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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
environmental security of the Alas- k a n I n u i t c o a s t l i n e d e p e n d e d “ u p o n t h e s t r e n g t h o f ( s e l f ) government in Canada and Greenland”, and only when we all have our own home rule governments, “will we be able to really trust any offshore operation in the Beaufort
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3181838
Keywords
Canada
Inuit
Environment
Wildlife & harvesting
Research & health activities
Human Rights
Documents

06-07_annual_report_lenglish.pdf

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Prevalence of food insecurity in a Greenlandic community and the importance of social, economic and environmental stressors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143145
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):285-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Christina Goldhar
James D Ford
Lea Berrang-Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Memorial University St. John's, NL A1B 3X9, Canada. christina.goldhar@mun.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):285-303
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diet
Environment
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Characterize and examine the prevalence of food insecurity in Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland, and identify stressors affecting the food system.
A mixed-methods study using quantitative food security surveys and semi-structured interviews.
Food security surveys (n=61) were conducted with a random sample of 6% of Qeqertarsuaq's population. Semi-structured interviews (n=75) allowed participants to describe in their own words their experience of food insecurity and permitted in-depth examination of determinants. Key informant interviews were used to provide context to local perspectives.
Prevalence of food insecurity (8%) is low. However, interviews reveal a more nuanced picture, with women, adults aged 55+, and non-hunters reporting constrained access to Greenlandic foods. Barriers restricting traditional food access include changing sea ice conditions, reduced availability of some species, high costs of hunting and purchasing food, tightening food sharing networks, and hunting and fishing regulations.
While the Qeqertarsuaq food system is relatively secure, the research highlights susceptibility to social, economic and environmental stressors which may become more prevalent in the future.
PubMed ID
20519090 View in PubMed
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International Arctic Observations Assessment Framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295342
Source
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, Washington, DC, U.S.A., and Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks, Oslo, Norway. 73 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2017
(Economy, Environment, People, and Climate). The discussion groups commented on the preliminary SBA descriptions, adjusted the proposed sub-areas, and developed key objectives and associated descriptions for the 12 SBAs. 1. Disaster Preparedness 2. Environmental Quality 3. Food Security 4
  1 document  
Author
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute
Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks
Source
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, Washington, DC, U.S.A., and Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks, Oslo, Norway. 73 pp.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
857757
Keywords
Arctic
Observation tools
Economy
Environment
People
Climate
Abstract
On January 12 and 13, 2017, the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) and the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) co-hosted a workshop to develop an international Arctic Observations Assessment Framework. The workshop convened experts from international, state, and local governments; industry; academia; and non-governmental organizations to review and revise a framework for assessing the societal benefits derived from Arctic observations. The goal of the workshop was to achieve international consensus on a comprehensive set of key objectives that rely on these observations.
Documents

STPI-SAON-International-Arctic-Observations-Framework-Report-2017.pdf

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Assessment of Food Waste Prevention and Recycling Strategies Using a Multilayer Systems Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274424
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Dec 15;49(24):13937-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
Helen A Hamilton
M Samantha Peverill
Daniel B Müller
Helge Brattebø
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Dec 15;49(24):13937-45
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Biomass
Energy-Generating Resources
Environment
Food - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply
Garbage
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Phosphorus - analysis
Recycling - methods
Systems Analysis
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Food waste (FW) generates large upstream and downstream emissions to the environment and unnecessarily consumes natural resources, potentially affecting future food security. The ecological impacts of FW can be addressed by the upstream strategies of FW prevention or by downstream strategies of FW recycling, including energy and nutrient recovery. While FW recycling is often prioritized in practice, the ecological implications of the two strategies remain poorly understood from a quantitative systems perspective. Here, we develop a multilayer systems framework and scenarios to quantify the implications of food waste strategies on national biomass, energy, and phosphorus (P) cycles, using Norway as a case study. We found that (i) avoidable food waste in Norway accounts for 17% of sold food; (ii) 10% of the avoidable food waste occurs at the consumption stage, while industry and retailers account for only 7%; (iii) the theoretical potential for systems-wide net process energy savings is 16% for FW prevention and 8% for FW recycling; (iv) the theoretical potential for systems-wide P savings is 21% for FW prevention and 9% for FW recycling; (v) while FW recycling results in exclusively domestic nutrient and energy savings, FW prevention leads to domestic and international savings due to large food imports; (vi) most effective is a combination of prevention and recycling, however, FW prevention reduces the potential for FW recycling and therefore needs to be prioritized to avoid potential overcapacities for FW recycling.
PubMed ID
26496178 View in PubMed
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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2010]
security should be based on the promotion of human rights and international cooperation that should include economic trade, cultural exchanges, environmental protection, food, circumpolar research, and other peaceful initiatives. 11. Inuit and other northern peoples should work together to ensure that
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council.
Date
[2010]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2584042
Keywords
Inuit
Rights
Security
Environment
Social
Cultural
Economics
Education
Science
Documents

