophagous insects, their feeding habits and potential as vectors of pathogenic organisms. II: The feeding habits and colonization of subarctic mosquitoes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298784
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1965
food that is available, as well as the protective cover. These factors largely determine distribution of the terrestrial mammals and also the mosquitoes. The topography of Alaska exerts a strong influence upon the climate. The coastal mountains of the Alaska Range are not only the highest and some
  1 document  
Author
Hopla, Cluff E.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Date
July 1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9571565
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Insects
Mosquitoes
Diphtheria
Host preference
Zoonoses
Haematophagus arthropods
Abstract
Feeding habits of mosquitoes of the taiga and tundra were studied. Greater emphasis was given to those of the taiga, however, because of the longer mosquito season and the greater variety of genera and species present. Using an exposed area of human forearm (54 square inches) and a similar area of shaved rabbit abdomen, biting records were compiled. Mosquitoes were collected by aspirator after the proboscis was fully inserted. Twice as many mosquitoes were collected from the human as from the rabbit, with Aedes excrucians, A. punctor, A. intrudens and A. pionips predominating in the order given. A tower was built, with platforms at 6-foot intervals up to 42 feet, to study vertical distribution and host preference. Domestic chickens, white laboratory rabbits and varying hares, along with empty control boxes, were placed at the various heights. Approximately 80% of the 10,722 specimens obtained were collected in the first 18 feet. The percentages of mosquitoes that were engorged when collected from the bait boxes were as follows: chickens, 18.2%; white rabbits, 70%; and varying hares, 92%. Through field observations and laboratory studies, small rodents (microtines) and passerine birds are not thought significant sources of blood meals, but hares, ground squirrels and larger mammals are. Using insect nets, 46,123 specimens were collected in the vicinity of the tower, both from vegetation and aerially up to height of 6 feet. Only six showed evidence of a recent blood meal. Evidence indicates that most subarctic mosquitoes take but one blood meal, a fact of considerable importance when considering them as vectors of zoonoses. Studies of the natural history of Culiseta alaskaensis indicated that the unfed adult females overwinter close to the ground in dense growths of grass underneath the snow cover where the temperature range is from 16-20° F. In the laboratory, C. alaskaensis lived only about one week at 0° F. Chromatographic studies did not reveal the presence of glycerol compounds in the hemolymph.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-12 vol.2
Documents
Less detail

CNU-1/P sustenance kit modification (T-33).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298785
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-22. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
November 1965
exposure to arctic cold following ejection from the airplane. The CNU-1 /P kit, with its basic survival items, does not supply the survivor with a sleeping bag of any kind. The fact that a would-be survivor can exist for 3 - 5 days without food, provided he can keep warm, dictates the need for adequate
  1 document  
Author
Schumann, John R.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-22. 11 p.
Date
November 1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1395376
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Cold weather
Survival gear
Sustenance kit
Component packaging
Jump testing
Jump evaluation
Deployment hazards or discomfort
Abstract
At the request of the Alaskan Air Command, this Project was established to provide adequate cold-weather survival protection for T-33 pilots who utilize the seat-pack parachute. Pilots in this category had not previously been so equipped. After extensive evaluation and operational testing, the Alaskan Air Command approved modification of CNU-1/P for use with the seat-pack parachute in the T-33 jet aircraft. The kit is now in use during the period October through May. In addition to basic survival items, the kit contains a down-filled coat, SRU-6P; mittens, SRU-10P; and half bag or foot sack, SRU-12P. The problem of bulk reduction was solved by tufting, using manual pressure and upholstering methods. Packaging of the down-filled clothing into the CNU-1/P kit can be done by local Personal Equipment Technicians with a small expenditure of man-hours and materials.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.65-22
Documents
Less detail

