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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298121
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
a Department of Biology & Wildlife , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Food
Food Supply
Humans
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. The pillars of food security include food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, the pillars may focus on traditional foods.
To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska.
Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: “traditional foods”, “food security”, “access”, “availability”, “utilisation”, “Alaska”, “Alaska Native” and “indigenous”.
Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents met the inclusion criteria. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8).
Studies that estimate the prevalence of traditional food insecurity in Alaska are virtually absent from the literature. Instead most studies provide a review of factors related to food security. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Apr 22;85(7):19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-1997
Author
E. Gjelsvik
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Apr 22;85(7):19
Date
Apr-22-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developing Countries
Food Supply
Humans
Norway
Poverty
Social Security
PubMed ID
9464130 View in PubMed
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Women's dietary intakes in the context of household food insecurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202843
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Mar;129(3):672-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
V S Tarasuk
G H Beaton
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Mar;129(3):672-9
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Services
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Iron - administration & dosage
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Women's health
Abstract
A study of food insecurity and nutritional adequacy was conducted with a sample of 153 women in families receiving emergency food assistance in Toronto, Canada. Contemporaneous data on dietary intake and household food security over the past 30 d were available for 145 of the women. Analyses of these data revealed that women who reported hunger in their households during the past 30 d also reported systematically lower intakes of energy and a number of nutrients. The effect of household-level hunger on intake persisted even when other economic, socio-cultural, and behavioral influences on reported dietary intake were considered. Estimated prevalences of inadequacy in excess of 15% were noted for Vitamin A, folate, iron, and magnesium in this sample, suggesting that the low levels of intake associated with severe household food insecurity are in a range that could put women at risk of nutrient deficiencies.
PubMed ID
10082773 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity: consequences for the household and broader social implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203007
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):525S-528S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A M Hamelin
J P Habicht
M. Beaudry
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences des aliments et de nutrition, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):525S-528S
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Hunger
Male
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Social Alienation
Social Values
Stress, Psychological
Urban Population
Abstract
A conceptual framework showing the household and social implications of food insecurity was elicited from a qualitative and quantitative study of 98 households from a heterogeneous low income population of Quebec city and rural surroundings; the study was designed to increase understanding of the experience of food insecurity in order to contribute to its prevention. According to the respondents' description, the experience of food insecurity is characterized by two categories of manifestations, i.e., the core characteristics of the phenomenon and a related set of actions and reactions by the household. This second category of manifestations is considered here as a first level of consequences of food insecurity. These consequences at the household level often interact with the larger environment to which the household belongs. On a chronic basis, the resulting interactions have certain implications that are tentatively labeled "social implications" in this paper. Their examination suggests that important aspects of human development depend on food security. It also raises questions concerning the nature of socially acceptable practices of food acquisition and food management, and how such acceptability can be assessed. Guidelines to that effect are proposed. Findings underline the relevance and urgency of working toward the realization of the right to food.
PubMed ID
10064323 View in PubMed
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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
coastal communi- ties scattered across approxi- mately 31% of the country’s landmass (Figure 1), numerous health implications from climate change have already been docu- mented, including the effects on personal safety, food and water security, and mental health.6 Changing temperature and pre- cipitation
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
924997
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Dawna Royall
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Poverty
PubMed ID
15780149 View in PubMed
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The social construction of anemia in school shelters for indigenous children in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170413
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Bernardo Turnbull
Gloria Martínez-Andrade
Miguel Klünder
Tania Carranco
Ximena Duque-López
Rosa Isela Ramos-Hernández
Marco González-Unzaga
Sergio Flores-Hernández
Homero Martínez-Salgado
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Nutricional (UIEN), Instituto Méxicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), México D.F., México.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):503-16
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cultural Characteristics
Diet
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Malnutrition - epidemiology
Mexico - epidemiology
Poverty Areas
Schools - organization & administration
Abstract
Indigenous children in school shelters in Mexico suffer from anemia in spite of food that is subsidized, prepared, and served to them. Economically and biomedically centered strategies to reduce anemia have achieved only partial and short-term success. An interdisciplinary team investigated the food security system of the school shelters and collected data through interviews and participant observation. The analysis revealed that the children's nutrition depends on a frail chain of events in which a single link's failure can lead to nutritional insecurity. The authors conclude that the social actors involved in the process are mainly considering the economic aspects of nutrition, but anemia persists as a social construction of the faulty relationship between the institution that runs the shelters and the indigenous culture. The authors make suggestions for an intervention that empowers the community by involving it actively in solving the problem.