g100765_Inuit_Arctic_Policy-June02.pdf

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Canada's relationship with Inuit : a history of policy and program development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294623
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
June 2006
in exchange for European goods, such as metal knives and needles, rifles, tobacco, cloth and food. Items bartered by Inuit included caribou skins and meat, whalebone, walrus ivory, dogs and fish. The whaling industry peaked in the 1860s. Afterwards, whaling crews supplemented their incomes with
  1 document  
Author
Bonesteel, Sarah
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Date
June 2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
16013414
Keywords
Inuit
History
Housing
Health care
Education
Economic development
Self-governement
Environment
Notes
ISBN: 978-1-100-11121-6
Documents

inuit-book_1100100016901_eng.pdf

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Animistic pragmatism and native ways of knowing: adaptive strategies for overcoming the struggle for food in the sub-Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107659
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
environmental challenges like food security. Results. Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition,1 for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. Th ey are human "supercomputers," historical
  1 document  
Author
Raymond Anthony
Author Affiliation
Department of Philosophy, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Environment
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Philosophy
Abstract
Subsistence norms are part of the "ecosophy" or ecological philosophy of Alaska Native Peoples in the sub-Arctic, such as the Inupiat of Seward Peninsula. This kind of animistic pragmatism is a special source of practical wisdom that spans over thousands of years and which has been instrumental in the Iñupiat's struggle to survive and thrive in harsh and evolving environments.
I hope to show how narrative in relationship to the "ecosophy" of Alaska Native peoples can help to promote a more ecological orientation to address food insecurity in rural communities in Alaska. Alaska Native ecosophy recommends central values and virtues necessary to help address concerns in Alaska's rural communities.
Here, I will tease out the nature of this "ecosophy" in terms of animistic pragmatism and then show why this form of pragmatism can be instrumental for problematizing multi-scalar, intergenerational, uncertain and complex environmental challenges like food security.
Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition, for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. They are human "supercomputers," historical epistemologists and moral philosophers of a sort who use narrative, a form of moral testimony, to help their communities face challenges and seize opportunities in the wake of an ever-changing landscape.
The "ecosophy" of the Iñupiat of Seward Peninsula offers examples of "focal practices", which are essential for environmental education. These focal practices instil key virtues, namely humility, gratitude, self-reliance, attentiveness, responsibility and responsiveness, that are necessary for subsistence living.
Notes
Cites: J Med Philos. 1996 Jun;21(3):303-208803811
PubMed ID
23986900 View in PubMed
Documents
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Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107889
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
FEATURED PRESENTATIONS Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security S. Craig Gerlach 1 * and Philip A. Loring2 1 Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA; 2Alaska Center for Climate Assessment
  1 document  
Author
S Craig Gerlach
Philip A Loring
Author Affiliation
Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99712, USA. scgerlach@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Diet - ethnology
Environment
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Multiple climatic, environmental and socio-economic pressures have accumulated to the point where they interfere with the ability of remote rural Alaska Native communities to achieve food security with locally harvestable food resources. The harvest of wild foods has been the historical norm, but most Alaska Native villages are transitioning to a cash economy, with increasing reliance on industrially produced, store-bought foods, and with less reliable access to and reliance on wild, country foods. While commercially available market foods provide one measure of food security, the availability and quality of market foods are subject to the vagaries and vulnerabilities of the global food system; access is dependent on one's ability to pay, is limited to what is available on the shelves of small rural stores, and, store-bought foods do not fulfill the important roles that traditional country foods play in rural communities and cultures. Country food access is also constrained by rising prices of fuel and equipment, a federal and state regulatory framework that sometimes hinders rather than helps rural subsistence users who need to access traditional food resources, a regulatory framework that is often not responsive to changes in climate, weather and seasonality, and a shifting knowledge base in younger generations about how to effectively harvest, process and store wild foods.
The general objective is to provide a framework for understanding the social, cultural, ecological and political dimensions of rural Alaska Native food security, and to provide information on the current trends in rural Alaska Native food systems.
This research is based on our long-term ethnographic, subsistence and food systems work in coastal and interior Alaska. This includes research about the land mammal harvest, the Yukon River and coastal fisheries, community and village gardens, small livestock production and red meat systems that are scaled appropriately to village size and capacity, and food-system intervention strategies designed to rebuild local and rural foodsheds and to restore individual and community health.
The contemporary cultural, economic and nutrition transition has severe consequences for the health of people and for the viability of rural communities, and in ways that are not well tracked by the conventional food security methodologies and frameworks. This article expands the discussion of food security and is premised on a holistic model that integrates the social, cultural, ecological, psychological and biomedical aspects of individual and community health.
We propose a new direction for food-system design that prioritizes the management of place-based food portfolios above the more conventional management of individual resources, one with a commitment to as much local and regional food production and/or harvest for local and regional consumption as is possible, and to community self-reliance and health for rural Alaska Natives.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 2;291(21):2545-615173144
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Mar-Apr;38(2):114-2016595290
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2013 Feb;27(1):55-6322988912
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2006 Dec;9(8):1013-917125565
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-7017451135
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Jul;106(7):1055-6316815122
PubMed ID
23967414 View in PubMed
Documents
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Global environmental challenges to the integrity of Indigenous Peoples' food systems