Physiological observations on subarctic bears under winter den conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298789
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-15. 12 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1966
were expected to initiate the state of winter rest. On November 20 the bear was given a large supply of straw in which it constructed a den. From this time on, a temperature of 30° F was maintained in the building, and the usual excess of food was provided. On November 26 two conditions were
  1 document  
Author
Folk, G. Edgar, Jr.
Simmonds, Richard C.
Folk, Mary A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-15. 12 p.
Date
March 1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1290580
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Grizzly bears
Winter
Heart rate
Urinary output
Body temperature
Black bears
Hypothermia
Dormancy (hibernation)
Abstract
Heart rates, body temperature, and urinary output were studied in a variety of activity states in one or all of a group of four bears (two grizzly bears, Ursus horribilis, and two black bears, Ursus americanus Pallas). In addition, the cardiac activity of three black bears was studied during whole body hypothermia. The resting heart rates obtained during winter dormancy from three bears were significantly lower (75-91%) than those obtained during the summer. The physiological activity cycle of the dormant bears did not change appreciably as they continued to show a relatively high heart rate (40 beats/minute) in the morning hours. Body temperatures obtained from one black bear during winter dormancy showed only a 4° C depression. One dormant bear did not urinate for at least three months, and it was not until the third day post-arousal that voiding occurred. The three black bears subjected to whole body hypothermia experienced asystole and cardiac arrest at body temperatures of 16° - 21° C. At the time of cardiac arrest, heart rates as low as 1 beat/minute were recorded, indicating that bears could maintain low hypothermic heart rates.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.65-15
Documents
Less detail

Temperature regulation in the vampire bat Desodus rotundus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298782
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1965
such as food or adequate shelter may often be of greater importance. Certainly with the large variation in homeothermism among the order as a whole, it is not possible to predict whether a given species would be tolerant to a cold climate. The present study examines these problems in the vampire
  1 document  
Author
Lyman, Charles P.
Wimsatt, William A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64.
Date
September 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
946526
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Bats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Metabolism
Body temperature
Abstract
Body temperature and oxygen consumption were measured at various environmental temperatures in a series of captive and wild caught vampire bats, Desmodus rotundus. The response to changes in ambient temperatures was unpredictable and could not be correlated with the age or sex of the animals, their nutritional condition, or the length of their captivity. Body temperature varied greatly, but generally did not fall below 30° C when the ambient temperature was above 25° C. At lower ambient temperatures, some bats increased their metabolism and maintained a high body temperature for varying periods, while others showed little or no increase in metabolic rate, and their body temperatures declined. Below about 20° C body temperature, bats were unable to rewarm themselves without exogenous heat. Calculations indicate that vampires did not drink sufficient blood to maintain a homeothermic condition at the temperatures of temperate zone hibernacula. Bats could tolerate ambient temperatures of 33° C or more for only short periods. It is suggested that Desmodus is limited from spreading northward because of its inferior temperature regulation.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.
Documents
Less detail

The Role of Trust in Sustainable Management of Land, Fish, and Wildlife Populations in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294079
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
and cultural norms greatly influence inherent trust. Within Inuit communities, strong sharing networks (i.e., food, equipment, etc.) require a certain level of trust and acceptance of vulnerability because resources can come and go, and one day that same individual or family may be without supplies
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt JI
Clark D
Lokken N
Lankshear J
Hausner V
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1781887
Keywords
Arctic
Knowledge
Governance
Indigenous
Trust
Wildlife
Land
Sustainability
Management
Natural resources
Nunavut
Churchill
Climate
Alaska
Abstract
Sustainable resource management depends on support from the public and local stakeholders. Fish, wildlife, and land management in remote areas face the challenge of working across vast areas, often with limited resources, to monitor land use or the status of the fish-and-wildlife populations. Resource managers depend on local residents, often Indigenous, to gain information about environmental changes and harvest trends. Developing mutual trust is thus important for the transfer of knowledge and sustainable use of land resources. We interviewed residents of eight communities in Arctic Alaska and Canada and analyzed their trust in resource governance organizations using mixed-methods. Trust was much greater among Alaska (72%) and Nunavut (62%) residents than Churchill (23%). Trust was highest for organizations that dealt with fish and wildlife issues, had no legal enforcement rights, and were associated with Indigenous peoples. Local organizations were trusted more than non-local in Alaska and Nunavut, but the opposite was true in Churchill. Association tests and modeling indicated that characteristics of organizations were significantly related to trust, whereas education was among the few individual-level characteristics that mattered for trust. Familiarity, communication, and education are crucial to improve, maintain, or foster trust for more effective management of natural resources in such remote communities.
Documents
Less detail

Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294080
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
amount and share it with other community members (Wolfe and Walker 1987). These high-harvesting households are extremely important for food security and for preserving local knowledge. There is earlier data about high-harvesters only for Akutan; the number of households harvesting 70% of the
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt J
Marchioni M
Berman M
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1155017
Keywords
Alaska
Atka
Akutan
Nikolski
Subsistence
Environmental change
Abstract
Our surroundings and society are both constantly evolving. Some changes are due to natural processes. People are responsible for other changes, because of what we do—for example, increasing the size of the population, expanding technology, and increasing mobility and connectivity. And some changes—like climate change—are due to a combination of natural processes and actions of people. In the Arctic, including the Aleutian Islands, marine and coastal ecosystems have seen the largest number of regime shifts with direct and indirect consequences for subsistence activities, commercial fisheries, and coastal communities (Council 2016). This paper describes current subsistence activities and changes local residents have observed over time in three Aleutian Island communities—Akutan, Nikolski, and Atka. As described more later, we did initial household surveys in 2016 and a second round in 2017, as well as more detailed interviews with some residents.
Documents

2018_04-AdaptingToEnviroSocialChange.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Responses of cold- and warm-adapted dogs to infused noradrenalin and acute body cooling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298777
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-21. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
February 1965
cold lost approximately 8% of their body weight dur- ing 40 days of cold exposure, while the animals in the warm room lost only 4% of their weight. Food consumption of the dogs exposed to cold was approximately 54 gm/kg/day, w·hich was 30% higher than both the initial food consumption of this group
  1 document  
Author
Nagasaka, Tetsuo
Carlson, Loren D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-21. 10 p.
Date
February 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
906396
Keywords
Animals
Dogs
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temperature
Oxygen consumption
Heart rate
Shivering
Noradrenalin
Adaptation
Acute body cooling
Thermogenesis
Calorigenic
Abstract
A total of 12 experiments was done in cold-adapted (C-A) and warm-adapted (W -A) beagle dogs, kept more than 40 days at -10° C and 28° C, respectively. The animals, anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg), were paralyzed with Flaxedil (5 mg/kg/hour) and mechanically ventilated at 28-30° C. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and colonic, pinna and paw skin temperatures were measured continuously. The dogs were infused with noradrenalin (1.25 µg/kg/min) for 20 minutes at 30° C and after 45 minutes of acute cold exposure to 5° C. At 28-30° C, basal O2 consumption was higher in C-A dogs. Oxygen consumption of C-A dogs increased with a slight', increase in the heart rate during the initial 18-20 minutes after body cooling and then decreased. In W-A dogs, O2 consumption decreased continuously after acute cold exposure. Calorigenic effects of infused noradrenalin were consistent in C-A and W-A dogs at 30° and 5° C, but there was no difference between the increased amount of O2 consumption from the initial levels in both groups. Noradrenalin caused an increase of the heart rate in W-A dogs at 30° and 5° C, with decrease or no change in C-A dogs. Colonic, pinna and paw skin temperatures were significantly higher in C-A than in W-A dogs. Noradrenalin caused an increase in the temperatures, but the effect of the drug was more prominent in W-A than in C-A animals at lower temperature. These results suggest that the mechanism of nonshivering heat production is well developed by cold acclimation in dogs, and that the increase of this mechanism is due rather to the increase of noradrenalin content in blood than to increased sensitivity of the animals to the calorigenic effects of noradrenalin.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-21
Documents
Less detail

Status of Alaska Natives report 2004: Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294134
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2004
Households [PCT97] Social Security Income In 1999 For Households [PCT98] Supplemental Security Income (SSI) In 1999 For Households [PCT99] Public Assistance Income In 1999 For Households [PCT100] Retirement Income In 1999 For Households [PCT101] Other Types Of Income In 1999 For Households
  1 document  
Author
Goldsmith S
Angvik J
Howe L
Hill A
Leask L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
May 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
22028566
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Economic conditions
Statistics
Eskimos
Aleuts
Social Conditions
Rural conditions
Notes
UAA - ALASKA E98.E2S82 2004 Volume 1. [Main report] -- Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone -- Volume 3. 2000 Census data by ANCSA regions: Alaska Native or American Indian alone or in combination with another race.
Prepared for the Alaska Federation of Natives.
Additional support provided by Understanding Alaska.
Documents

