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Community well being and infectious diseases among Alaska Native communities in the Chugach Region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2986
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
sense of community were all fac- tors in staying healthy. Of these, exercise was the means of staying healthy mentioned most often. Participants stated they exercised both through traditional means, such as harvest- ing traditional foods, hunting. and fishing. as well as through modem sports such as
  1 document  
Author
Speier, T.L
Author Affiliation
Alaska Comprehensive and Specialized Evaluation Services (ACSES), University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Psychology, 99508, USA. antls1@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Pages 659-675 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Alaska Natives
Attitude to Health
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infectious diseases
Interviews
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance abuse
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine how Native people of the Chugach Region of Alaska perceive their own communities' health and well being, particularly in regard to infectious diseases. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective focus group interview survey. METHODS: During September to December 1999, 12 focus groups were conducted in seven communities in the Chugach Region of Alaska with 97 participants. Using a set of eight questions, information gathered provided insights into the participants' health-related perceptions and provided previously nonexistent baseline data pertaining toTB and hepatitis. RESULTS: Participants showed a good working knowledge of common infectious diseases. There were misconceptions and a potential for increased knowledge in highly prevalent diseases, but more recently delineated infections in rural Alaska, e.g., respiratory syncvtial virus (RSV), Helicobacter pylori, and less prevalent diseases, e.g., Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The participants expressed a desire for further infectious disease information and dialogue. CONCLUSIONS: This process can be used to develop a risk assessment tool for medical and clinical providers' use in an effort to increase testing for such infectious diseases as HIV, TB, Hepatitis C, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In this case the authors also produced a STD prevention video for rural Alaska Natives, entitled, Summer Sun Winter Moon.
PubMed ID
11768448 View in PubMed
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Linkages between human health and ocean health: a participatory climate change vulnerability assessment for marine mammal harvesters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107731
Source
Pages 759-765 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):759-765
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
advances local, rather than academic, use of traditional knowledge. Keywords: qualitative methods; climate change; adaptation; vulnerability; food security; indigenous CQ\C-~ION T he Bering Strait Region is facing both rapid climactic changes and accelerating industrial de- velopment (1), which
  1 document  
Author
Lily Gadamus
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources Division, Kawerak, Inc., Nome, Alaska AK-99762, USA
Source
Pages 759-765 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):759-765
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Focus Groups
Food Safety
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Oceans and Seas
Seals, Earless
Walruses
Abstract
Indigenous residents of Alaska's Bering Strait Region depend, both culturally and nutritionally, on ice seal and walrus harvests. Currently, climate change and resultant increases in marine industrial development threaten these species and the cultures that depend on them.
To document: (a) local descriptions of the importance of marine mammal hunting; (b) traditional methods for determining if harvested marine mammals are safe to consume; and (c) marine mammal outcomes that would have adverse effects on community health, the perceived causes of these outcomes, strategies for preventing these outcomes and community adaptations to outcomes that cannot be mitigated.
Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 82 indigenous hunters and elders from the Bering Strait region. Standard qualitative analysis was conducted on interview transcripts, which were coded for both inductive and deductive codes. Responses describing marine mammal food safety and importance are presented using inductively generated categories. Responses describing negative marine mammal outcomes are presented in a vulnerability framework, which links human health outcomes to marine conditions.
Project participants perceived that shipping noise and pollution, as well as marine mammal food source depletion by industrial fishing, posed the greatest threats to marine mammal hunting traditions. Proposed adaptations primarily fell into 2 categories: (a) greater tribal influence over marine policy; and (b) documentation of traditional knowledge for local use. This paper presents 1 example of documenting traditional knowledge as an adaptation strategy: traditional methods for determining if marine mammal food is safe to eat.
Participant recommendations indicate that 1 strategy to promote rural Alaskan adaptation to climate change is to better incorporate local knowledge and values into decision-making processes. Participant interest in documenting traditional knowledge for local use also indicates that funding agencies could support climate change adaptation by awarding more grants for tribal research that advances local, rather than academic, use of traditional knowledge.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2007 May 11;316(5826):847-5117495163
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Sep 25;104(39):15188-9317881580
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jul 8;100(14):8074-912792023
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Sep;75(6):1067-7722703884
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Dec 21;107(51):22026-3121135232
PubMed ID
23984268 View in PubMed
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