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Food insecurity among Inuit women exacerbated by socioeconomic stresses and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141282
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-201
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maude C Beaumier
James D Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Room 308C Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC H3A 2K6.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-201
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Financing, Personal
Focus Groups
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hunger
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - psychology
Middle Aged
Nunavut - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's health
Abstract
To identify and characterize the determinants of food insecurity among Inuit women.
A community-based study in Igloolik, Nunavut, using semi-structured interviews (n = 36) and focus groups (n = 5) with Inuit women, and key informants interviews with health professionals (n = 13).
There is a high prevalence of food insecurity among Inuit females in Igloolik, with women in the study reporting skipping meals and reducing food intake on a regular basis. Food insecurity is largely transitory in nature and influenced by food affordability and budgeting; food knowledge; education and preferences; food quality and availability; absence of a full-time hunter in the household; cost of harvesting; poverty; and addiction. These determinants are operating in the context of changing livelihoods and climate-related stresses.
Inuit women's food insecurity in Igloolik is the outcome of multiple determinants operating at different spatial-temporal scales. Climate change and external socio-economic stresses are exacerbating difficulties in obtaining sufficient food. Coping strategies currently utilized to manage food insecurity are largely reactive and short-term in nature, and could increase food system vulnerability to future stresses. Intervention by local, territorial and federal governments is required to implement, coordinate and monitor strategies to enhance women's food security, strengthen the food system, and reduce vulnerability to future stressors.
PubMed ID
20737808 View in PubMed
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Sami responses to poverty in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295960
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
parliament ten years before the Norwegian Sami and twenty before the Swedish Sami. The Finnish Sami also receive many of the same political privileges as the Norwegian Sami. Yet in Finland the Sami argue that there are no Sami-specific laws to secure them additional rights through their indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Burmeister Hicks, Christian Jakob
Somby, Ande
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
104698
Keywords
Sami
Poverty
Political history
Culture
Education
Reindeer
Documents