StatusAKNativesRpt2004v2.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail
Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
January 2011
)  Income distributionIncome distribution  HousingHousing  EducationEducation  Social safety netsSocial safety nets  EnvironmentEnvironment  AddictionsAddictions  Health care servicesHealth care services  Food security and Food security and NutritionNutrition
  1 document  
Author
Alvarez, Gonzalo G
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor of Medicine,
Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Date
January 2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3162116
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inuit
Pulmonary
Health
Research
Cancer
Statistics
Tuberculosis
Health Care Access
Documents

Alvarez-Inuit-pulmonary-health-Jan--2011.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and Inuit Nutrition Security in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294373
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 Sep; 15(3):590-607
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Tiff-Annie Kenny
Myriam Fillion
Sarah Simpkin
Sonia D Wesche
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 Sep; 15(3):590-607
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) has been fundamental to the diet and culture of Arctic Indigenous Peoples for thousands of years. Although caribou populations observe natural cycles of abundance and scarcity, several caribou herds across the Circumpolar North have experienced dramatic declines in recent decades due to a range of interrelated factors. Broadly, the objectives of this study are to examine food and nutrition security in relation to wildlife population and management status across Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland, consisting of four regions across the Canadian Arctic). Specifically, we: (1) characterize the contribution of caribou to Inuit nutrition across northern Canada and (2) evaluate the population and management status of caribou herds/populations harvested by Inuit. Dietary data were derived from the 2007-2008 Inuit Health Survey, which included dietary information for Inuit adults (n?=?2097) residing in thirty-six communities, spanning three regions (the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, and Nunatsiavut) of the Canadian North. Published information regarding the range, abundance, status, and management status of caribou herds/populations was collected through document analysis and was validated through consultation with northern wildlife experts (territorial governments, co-management, and/or Inuit organizations). While caribou contributed modestly to total diet energy (3-11% of intake) across the regions, it was the primary source of iron (14-37%), zinc (18-41%), copper (12-39%), riboflavin (15-39%), and vitamin B12 (27-52%), as well as a top source of protein (13-35%). Restrictions on Inuit subsistence harvest (harvest quotas or bans) are currently enacted on at least six northern caribou herds/populations with potential consequences for country food access for over twenty-five Inuit communities across Canada. A holistic multi-sectorial approach is needed to ensure the sustainability of wildlife populations, while supporting Inuit food and nutrition security in the interim.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 11;325(5946):1355-8 PMID 19745143
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61 PMID 21560272
Cites: Ambio. 2004 Dec;33(8):482-6 PMID 15666677
Cites: Sci Adv. 2018 Feb 28;4(2):e1701611 PMID 29503864
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53 PMID 15173410
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):349-62 PMID 19024804
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):1110-4 PMID 17374689
Cites: Ecohealth. 2009 Jun;6(2):266-78 PMID 19953294
Cites: Science. 2010 May 28;328(5982):1164-8 PMID 20430971
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31 PMID 17319086
Cites: Environ Manage. 2012 Dec;50(6):1047-56 PMID 22961618
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Sep;66(4):308-19 PMID 18018844
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):511-9 PMID 22152598
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1989 May;89(5):671-6 PMID 2723291
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Dec 6;108(49):19653-6 PMID 22106297
Cites: Ecol Food Nutr. 2016;55(1):30-49 PMID 26595315
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 Oct;136(10):2594-9 PMID 16988132
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Aug 08;73:25091 PMID 25147772
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jul 05;75:31127 PMID 27388896
Cites: Food Nutr Bull. 2011 Mar;32(1 Suppl):S41-50 PMID 21717917
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:null PMID 23166895
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1370 PMID 20568912
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7 PMID 22323760
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):95-7 PMID 18457280
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2010 Sep 27;365(1554):2913-26 PMID 20713393
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40 PMID 17131971
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-53 PMID 21753059
Cites: Science. 2004 Nov 12;306(5699):1180-3 PMID 15539602
Cites: Ecohealth. 2010 Sep;7(3):361-73 PMID 20680394
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2018 May;21(7):1319-1331 PMID 29331158
Cites: Nature. 2004 Jan 8;427(6970):145-8 PMID 14712274
PubMed ID
30116999 View in PubMed
Less detail

