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Assessment of the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287905
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
wider range of agricultural crops, resulting in increased food security in some areas. Warmer winter temperatures might also lead to fewer injuries and fatalities related to cold temperatures. Big Picture Overview What is already known about this topic? Alaska is experiencing
  1 document  
Author
Yoder, Sarah
Author Affiliation
Alaska Section of Epidemiology
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea levels
Permafrost
Glaciers
Weather patterns
Sea ice
Temperature
Subsistence
Infectious disease
Sanitation
Health services
Abstract
Background: Over the past century, the air and water temperatures in Alaska have warmed considerably faster than in the rest of the United States. Because Alaska is the only Arctic state in the Nation, Alaskans are likely to face some climate change challenges that will be different than those encountered in other states. For example, permafrost currently underlies 80% of Alaska and provides a stable foundation for the physical infrastructure of many Alaska communities. As has already been seen in numerous villages, the groundcover that overlies permafrost is vulnerable to sinking or caving if the permafrost thaws, resulting in costly damage to physical infrastructure. The reliance on subsistence resources is another contrast to many other states. Many Alaskans depend upon subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources for food and to support their way of life. Some Alaskans report that the changing environment has already impacted their traditional practices. Many past efforts to characterize the potential impacts of climate change in Alaska have focused primarily on describing expected changes to the physical environment and the ecosystem, and less on describing how these changes, in addition to changes in animal and environmental health, could affect human health. Thus, a careful analysis of how climate change could affect the health of people living in Alaska is warranted. The Alaska Division of Public Health has conducted such an assessment using the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework; the assessment is based on the current National Climate Assessment (NCA) predictions for Alaska. The document is intended to provide a broad overview of the potential adverse human health impacts of climate change in Alaska and to present examples of adaptation strategies for communities to consider when planning their own response efforts. This document does not present a new model for climate change in Alaska, and it does not offer a critique of the NCA predictions for Alaska.
Documents

AssessmentofthePotentialHealthImpactsof.pdf

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Climate change in the Arctic: current and future vulnerability in two Inuit communities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295945
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
the food security of those who do not have the time, money or knowledge to hunt in light of changing exposure. Equipment, such as GPS, radios, and other safety equipment, is shared within the extended family unit and occasionally with friends. In coping with changing climatic conditions, this is
  1 document  
Author
Ford, James D
Smit, Barry
Wandel, Johanna
Allurut, Mishak
Shappa, Kik
Ittusarjuat, Harry
Qrunnut, Kevin
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
343960
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Nunavut
Subsistence
Traditional diet
Vulnerability
Participatory research
Resource management
Abstract
Climate change is already occurring in the Arctic and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment recently concluded that future climate change could be devastating for Inuit. This paper characterises vulnerability to climate change in two Inuit communities in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, focusing on the resource harvesting sector. In both communities, Inuit have demonstrated significant adaptability in the face of current changes in climatic conditions. This adaptability is facilitated by traditional Inuit knowledge, strong social networks, flexibility in resource use, and institutional support. Changing Inuit livelihoods, however, have undermined certain aspects of adaptive capacity and have resulted in emerging vulnerabilities. Global and regional climate projections indicate that climatic conditions which currently pose risks are expected to be negatively affected by future climate change. These projections are not without precedent and analysis of current vulnerability and identification of adaptation constraints by Inuit in the two communities indicate the continued importance of traditional coping mechanisms. The ability to draw on these coping mechanisms in light of future climate change, however, will be unequal and the research indicates that young Inuit and those without access to economic resources, in particular, are vulnerable.
Documents

Climate-change-in-the-Arctic---current-and-future-vulnerability-in-two-Inuit-communities-in-Canada.pdf