Indigenous-Peoples-and-Poverty---An-International-Perspective.pdf

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Reconciling traditional knowledge, food security, and climate change: experience from Old Crow, YT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104280
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Vasiliki Douglas
Hing Man Chan
Sonia Wesche
Cindy Dickson
Norma Kassi
Lorraine Netro
Megan Williams
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Culture
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preservation - economics - methods
Food Storage - economics - methods
Food Supply - economics - methods
Gardening - education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Transportation - economics - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Because of a lack of transportation infrastructure, Old Crow has the highest food costs and greatest reliance on traditional food species for sustenance of any community in Canada's Yukon Territory. Environmental, cultural, and economic change are driving increased perception of food insecurity in Old Crow.
To address community concerns regarding food security and supply in Old Crow and develop adaptation strategies to ameliorate their impact on the community.
A community adaptation workshop was held on October 13, 2009, in which representatives of different stakeholders in the community discussed a variety of food security issues facing Old Crow and how they could be dealt with. Workshop data were analyzed using keyword, subject, and narrative analysis techniques to determine community priorities in food security and adaptation.
Community concern is high and favored adaptation options include agriculture, improved food storage, and conservation through increased traditional education. These results were presented to the community for review and revision, after which the Vuntut Gwitchin Government will integrate them into its ongoing adaptation planning measures.
PubMed ID
24859099 View in PubMed
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Food security: what the community wants. Learning through focus groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216722
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
D. Hargrove
J A Dewolfe
L. Thompson
Author Affiliation
Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Health Unit, Ontario.
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - methods
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Mental health
Ontario
Public Health Administration
Self Concept
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We used focus groups to learn the range of issues threatening food security of low income residents in our community. Five major themes emerged from the discussions: literacy, money, time, mental health and self-esteem, suggesting several approaches that could help ensure food security: 1) education, 2) sharing of resources, 3) coalition building, and 4) advocacy. Education programs have to be practical, allowing for demonstrations and hands-on learning while emphasizing skill building and problem solving. Incorporating a social aspect into learning may compensate for the social isolation and would capitalize on the impressive mutual support we witnessed. Strategies based on self-help and peer assistance may counteract low self-esteem and overcome suspicion of health professionals. A community-wide effort is needed to address the factors contributing to food insecurity. We envision the formation of a coalition of professionals, agencies, and low income people to develop a comprehensive strategy for achieving food security.
PubMed ID
10139320 View in PubMed
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"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1504-1119144239
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-915622799
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
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Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165008
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Hing Man Chan
Karen Fediuk
Sue Hamilton
Laura Rostas
Amy Caughey
Harriet Kuhnlein
Grace Egeland
Eric Loring
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Canada. lchan@unbc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The food supply of Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada, is characterized by market food of relatively low nutritional value and nutrient-dense traditional food. The objective of this study is to assess community perceptions about the availability and accessibility of traditional and market foods in Nunavut.
A qualitative study using focus group methodology.
Focus groups were conducted in 6 communities in Nunavut in 2004 and collected information was analyzed.
Barriers to increased traditional food consumption included high costs of hunting and changes in lifestyle and cultural practices. Participants suggested that food security could be gained through increased economic support for local community hunts, freezers and education programs, as well as better access to cheaper and higher quality market food.
Interventions to improve the dietary quality of Nunavut residents are discussed.
PubMed ID
17319086 View in PubMed
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Reindeer herding, traditional knowledge and adaptation to climate change and loss of grazing land.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297066
Source
International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry. EALAT Project. 76 p.
Publication Type
Report
Arctic is the home of indigenous peoples like reindeer herders and is now changing rapidly. The ambition of EALÁT and this report is to contribute to increased cooperation between Arctic nation states and indigenous peoples to secure future sustainable development in circumpolar north and maintain a
  1 document  
Author
Magga, Ole Henrik
Mathiesen, Svein D.
Corell, Robert W.
Oskal, Anders
Source
International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry. EALAT Project. 76 p.
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4454253
Keywords
Sami
Reindeer
Traditional knowledge
Climate change
Notes
Partial Table of Contents: Climate impact on reindeer nomadism. Reindeer pasture use and land use change, Reindeer herders' traditional knowledge: codifying herders' adaptive knowledge. Reindeer herders' social and economic adaptation - institutions and governance as constraints and opportunities. Consequences of climate variability and change on reindeer. Welfare of reindeer and herds of reindeer - two ways of knowing. EALAT community based workshops in the Circumpolar North. Outreach of EALAT knowledge: the Reindeer Portal. Teaching, learning and building competence locally in reindeer herder' societies. IPY EALAT legacy. Vulnerability, resilience adaptive capacity in reindeer herders' society.
Documents

Reindeer-herding-traditional-knowledgem-adaptation-to-climate-change-and-loss-of-grazing-land.pdf

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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
annually 8 (BQCMB, 2008). Reduced reindeer and caribou numbers have threatened the food security and well-being of some communities. In Canada, some communities have reduced or eliminated quotes allowing commercial caribou harvests. Traditional language ability is disappearing in some
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

MeisMason_thesis_fulltext.pdf

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Climate change effects on snow conditions and the human rights of reindeer herders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297057
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
, paragraph 2, sentence 2 to be understood as only providing for food security, ICESCR Article 11 would have been superfluous prior to the entry into force of the Optional Protocol to the ICESCR in 2013.83 Unlike the right to food, rights under ICESCR Article 1 and ICCPR Article 1 are said to not be
  1 document  
Author
Kirchner, Stefan
Author Affiliation
University of Lapland
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
307695
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Reindeer herders
Wind energy
Documents