Placemat information: First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294475
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB).
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
healthy behaviours and supportive environments in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, food security, chronic disease prevention, management and screening, and injury prevention policy. Key activities supporting program-delivery include: chronic disease prevention and management, injury
  1 document  
Source
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB).
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
250624
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Medical transportation
Medical care
Health coverage
Health services
Health agencies
Documents

1Claxdalandakapewhandout1.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
environmental security of the Alas- k a n I n u i t c o a s t l i n e d e p e n d e d “ u p o n t h e s t r e n g t h o f ( s e l f ) government in Canada and Greenland”, and only when we all have our own home rule governments, “will we be able to really trust any offshore operation in the Beaufort
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3181838
Keywords
Canada
Inuit
Environment
Wildlife & harvesting
Research & health activities
Human Rights
Documents

06-07_annual_report_lenglish.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Population-specific HIV/AIDS status report: Aboriginal Peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294483
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
  1 document  
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2387719
Keywords
HIV
AIDS
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Demographic profiles
Documents
Less detail

Indigenous Peoples' food systems: the many dimensions of culture, diversity and environment for nutrition and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294487
Source
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment. 339 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
, Andhra Pradesh, India Buduru Salomeyesudas and Periyapatna V. Satheesh 209 Chapter 10 The Bhil food system: links to food security, nutrition and health Lalita Bhattacharjee, Gopa Kothari, Vidya Priya and Biplap K. Nandi 231 Chapter 11 The Maasai food system and food and nutrition security Shadrack
  1 document  
Author
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Erasmus, Bill
Spigelski, Dina
Source
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment. 339 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
9714794
Notes
ISBN: 978-92-5-106071-1
From back cover : Food systems of Indigenous Peoples who retain connection to long-evolved cultures and patterns of living in local ecosystems present a treasure of knowledge that contributes to well-being and health, and can benefit all humankind. This book seeks to define and describe the diversity in food system use, nutrition and health in 12 rural case studies of Indigenous Peoples in different parts of the world as a window to global Indigenous Peoples’ circumstances. A procedure for documenting Indigenous Peoples’ food systems was developed by researchers working with the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (CINE) at McGill University, Canada, and the FAO. The procedure was adapted and applied in case studies located in Canada, Japan, Peru, India, Nigeria, Colombia, Thailand, Kenya, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The collective intent of this documentation is to show the inherent strengths of the local traditional food systems, how people think about and use these foods, the influx of industrial and purchased food, and the circumstances of the nutrition transition in indigenous communities. This research was completed with both qualitative and quantitative methods by Indigenous Peoples and their academic partners in the context of the second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, and the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted in 2007 by the General Assembly of the United Nations.
Documents
Less detail

Breaking down colonial borders in Inuit Nunaat through education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294489
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
May 2017
Western food they were provided at Eklutna, so she fought to have Native food once a week for the students. She helped greatly to alleviate students’ homesickness (Blackman 1989, 100-104). Brower Neakok then went on to study at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where she trained for two
  1 document  
Author
Rudolph, Angela Nuliayok
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Date
May 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
5410017
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Tradition learning
History
Canada
Nunavut
Alaska
Documents