Notes
Comment In: Qual Health Res. 2006 Dec;16(10):1315-617079795
PubMed ID
16513993 View in PubMed
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Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165008
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Hing Man Chan
Karen Fediuk
Sue Hamilton
Laura Rostas
Amy Caughey
Harriet Kuhnlein
Grace Egeland
Eric Loring
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Canada. lchan@unbc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The food supply of Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada, is characterized by market food of relatively low nutritional value and nutrient-dense traditional food. The objective of this study is to assess community perceptions about the availability and accessibility of traditional and market foods in Nunavut.
A qualitative study using focus group methodology.
Focus groups were conducted in 6 communities in Nunavut in 2004 and collected information was analyzed.
Barriers to increased traditional food consumption included high costs of hunting and changes in lifestyle and cultural practices. Participants suggested that food security could be gained through increased economic support for local community hunts, freezers and education programs, as well as better access to cheaper and higher quality market food.
Interventions to improve the dietary quality of Nunavut residents are discussed.
PubMed ID
17319086 View in PubMed
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Animistic pragmatism and native ways of knowing: adaptive strategies for overcoming the struggle for food in the sub-Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107659
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
environmental challenges like food security. Results. Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition,1 for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. Th ey are human "supercomputers," historical
  1 document  
Author
Raymond Anthony
Author Affiliation
Department of Philosophy, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Environment
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Philosophy
Abstract
Subsistence norms are part of the "ecosophy" or ecological philosophy of Alaska Native Peoples in the sub-Arctic, such as the Inupiat of Seward Peninsula. This kind of animistic pragmatism is a special source of practical wisdom that spans over thousands of years and which has been instrumental in the Iñupiat's struggle to survive and thrive in harsh and evolving environments.
I hope to show how narrative in relationship to the "ecosophy" of Alaska Native peoples can help to promote a more ecological orientation to address food insecurity in rural communities in Alaska. Alaska Native ecosophy recommends central values and virtues necessary to help address concerns in Alaska's rural communities.
Here, I will tease out the nature of this "ecosophy" in terms of animistic pragmatism and then show why this form of pragmatism can be instrumental for problematizing multi-scalar, intergenerational, uncertain and complex environmental challenges like food security.
Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition, for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. They are human "supercomputers," historical epistemologists and moral philosophers of a sort who use narrative, a form of moral testimony, to help their communities face challenges and seize opportunities in the wake of an ever-changing landscape.
The "ecosophy" of the Iñupiat of Seward Peninsula offers examples of "focal practices", which are essential for environmental education. These focal practices instil key virtues, namely humility, gratitude, self-reliance, attentiveness, responsibility and responsiveness, that are necessary for subsistence living.
Notes
Cites: J Med Philos. 1996 Jun;21(3):303-208803811
PubMed ID
23986900 View in PubMed
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How are your berries? Perspectives of Alaska's environmental managers on trends in wild berry abundance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279661
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jerry Hupp
Michael Brubaker
Kira Wilkinson
Jennifer Williamson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Rural Population
Abstract
Wild berries are a valued traditional food in Alaska. Phytochemicals in wild berries may contribute to the prevention of vascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline, making berry consumption important to community health in rural areas. Little was known regarding which species of berries were important to Alaskan communities, the number of species typically picked in communities and whether recent environmental change has affected berry abundance or quality.
To identify species of wild berries that were consumed by people in different ecological regions of Alaska and to determine if perceived berry abundance was changing for some species or in some regions.
We asked tribal environmental managers throughout Alaska for their views on which among 12 types of wild berries were important to their communities and whether berry harvests over the past decade were different than in previous years. We received responses from 96 individuals in 73 communities.
Berries that were considered very important to communities differed among ecological regions of Alaska. Low-bush blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum and V. caespitosum), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) and salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) were most frequently identified as very important berries for communities in the boreal, polar and maritime ecoregions, respectively. For 7 of the 12 berries on the survey, a majority of respondents indicated that in the past decade abundance had either declined or become more variable.