Climate-Change-Effects-on-Snow-Conditions-and-the-Human-Rights-of.pdf

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Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
........................... 11 2.2 The climate of the future – climate projections for 2050–2100 ............. 12 3 Impacts of climate change on nature and society ...................... 16 3.1 The natural environment .............. 16 3.2 Food production ............................. 22 3.3 Human life and health
  1 document  
Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
12235129
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Documents

stm201220130033000engpdfs.pdf

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'Bushcraft' and 'Indigenous Knowledge' transformations of a concept in the modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297019
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
  1 document  
Author
Fenton, Lisa
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
29597515
Keywords
Saami Kuksa
Traditional knowledge
Bushcraft
Sami
Bow-drill
Trapping
Abstract
The relationship between ‘bushcraft’ and ‘indigenous knowledge’ is investigated through a historical review, an examination of ethnographic literature, fieldwork amongst bushcraft practitioners, and through original case studies. Fieldwork was carried out in Sweden, the USA, and the UK. Case studies of the Saami ‘kuksa’, the ‘figure 4’ deadfall trap, and making fire by friction are used to explore a number of themes in the contemporary bushcraft world: the role of skilled-practice, ethical values, notions of an individually experienced connection with nature, practice as a personal transformative experience, and as an intersubjective relationship between practitioner and craft engagement with the material affordances in the landscape. It is argued that motivations for practice foreground a relationship with an environmental experience that counters ‘alienation’ through the development of techniques required to spend un-insulated time in nature which counter modern Western technocratic lifestyles. Bushcraft destabilises apparently similar categories of activity, particularly tourism, outdoor adventure recreation and education, historical reenactment and survivalism.
Documents