Angela-Nuliayok-Rudolph_Breacking-Down-Colonial-Borders.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Contagious Ecthyma, Rangiferine Brucellosis, and Lungworm Infection in a Muskox ( Ovibos moschatus ) from the Canadian Arctic, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273663
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jun 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2016
Author
Matilde Tomaselli
Chimoné Dalton
Pádraig J Duignan
Susan Kutz
Frank van der Meer
Pratap Kafle
Om Surujballi
Claude Turcotte
Sylvia Checkley
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jun 10;
Date
Jun-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
An adult male muskox ( Ovibos moschatus ), harvested on 26 August 2014 on Victoria Island, Nunavut, in the Canadian Arctic, had proliferative dermatitis on the muzzle and fetlocks suggestive of contagious ecthyma or orf (Parapoxvirus). Histopathologic features of the lesions were consistent with this diagnosis. Orf virus DNA, phylogenetically similar to an isolate from a captive muskox of the Minnesota Zoo, US, was detected in the lesions by PCR using Parapoxvirus primers. Additionally, there was a metaphyseal abscess with a cortical fistula in the right metacarpus from which Brucella suis biovar 4 was isolated and identification supported by PCR. Brucella spp. antibodies were detected in serum. Finally, 212 nodules were dissected from the lungs. Fecal analysis and lung examination demonstrated co-infection with the lungworms Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis and Varestrongylus eleguneniensis. The zoonotic potential of orf and rangiferine brucellosis adds an important public health dimension to this case, particularly given that muskoxen are a valuable source of food for Arctic residents. Careful examination of these pathogens at a population level is needed as they may contribute to muskox population decline and potentially constitute a driver of food insecurity for local communities. This case underscores the importance of wildlife health surveillance as a management tool to conserve wildlife populations and maintain food security in subsistence-oriented communities.
PubMed ID
27285415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving best practice in long term care for Alaska Native and American Indian elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273782
Date
Sept-2005
a distant nursing or assisted living home. In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. Distances between villages and the high cost of food and supplies contribute to the challenges. Most elders desire
  1 document  
Author
Branch, PK
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sept-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
American Indian
Home care
Long Term Care
Service models
Abstract
In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. There are, however, an increasing number of tribally operated programs in Alaska with a focus on Alaska Native values and traditions that are assisting families in keeping their loved ones close to home. These programs are the tribal health system's emerging best practices.
Documents

yr2_1best-practices.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Long term care needs of Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273784
Date
Aug-2005
  1 document  
Author
Branch, K
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Assisted living
Elders
Health status
Home care
Long Term Care
Nursing Homes
Abstract
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) received funding from the Indian Health Service to assess the health status and long term care needs of Alaska's Native elders. The project approaches the needs from a systems and service delivery perspective. The objectives are to determine what services are needed, what services are currently available, and where and how the system can develop services for elders that are culturally appropriate and close to home. This report includes a description of long term care services, estimates of current and future numbers of elders needing services, and recommendations for service development in each region of the state.
Documents
Less detail

Boarding school project: Mental health outcome

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273785
Date
Jul-2007
. Socioeconomic disadvantage causes fatigue, irritability, and illnesses, and jeopardizes security and well-being. Over time, social inequalities can lead to an obstruction of intellectual development in individuals despite the complete lack of an organic learning deficit. Trauma generated by assaults to
  1 document  
Author
Graves, K
Shavings, L
Rose, C
Saylor, A
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska Native
Boarding schools
Historical trauma
Abstract
The boarding school era is an unclear and tentative time in history for many Alaskans. This era has come to the forefront while the Alaska state legislators work toward reinstating regional schools. The purpose of this timely research project was to listen to the voices of Alaska Natives who attended boarding school thirty years ago in order to learn more about this obscure period. Researchers for this study performed a secondary analysis on data originally collected in 2005, focusing on different perspectives than the original researchers. Our team was made up of Alaska Natives trained in psychology and social work and involved in healing activities. In particular, researchers spotlighted resiliency factors of students attended boarding schools and attempted to gain a deeper understanding of the mental-health impacts of the boarding school experience and the intergenerational long-term effects. The project team wanted to honor those who openly revealed themselves and their experiences.
Documents

other_boarding-school-project.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
 ____  How Much is Your Rent or House payment: Less than $300 ____ $300 to $400 ____  $400 to $500 ____ $500 to $600 ____ $600 to $700 ____ More than $700 ____  Do you have medical insurance? ____  If yes, what type? __________  Are you currently receiving any type of financial assistance?  Social Security
  1 document  
Author
Mt. Sanford Tribal Consortium
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Abstract
The purpose of the survey is to help us develop services that will assist Elders to live comfortably in their community.
Notes
Survey instrument
Documents

ltc_elder-needs_survey-instrument.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

585 records – page 2 of 30.