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282717
Source
Chapter 3, Indigenous Peoples' food systems & well-being, pp. 23-38
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2013
nutrition, mcgill university, montreal, Quebec, Canada Key words > Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Peoples’ food systems, environmental issues, biodiversity, climate change, food security, food sovereignty 25Global environmental challenges to the integrity of Indigenous Peoples’ food systems
  1 document  
Author
Turner, NJ
Plotkin, M
Kuhnlein, HV
Source
Chapter 3, Indigenous Peoples' food systems & well-being, pp. 23-38
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Biodiversity
Climate change
Environment
Food systems
Human nutrition
Indigenous food
Pollution
Abstract
The integrity of Indigenous Peoples' food systems is intimately connected to the overall health of the environment. Recent declines in many aspects of environmental quality, from loss of biodiversity to environmental contamination, have combined with social, economic, political and cultural factors to threaten the health and well-being of Indigenous Peoples, and ultimately of people everywhere. This has affected the quality of indigenous food, restricted its availability or curtailed access to it. All of the global case studies of Indigenous Peoples in the Indigenous Peoples' Food Systems for Health Program indicate concerns over environmental degradation as a major aspect of Indigenous Peoples' declining use of their indigenous food. Interconnected concerns include biodiversity loss of wild species and of cultivated species and varieties; hydroelectric dams and their impacts on fish and other foods; contamination of water and food from a host of chemical, radioactive and biological pollutants; and climate change, with its accompanying uncertainties and instabilities regarding food systems. Reconnecting Indigenous Peoples with their traditional territories, and reversing some of the restrictive regulations against Indigenous Peoples' historical hunting and plant harvesting practices may help to restore and maintain traditional resources. More cooperative arrangements for co-management of habitats and resources should be instated. Collaborative research is recommended, such as that reflected in this volume in which environmental and other relationships among Indigenous Peoples' cultures, lands and resource stewardship are complemented with supporting work by academic partners. Ultimately, this will help to maintain and strengthen the resilience of ecosystems and cultural systems, including diverse and healthy food systems.
Documents

IndigenousPeoplesFoodSystemsCh3.pdf

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Utqiagvik Declaration 2018 As declared by the Inuit of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Chukotka, on the occasion of the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) from 16-19 July 2018 in Utqiagvik, Alaska, and in the context of the Assembly theme.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2018
; Understanding that food security is central to Inuit identity and way of life; is characterized by a healthy environment and encompasses access, availability, economics, physical and mental health, Inuit culture, decision making power and management, and education. Therefore, it will be promoted and endorsed
  1 document  
Source
Utqiagvik Declaration 2018 As declared by the Inuit of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Chukotka, on the occasion of the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) from 16-19 July 2018 in Utqiagvik, Alaska, and in the context of the Assembly theme.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
251228
Keywords
Food security
Families and youth
Health and wellness
Education and language
Indigenous knowledge
Sustainable wildlife management
Environment
Sustainable development
Communication
Inuit
Documents