207Bushcraft-and-Indigenous-Knowledge--transformations-of-a-concept-in-the-m.pdf

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Food security in older adults: community service provider perceptions of their roles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158582
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(4):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Heather H Keller
John J M Dwyer
Vicki Edwards
Christine Senson
H. Gayle Edward
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON. hkeller@uoguelph.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(4):317-28
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Health Services
Focus Groups
Food
Food Services - organization & administration
Geriatric Assessment
Health education
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Ontario
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
Food insecurity in older adults is influenced by financial constraints, functional disability, and isolation. Twenty-eight social- and community-service providers participated in four focus groups to report (a) perceptions and experiences with food insecurity in their older clients, (b) beliefs about their potential role(s) in promoting food security, and (c) opinions about constraints that influenced these roles. A constant comparison analysis identified key themes. The formal caregivers reported six roles for improving food security: (a) monitoring, (b) coordination, and (c) promoting services, (d) education, (e) advocacy, and (f) providing a social environment. The final theme summarizes these roles as "the need for personalization of service". Social and community service providers are involved in roles that can promote the health of older adults by addressing their food insecurity. Social service providers need to be acknowledged and supported in this health promotion role.
PubMed ID
18304920 View in PubMed
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Community well being and infectious diseases among Alaska Native communities in the Chugach Region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2986
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
sense of community were all fac- tors in staying healthy. Of these, exercise was the means of staying healthy mentioned most often. Participants stated they exercised both through traditional means, such as harvest- ing traditional foods, hunting. and fishing. as well as through modem sports such as
  1 document  
Author
Speier, T.L
Author Affiliation
Alaska Comprehensive and Specialized Evaluation Services (ACSES), University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Psychology, 99508, USA. antls1@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives
Attitude to Health
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infectious diseases
Interviews
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance abuse
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine how Native people of the Chugach Region of Alaska perceive their own communities' health and well being, particularly in regard to infectious diseases. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective focus group interview survey. METHODS: During September to December 1999, 12 focus groups were conducted in seven communities in the Chugach Region of Alaska with 97 participants. Using a set of eight questions, information gathered provided insights into the participants' health-related perceptions and provided previously nonexistent baseline data pertaining toTB and hepatitis. RESULTS: Participants showed a good working knowledge of common infectious diseases. There were misconceptions and a potential for increased knowledge in highly prevalent diseases, but more recently delineated infections in rural Alaska, e.g., respiratory syncvtial virus (RSV), Helicobacter pylori, and less prevalent diseases, e.g., Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The participants expressed a desire for further infectious disease information and dialogue. CONCLUSIONS: This process can be used to develop a risk assessment tool for medical and clinical providers' use in an effort to increase testing for such infectious diseases as HIV, TB, Hepatitis C, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In this case the authors also produced a STD prevention video for rural Alaska Natives, entitled, Summer Sun Winter Moon.
PubMed ID
11768448 View in PubMed
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Community-based health research led by the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):396-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Sonia Wesche
Roseanne C Schuster
Pam Tobin
Cindy Dickson
Darcie Matthiessen
Shel Graupe
Megan Williams
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Sciences, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):396-406
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper documents an exceptional research partnership developed between the Vuntut Gwitchin Government (VGG) in Old Crow, Yukon, with a group of scientists to examine northern food security and health as part of a larger, multidisciplinary International Polar Year (IPY) research program. We focus on the elements that enabled a successful community-researcher relationship. Study design. The VGG led the development of the research and acted as Principal Investigator on the IPY grant. The multidisciplinary collaboration spanned the physical, biological and health sciences, including issues related to food security.
The food security and health component of this research was carried out using a series of complementary methods, including focus groups, structured interviews, a household questionnaire, an interactive workshop, community meetings, transcript analysis and a caribou flesh exposure assessment.
Results from the food security component are informing local and regional adaptation planning. The legacy of the research collaboration includes a number of results-based outputs for a range of stakeholders, a community-based environmental monitoring program, long-term research relationships and improved community capacity.
The type of collaboration described here provides a useful model for new types of participatory health research with northern communities.
PubMed ID
21884655 View in PubMed
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Local observations of climate change and impacts on traditional food security in two northern Aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95657
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Guyot Melissa
Dickson Cindy
Paci Chris
Furgal Chris
Chan Hing Man
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Fresh Water
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Water supply
Weather
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our primary objective was to record participant observations of changes in the local environment, harvesting situations and traditional food species and to explore what impact these may have on traditional food. STUDY DESIGN: A participatory study with 2 northern Aboriginal communities in Canada. METHODS: Focus groups were conducted in both communities. Both specific and open-ended questions were asked, to gather information about the traditional food harvest and a qualitative analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Members from both communities are witnessing variable changes in climate that are affecting their traditional food harvest. New species and changes in migration of species being observed by community members have the potential to affect the consumption of traditional food. Similarly, changes in water levels in and around harvesting areas are affecting access to harvest areas, which in turn affects the traditional food harvest. CONCLUSIONS: Community members have been required to change their harvest mechanisms to adapt to changes in climate and ensure an adequate supply of traditional food. A strong commitment to programs that will ensure the protection of traditional food systems is necessary.
PubMed ID
17319085 View in PubMed
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The Sami of the Kola Peninsula: about the life of an ethnic minority in the Soviet Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296734
Source
Senter for samiske studier, Skriftserie nr. 19. 151 pages.
Publication Type
Journal
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Allemann, Lukas
Source
Senter for samiske studier, Skriftserie nr. 19. 151 pages.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Journal
File Size
2733971
Keywords
Kola Peninsula
Sami
Colonization
Reindeer herding
Education
Social Conditions
Documents