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Sustainability and vulnerability: Aboriginal arctic food security in a toxic world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295949
Source
Breaking Ice: Renewable Resource and Ocean Management in the Canadian North : University of Calgary Press : Chapter 3. p 47-69.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
47 CH A PTER 3 SUSTAINABILITY AND VULNERABILITY: ABORIGINAL ARCTIC FOOD SECURITY IN A TOXIC WORLD Shirley Thompson (University of Manitoba) It is not so much that humanity is trying to sustain the natural world, but rather that humanity is trying to sustain itself. The precariousness of
  1 document  
Author
Thompson, Shirley
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Breaking Ice: Renewable Resource and Ocean Management in the Canadian North : University of Calgary Press : Chapter 3. p 47-69.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
834259
Keywords
Food security
Subsistence
Traditional diet
Documents
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Review of Co-management Efforts in Alaska: Report of the Marine Mammal Commission, 6–8 February 2008, Anchorage, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297014
Source
Marine Mammal Commission. vi, 62 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2008
  1 document  
Source
Marine Mammal Commission. vi, 62 p.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
641735
Keywords
Alaska
Marine mammals
Subsistence
Education
Climate change
Documents

Marine-Mammal-Commission-Review-of-Co-Management-Efforts-in-Alaska.pdf

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Climate change in Kivalina, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296263
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
. Sea ice is diminishing, making travel and hunting more difficult and more dangerous. New species of plants, insects, fish, birds, and other wildlife are observed, while successful harvest of endemic species, such as walrus, is less frequent. These changes are influencing food and water security
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7989753
Keywords
Alaska
Kivalina
Climate change
Subsistence
Health web
Sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Kivalina.pdf

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Climate change in Point Hope, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296264
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
Erosion 15 Permafrost 17 Snow and Ice 19 Water and Sanitation 21 Food Safety and Security 25 Conclusion 27 Figures 1. Map of Maniilaq Service Area 4 2. Map of Point Hope Area 5 3. Aerial Photograph of Point Hope Area, Google Earth 6 4. Historic & Projected Temperature, Point Hope, Alaska 8 5
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6285714
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Climate change
Sea level
Health web
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Water sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Point-Hope_0.pdf

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Climate change in Noatak, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296268
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
ailments from wildfire smoke, gastrointestinal infections from waterborne pathogens, chronic diseases in the absence of food security, and damage to critical infrastructure. This report documents climate change impacts as described by the local people and interpreted through the lens of public health
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Bell, Jake
Berner, James
Black, Mike
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
8593504
Keywords
Alaska
Noatak
Climate change
Water sanitation
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Food security
Documents

CCH_AR_062011_Climate-Change-in-Noatak.pdf

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Analysis of a "Mixed Economy" in an Alaskan Native settlement: the case of Arctic Village.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297103
Source
The Canadian Journal of Native Studies XXIII, 1(2003):135-164.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
, regardless of source (wage labor, welfare, food stamps, unemployment benefits, Social Security, the "Per- manent Fund" payments from Alaska's oil revenue), is usually converted into inputs for subsistence economic activity (Fall, 1990:80). There is a great deal of economic rationality to using cash in this
  1 document  
Author
Dinero, Steven C.
Author Affiliation
School of General Studies, Philadelphia University, Pennsylvania USA
Source
The Canadian Journal of Native Studies XXIII, 1(2003):135-164.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1733850
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Village
Hunting
Subsistence
Economy
Abstract
In this paper, I analyze the mixed economy of the Nets'aii Gwich'in settlement of Arctic Village, Alaska. The economic structures of the Gwich'in began to undergo considerable change following Contact by Europeans in the 19th century. Today the Gwich'in possess several modern amenities, and are linked to the global capitalist economy.
Still, data collected in the village in 1999 provide cogent evidence that the priorities and values of the community remain centered upon the hunt and other subsistence activities. Cash income generated through wage labor or transfer payments is merely an additional means to perpetuate this activity. Thus, any assumptions that the Gwich'in are on the verge of abandoning this socioeconomic system for an urban-centric, wage labor-based system are at best, premature.
Documents