Our study is an example of how environmental managers and participants in local observer networks can report on the status of wild resources in rural Alaska. Their observations suggest that there have been changes in the productivity of some wild berries in the past decade, resulting in greater uncertainty among communities regarding the security of berry harvests. Monitoring and experimental studies are needed to determine how environmental change may affect berry abundance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26380964 View in PubMed
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Food-based approaches to combat the double burden among the poor: challenges in the Asian context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157021
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:111-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Geok Lin Khor
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia. khorgl@medic.upm.edu.my
Source
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:111-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - methods - standards
Asia - epidemiology
Developing Countries
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Malnutrition - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Poverty
Abstract
Estimates of FAO indicate that 14% of the population worldwide or 864 million in 2002-2004 were undernourished in not having enough food to meet basic daily energy needs. Asia has the highest number of undernourished people, with 163 million in East Asia and 300 million in South Asia. Meanwhile obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases continue to escalate in the region. The double burden of malnutrition also affects the poor, which is a serious problem in Asia, as it has the largest number of poor subsisting on less than $1/day. As poverty in the region is predominantly rural, agriculture-based strategies are important for improving household food security and nutritional status. These measures include shifting toward production of high-value products for boosting income, enhancing agricultural biodiversity, increasing consumption of indigenous food plants and biofortified crops. Urban poor faces additional nutritional problems being more sensitive to rising costs of living, lack of space for home and school gardening, and trade-offs between convenience and affordability versus poor diet quality and risk of contamination. Time constraints faced by working couples in food preparation and child care are also important considerations. Combating the double burden among the poor requires a comprehensive approach including adequate public health services, and access to education and employment skills, besides nutrition interventions.
PubMed ID
18296315 View in PubMed
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Complexity of food preparation and food security status in low-income young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131583
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Bernadette Stringer
Ted Haines
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(3):133-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cooking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Poverty
Quebec
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was conducted to explore whether preparing more complex meals was associated with higher food security status.
This mixed-methods, community-based study involved the use of semistructured interviews to examine the cooking practices of a group of young, low-income women in Montreal. Fifty participants aged 18 to 35 were recruited at 10 locations in five low-income neighbourhoods. Food security status was the main outcome measure and the main exposure variable, "complex food preparation," combined the preparation of three specific food types (soups, sauces, and baked goods) using basic ingredients.
Low-income women preparing a variety of meals using basic ingredients at least three times a week were more than twice as likely to be food secure as were women preparing more complex meals less frequently.
Women who prepared more complex meals more frequently had higher food security. Whether this means that preparing more complex foods results in greater food security remains unclear, as this was an exploratory study.
PubMed ID
21896250 View in PubMed
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Community-based health research led by the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):396-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Sonia Wesche
Roseanne C Schuster
Pam Tobin
Cindy Dickson
Darcie Matthiessen
Shel Graupe
Megan Williams
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Sciences, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):396-406
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper documents an exceptional research partnership developed between the Vuntut Gwitchin Government (VGG) in Old Crow, Yukon, with a group of scientists to examine northern food security and health as part of a larger, multidisciplinary International Polar Year (IPY) research program. We focus on the elements that enabled a successful community-researcher relationship. Study design. The VGG led the development of the research and acted as Principal Investigator on the IPY grant. The multidisciplinary collaboration spanned the physical, biological and health sciences, including issues related to food security.
The food security and health component of this research was carried out using a series of complementary methods, including focus groups, structured interviews, a household questionnaire, an interactive workshop, community meetings, transcript analysis and a caribou flesh exposure assessment.
Results from the food security component are informing local and regional adaptation planning. The legacy of the research collaboration includes a number of results-based outputs for a range of stakeholders, a community-based environmental monitoring program, long-term research relationships and improved community capacity.
The type of collaboration described here provides a useful model for new types of participatory health research with northern communities.
PubMed ID
21884655 View in PubMed
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Higher n3-fatty acid status is associated with lower risk of iron depletion among food insecure Canadian Inuit women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115069
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:289
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer A Jamieson
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Hope A Weiler
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada. jjamieso@stfx.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:289
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Iron - blood - deficiency
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
High rates of iron deficiency and anemia are common among Inuit and Arctic women despite a traditional diet based on animal source foods. However, representative data on iron status and relevant determinants for this population are lacking. The objectives were to determine the prevalence of anemia and depletion of iron stores, then to identify correlates of iron status in non-pregnant Canadian Inuit women.
In a cross-sectional survey of 1550 women in the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007-2008, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (on a subset), C-reactive protein (CRP), RBC fatty acid composition, and H pylori serology were analyzed on fasting venous blood. Sociodemographic, food security status, anthropometric, dietary, and health data were collected. Correlates of iron status were assessed with multivariate linear and logistic models.