Nr-19-2013-The-Sami-of-the-Kola-Peninsula.pdf

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Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
......................................................................................................... 144 5.3 Military and security in the Arctic .......................................................................... 149 5.3.1 Military presence in the Arctic ........................................................................ 149 5.3.2 Human security
  1 document  
Source
Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2025863
Keywords
Sami
Parliaments
Arctic
Governance
Arctic Council
Fishing
Reindeer herding
Land rights
Mining
Climate change
Abstract
This Master's Thesis discusses two phenomena: the Sami people and the Arctic. The Sami are indigenous populations of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Federation. The Sami are a single people living in the four different countries, where they strive for their non-territorial autonomy. The main channels for their political influence are the Sami Parliaments on the respective nation states, while in Russia have very limited legal means for their political participation and influencing their position. The Arctic is the northernmost part of the World; it is the huge ocean mostly covered with ice, surrounded by land. It is the Sami peoples' homeland. The littoral states, the United States of America, Canada, the Russian Federation, Norway, and Greenland (Denmark) with Iceland, Sweden and Finland formed the Arctic Council have, the main intergovernmental and supranational organization in the Arctic, where major decisions are adopted. The Arctic is rich in natural resources and extractive industries are influencing both the peoples and environment of the Arctic. Global warming rapidly changes the face of the Arctic, while over-exploitation endangers the indigenous peoples and biodiversity.
The first part of the master thesis presents the Sami people, their history, political organization, legal regulation and protection of the Sami people, their everyday lives and the ongoing changes taking place in the Arctic. The second part presents the results of the survey among the Sami people. The survey tackled different set of personal views regarding topics discussed in the thesis.
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Being Sami enough - increasing the Sami stage of performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296747
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Spring 2017
  1 document  
Author
Hernes, Maria
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Date
Spring 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1758970
Keywords
Sami
Ethnicity
Language
Gakti
Cultural expression
Abstract
The area of inner Finnmark is often presented as a core Sami area. Many of the cultural markers that are considered and recognised as Sami, are based on traits from these areas. Based on fieldwork done mainly in inner Finnmark, I argue that there is a constant process of expressing a Sami ethnicity within a performance stage defined by both the norms of "how to be Sami" and the ever evolving and breaking of new grounds for this performance. The process might be conceptualised as two axes; one illustrating a measurement of "purity" and the other the constant means of expanding the boundaries for expressions of the Sami ethnicity. Language is a vital foundation that affects both of these axes; although it is used contextually as a marker of Sami ethnicity, it is still an important, perhaps the most important way to assert ones Sami ethnicity, as it makes out the basis of the objective part of the Sami Act’s criteria for how one might be considered Sami. The language is both an important means of communication, and thus social inclusion, but it is also a deeply emotional matter that carries meaning beyond the use as a marker of ethnicity. The gákti (Sami traditional clothes) might be considered the most recognised emblem of Sami ethnicity besides the languages. The making of the gákti is a process that involves both the continuation of cultural specific knowledge, and the composing of new expressions. As the gákti is a garment that pinpoints the wearers geographically based affiliation, it also connects the wearer to a specific social community and might counteract feelings of rootlessness associated with globalisation. Still, it also allows for a range of manipulation within certain boundaries. Based on these two examples, the language and the gákti, I argue that while the Sami ethnic identity needs to take on the challenge of including people into the ethnic group that does not necessarily master this knowledge, this might still be a difficult process for many of the people considering this knowledge as vital for themselves and for their ethnic expression.
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Proposal for ethical guidelines for Sami health research and research on Sami human biological material.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296261
Source
The Samediggi - The Sami Parliament in Norway. 50 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2016]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 7 .3 .3 Respectful and responsible treatment of human biological material and genetic research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 7 .3 .4 Securing collective consent for population studies with previous broad consent
  1 document  
Source
The Samediggi - The Sami Parliament in Norway. 50 p.
Date
[2016]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3643975
Keywords
Sami
Health Research
Ethical guidelines
Consent
Human biological material
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Proposal-for-Ethical-Guidelines-for-Smi-Health-Research-and-Research-on-Smi-Human-Biological-Material.pdf

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Healthy living, nutrition and food waste in the Barents region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296270
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers Arctic Cooperation Programme. 35 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
and healthy lifestyle. For the sustainable development it is important to understand the needs of Arctic youth and elderly; gendered dimensions of Arctic change; securities of food, water and energy; economical role of Arctic settlements, cities, and communities (see more AHDRII, 2014). All
  1 document  
Author
Rautio, Arja
Piippo, Sari
Pongracz, Eva
Golubeva, Elena
Soloviev, Andrey
Grini, Ida S.
Altintzoglou, Themistoklis
Helgesen, Hilde
Source
Nordic Council of Ministers Arctic Cooperation Programme. 35 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1454021
Keywords
Barents Region
Sami
Food waste
Nutrition
Notes
"Healthy food and lifestyle choices in the Arctic"
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