cjnsv23no1_pg135-164.pdf

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Petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights seeking relief from violations resulting from global warming caused by acts and omissions of the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297126
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
December 7, 2005
conditions present serious challenges to human health and food security, and possibly even the survival of many cultures.” Noting the particular impact these changes will have on the Inuit, the ACIA states: “For Inuit, warming is likely to disrupt or even destroy their hunting and food sharing culture
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, with collaboration from the Alaska Food Policy Council.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 2014
Growing greens with LED lights in the greenhouse at Chena Hot Springs —Photo © Ken Meter, 2014   Building  Food  Security  in  Alaska     By  Ken  Meter  and  Megan  Phillips  Goldenberg   Crossroads  Resource  Center   Minneapolis     July  28
  1 document  
Author
Meter, Ken
Goldenberg, Megan Phillips
Author Affiliation
Crossroads Resource Center, Minneapolis
Source
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, with collaboration from the Alaska Food Policy Council.
Date
July 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
11978402
Keywords
Alaska
Food security
Subsistence
Hunting
Fishing
Health
Documents
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Toward food security in Canada's north: summary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297087
Source
Canada's Public Policy Forum. 12 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
November 2015
Toward Food Security in Canada’s North NOVEMBER 2015 SUMMARY REPORT ii | TOWARD FOOD SECURiTY iN CANADA’S NORTH TOWARD FOOD SECURiTY iN CANADA’S NORTH | iii The Public Policy Forum is an independent, not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of government in
  1 document  
Source
Canada's Public Policy Forum. 12 p.
Date
November 2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1397354
Keywords
Food insecurity
Subsistence
Hunting
Fishing
Trapping
Pastoralism
Traditional knowledge
Food sustainability
Transportation
Documents

Toward-Food-Security-in-Canadas-North-PPF-report.pdf

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The right to food security in a changing Arctic: the Nunavut Food Security Coalition and the Feeding My Family campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297088
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2013
Case studies: loCal solutions The right to food security in a changing Arctic: the Nunavut Food Security Coalition and the Feeding My Family campaign Overview About 160,000 indigenous Inuit live in four countries across the Arctic — Canada, Greenland, United States (Alaska) and Russia
  1 document  
Author
Papatsie, Lessee
Ellsworth, Leanna
Meakin, Stephanie
Kurvits, Tiina
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
401594
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Subsistence
Traditional knowledge
Climate
Documents

