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Food insufficiency is associated with psychiatric morbidity in a nationally representative study of mental illness among food insecure Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257037
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 May;48(5):795-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Katherine A Muldoon
Putu K Duff
Sarah Fielden
Aranka Anema
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. kmuldoon@alumni.ubc.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 May;48(5):795-803
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Food Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies suggest that people who are food insecure are more likely to experience mental illness. However, little is known about which aspects of food insecurity place individuals most at risk of mental illness. The purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of mental illness among food insecure Canadians, and examine whether mental illness differs between those who are consuming insufficient amounts of food versus poor quality foods.
This analysis utilized the publically available dataset from the Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 4.1. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine the associations between food insecurity and mental health disorder diagnosis, while adjusting for potential confounders. Stratified analyses were used to identify vulnerable sub-groups.
Among 5,588 Canadian adults (18-64 years) reporting food insecurity, 58 % reported poor food quality and 42 % reported food insufficiency. The prevalence of mental health diagnosis was 24 % among participants with poor food quality, and 35 % among individuals who were food insufficient (hunger). After adjusting for confounders, adults experiencing food insufficiency had 1.69 adjusted-odds [95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.49-1.91] of having a mental health diagnosis. Stratified analyses revealed increased odds among women (a-OR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.62-2.20), single parent households (a-OR 2.05, 95 % CI 1.51-2.78), and non-immigrants (a-OR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.64-2.16).
The prevalence of mental illness is alarmingly high in this population-based sample of food insecure Canadians. These findings suggest that government and community-based programming aimed at strengthening food security should integrate supports for mental illness in this population.
PubMed ID
23064395 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies in households and other stakeholders viewpoints on the food security experience: a gap to address.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150004
Source
Health Educ Res. 2010 Jun;25(3):401-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Céline Mercier
Annie Bédard
Author Affiliation
1Department of Food Sciences.utrition, Pavillon Paul-Comtois, Université Laval, 2425 rue de l'Agriculture, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6. anne-marie.hamelin@fsaa.ulaval.ca
Source
Health Educ Res. 2010 Jun;25(3):401-12
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Networks - standards
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Food Supply - standards
Humans
Hunger
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - standards
Perception
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper reports results from a case study on household food insecurity needs and the interventions that address them. It aimed at comparing households' perceptions on food insecurity experience and vulnerability to those of other stakeholders: community workers, programme managers and representatives from donor agencies. Semi-structured interviews with 55 households and 59 other stakeholders were conducted. Content analysis was performed, using a framework encompassing food sufficiency, characterization of household food insecurity and vulnerability of households to food insecurity. Overall, the results draw attention to a gap between households and the other stakeholders, where the later do not seem always able to assess the realities of food-insecure households. Other areas of divergences include: characteristics of food insecurity, relative importance of various risk factors related to food insecurity and the effectiveness of the community assistance to enhance the households' ability to face food insecurity. These divergent perceptions may jeopardize the implementation of sustainable solutions to food insecurity. Training of stakeholders for a better assessment of households' experience and needs, and systematic evaluation of interventions, appear urgent and highly relevant for an adequate response to households' needs. Collaboration between all stakeholders should lead to knowledge sharing and advocacy for policies dedicated to poverty reduction.
PubMed ID
19564176 View in PubMed
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