Anemia was observed in 21.7% and iron deficient erythropoiesis in 3.3% of women. For women with CRP = 10 mg/L (n = 1260) 29.4% had depleted iron stores. Inadequate iron intakes were observed in 16% of premenopausal and
Notes
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PubMed ID
23547888 View in PubMed
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Local observations of climate change and impacts on traditional food security in two northern Aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95657
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Guyot Melissa
Dickson Cindy
Paci Chris
Furgal Chris
Chan Hing Man
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Fresh Water
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Water supply
Weather
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our primary objective was to record participant observations of changes in the local environment, harvesting situations and traditional food species and to explore what impact these may have on traditional food. STUDY DESIGN: A participatory study with 2 northern Aboriginal communities in Canada. METHODS: Focus groups were conducted in both communities. Both specific and open-ended questions were asked, to gather information about the traditional food harvest and a qualitative analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Members from both communities are witnessing variable changes in climate that are affecting their traditional food harvest. New species and changes in migration of species being observed by community members have the potential to affect the consumption of traditional food. Similarly, changes in water levels in and around harvesting areas are affecting access to harvest areas, which in turn affects the traditional food harvest. CONCLUSIONS: Community members have been required to change their harvest mechanisms to adapt to changes in climate and ensure an adequate supply of traditional food. A strong commitment to programs that will ensure the protection of traditional food systems is necessary.
PubMed ID
17319085 View in PubMed
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Workshop 4 (synthesis): securing food production under climate variability--exploring the options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95854
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Björklund G.
Author Affiliation
GeWa Consulting, Marmorvägen 16A, 75244 Uppsala, Sweden. gunilla.bjorklund@telia.com
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bangladesh
Climate
Disasters
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Rivers
Water supply
Abstract
Climate variabilities may result in different types of dry spells, droughts or flood situations, having harmful effects on agricultural productivity and food security. Long-term trends in climate variabilities and climate extremes may be a consequence of an on-going climate change and would thus result in a more permanent change in the pre-conditions for food production. The presentations and discussion during the workshop concentrated on some different measures to be taken in addressing these kind of situations and in particularly on the adverse effects of dry spells, droughts and to some extent also floods. The different areas presented were examples from Bangladesh, the indus river and delta region, examples from India (Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh), Israel, Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan.
PubMed ID
15195431 View in PubMed
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Perceived barriers in accessing food among recent Latin American immigrants in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117569
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2013;12:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mandana Vahabi
Cynthia Damba
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Community Services-Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada. mvahabi@ryerson.ca
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2013;12:1
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In Canada, recent immigrant households experience more food insecurity than the general population, but limited information is available about the personal, cultural, and social factors that contribute to this vulnerability. This study focused on recent Latin American (LA) immigrants to explore their perceived barriers in acquiring safe, nutritious, and culturally-appropriate food.
A cross-sectional mixed-method design was applied to collect information from a convenience sample of 70 adult Spanish/Portuguese speakers who had arrived in Toronto within the last five years. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with primary household caregivers to obtain responses about barriers to acquiring food for their households; data were analyzed using a thematic analysis technique.
Four main categories of barriers were identified: limited financial resources; language difficulty; cultural food preferences; and poor knowledge of available community-based food resources and services. Inadequate income was the main impediment in accessing adequate food, and was related to affordability of food items, accessibility of food outlets and transportation cost, and limited time for grocery shopping due to work conditions. Language barriers affected participants' ability to obtain well-paid employment and their awareness about and access to available community-based food resources. Cultural barriers were related to food preferences and limited access to culturally-appropriate foods and resources.
The main barrier to food security among our sample of LA newcomers to Toronto is limited financial resources, highlighting the need for policies and strategies that could improve their financial power to purchase sufficient, nutritious, and culturally-acceptable food. Linguistic barriers and limited information among newcomers suggest the need to provide linguistically- and culturally-appropriate information related to community-based food programs and resources, as well as accessible subsidized English language programs, in the community and at workplaces. Participatory community-based food programs can augment, in a socially acceptable manner, food resources and reduce the social stigma attached to food charity. Finally, it is crucial to monitor and evaluate existing social and community-based services for their accessibility, cultural appropriateness and diversity, and effectiveness.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23286318 View in PubMed
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