DublinConferenceOnHungerNutritionAndClimateJustice_NunavutCaseStudy.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Chukotka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102057
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
and servicemen were having difficulty Social Transition in the North Chukotka Ethnography, Page 10 obtaining walrus tusks, furs and food. As a result of their misfortune, they pressured the governor of Yakutia province, Voevode A. Barnashlev, to send a petition to Moscow with a request to
  1 document  
Author
Pika, AI
Terentyeva, LP
Bogoyavlensky, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Christianity
Chukchis
Chukotka
Economy
Eskimos
Ethnography
Ethnohistory
Fur breeding
Geography
Health care
Hunting
Indigenous populations
Kinship
Marriage
Reindeer breeding
Sea mammal harvest
Social organization
Subsistence
Traditional culture
Whaling
Abstract
The Providenski district (covering 26.8 thousand square kilometers) occupies the southeastern portion of the Chukotski Peninsula. The southeastern coast of the district is surrounded by the Bering Sea, while the northeast boundary borders the Chukotka district and the western edge neighbors the Yiultinsky district. Prior to 1957, the Providenski district was incorporated into the Chukotka district.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 4_Ethnographic Summary_Chukotka Region_May 1993.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Kamchatka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102058
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Communities 66 V.A. Indexes of Birthrate. Mortality Rates and Population Growth . . . . . . . . 68 V.B. Social Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 V.C. The Demography of the Indigenous Population of Karaga . . . . . . . . . . . 77
  1 document  
Author
Mourashko, OA
Pika, AI
Bogoyavlenski, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Bering Sea
Communication
Demographic behavior
Economy
Ethnic composition
Evens
Fish harvests
Indigenous populations
Itelmens
Kamchadals
Kamchatka Peninsula
Mortality
Orthodox Church
Reindeer
Settlement
Shamanism
Social structure
Subsistence
Traditional use
Abstract
The Kamchatka Administrative Region is made up of the Tigilsky, Karaginsky, and Bystrinsky districts. These districts share common boundaries, which extend from latitude 55°45' to 60°45'north to longitude 153°45' to 165° east. Together, they cover 108,300 square kilometers, with the Tigilsky District spreading out over 68,200 square kilometers, the Karaginsky District spanning 29,500 square kilometers, and the Bystrinsky District occupying 20,600 square kilometers. From south to north, the boundaries between the districts are divided by the Sredinny Mountain Ridge. This ridge descends towards the isthmus of the Kamchatka Peninsula and becomes a watershed (made by rivers flowing into the Okhotsky and Bering seas). Between the Tigilsky and Bystrinsky districts, there is the Ichinsky volcano (3,621 meters), which is extinct. To the west of the Sredinny Ridge lies the West Kamchatka Lowland. This lowland makes up a major part of the Tigilsky District; but because it is so badly bogged it keeps the development of land traffic and communications in the Tigilsky District greatly hindered. It is only in the coastal area that there are still old pathways linking separate villages, and trails which lead up to the passes over the Sredinny Ridge. The northern part of the Tigilsky District and the entire Karaginsky District are located in the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Farther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustaya rivers meet, is Parapolsky Dol.the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Fuirther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustay rivers meet, is Parapoolsky Dol.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 5_Ethnographic Summary_Kamchatka Region_Aug 1993.pdf

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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
land, waters and wildlife, as well as public health. This presentation provides an overview of climate—health connections and describes activities that can help Southwest Alaska communities to assess how climate change may impact disease, rates of injury, food security, water security, and critical
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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Climate change in Pilot Point, Alaska: strategies for community healht

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294104
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Center, Center for Climate and Health.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
September 2013
rate, and consequentially, vulnerability to flooding is increasing. Identified health concerns include food security, damage to health-critical infrastructure, injury and behavioral health issues related to extreme and unusual weather conditions. The process for these health assessments began with
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Flensburg, Susan
Shanigan, Nikki
Skarada, Jennifer
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Center, Center for Climate and Health.
Date
September 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
6152241
Keywords
Alaska
Temperature
Precipitation
Storms
Erosion
Landscape
Wildlife
Subsistence
Notes
This report documents climate change impacts and potential impacts as described by the local people and interpreted through the lens of public health. It is the sixth report in a series describing climate change across Alaska, and the first report to focus on the Bristol Bay Region.
Documents

CCH_AR_092013_Climate-Change-in-PilotPoint.pdf

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Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294080
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
amount and share it with other community members (Wolfe and Walker 1987). These high-harvesting households are extremely important for food security and for preserving local knowledge. There is earlier data about high-harvesters only for Akutan; the number of households harvesting 70% of the
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt J
Marchioni M
Berman M
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1155017
Keywords
Alaska
Atka
Akutan
Nikolski
Subsistence
Environmental change
Abstract
Our surroundings and society are both constantly evolving. Some changes are due to natural processes. People are responsible for other changes, because of what we do—for example, increasing the size of the population, expanding technology, and increasing mobility and connectivity. And some changes—like climate change—are due to a combination of natural processes and actions of people. In the Arctic, including the Aleutian Islands, marine and coastal ecosystems have seen the largest number of regime shifts with direct and indirect consequences for subsistence activities, commercial fisheries, and coastal communities (Council 2016). This paper describes current subsistence activities and changes local residents have observed over time in three Aleutian Island communities—Akutan, Nikolski, and Atka. As described more later, we did initial household surveys in 2016 and a second round in 2017, as well as more detailed interviews with some residents.
Documents

2018_04-AdaptingToEnviroSocialChange.pdf

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17 records – page 1 of 1.