2018-Utigavik-Declaration.pdf

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Military small group performance under isolation and stress - an annotated bibliography. III. Environmental stress and behavior ecology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297265
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-21.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
following: 11 1 • It1 s killing cold. 2. All fo:ms of life (man included} are few and far between. 3. Apparently mild s·unlight can blind you for weeks. 4. You need more food, particularly fats. 5. Overland travel is laborio"..ls. 6. If you work up a sweat, you are likely to find yourself in
  1 document  
Author
Sells, S.B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-21.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7237445
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Behavior
Groups
Isolation
Deprivation
Environment
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-21
Documents
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2017/18 Annual Report : Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297094
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canda. Ottawa, ON. 76 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
for Inuit and our communities, as such ICC is engaged internationally in many significant health and wellness related projects ranging from suicide preven- tion, food security and climate adapta- tion and resilience. Last fall, ICC (Canada) helped nego- tiate an historic international agree- ment
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canda. Ottawa, ON. 76 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3830676
Keywords
Inuit
Environment
Health
Knowledge
youth
Documents

icc_2017-2018_annual_report_for_web.pdf

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Annual report 2016-17: Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297095
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 30 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2017
included relationship building between Indigenous and non-Indigenous governments and partners. An expert panel addressed ministers on the topic of northern food security. Ministers also received a report regarding benefit agreements between northern communities and resource industries. In late
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 30 p.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
474391
Keywords
Inuit
Knowledge
Environment
Health
Documents

english_final_2016-2017_annual_report.pdf

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Annual Report 2015-2016 : Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297096
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 20 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2016
, Policy, Industry, Security and Environmental Stewardship. The seven expert panelists were asked to challenge the research community to address opportunities and obstacles associated with rapid Arctic change. ICC Canada Annual Report | 2015-2016 Page 5 In January 2016 the ICC Chair’s office
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 20 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4148616
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Biodiversity
Indigenous peoples
Health
Environment
Documents

english_final_2015-2016_annual_report_withcover_fordigital.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
contaminants, environmental security, language and resource development to health and wellness, food security and sovereignty. ICC takes great care in focusing on the issues that impact Inuit the most and where ICC can best contribute. The structure of the Arctic Council is unique among global
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3283810
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Sustainable development
Environment
Health
Mercury
Languages
Documents

merged_document__2_.pdf

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Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 41 p.
Publication Type
Report
supporting ICC Russia. ICC Canada also supported the ICC Chair, Patricia Cochran, in her work on climate change. This has included using ICC's NGO Status at the United Nations to secure the participation of the ICC Chair in the UN Secretary-General's High Level Event on climate change in New York in
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 41 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
879126
Keywords
Inuit
Environment
Sustainable development
Research
Health
Human Rights
Documents

07-08_annual_report_final.pdf

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2010-2011 Annual Report: Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297081
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
shipping; hunting and food security; health and well-being; climate change; contaminants; sharing of traditional knowledge and practices; use of the Inuit language; self-governance; the future of the Arctic Council; and the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. The outcome document, the Nuuk
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2639832
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Health
Environment
Sustainable development
Documents

20102011annualreportenglish.pdf

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Annual Report 2011-2012 : Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297082
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON.
Publication Type
Report
are addressed. Other cross-cutting expert group work addressed by ICC Canada and other ICC offices included the Arctic Resilience Report, a climate expert committee, an ecosystem-based monitoring project, a food security initiative, and others. ICC Canada aimed to bring youth into its work
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7102990
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Biodiversity
Wildlife
Environment
Sustainable development
Contaminants
Documents

annualreport_20112012_eng.pdf

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Young students as participants in school health promotion: an intervention study in a Swedish elementary school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98470
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):498-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Katja Gillander Gådin
Gaby Weiner
Christina Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, SE-870 51 Sundsvall, Sweden. katja.gillander-gadin@miun.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):498-507
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research
Decision Making
Diet
Environment
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Power (Psychology)
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim was to analyse if young students could be substantive participants in a health-promoting school project. The specific aims were to analyse the changes the students proposed in their school environment, how these changes were prioritized by a school health committee and to discuss the students' proposals and the changes from a health and gender perspective. STUDY DESIGN: An intervention project was carried out in an elementary school with students (about 150) in Grades 1 through 6. The intervention included small-group discussions about health promoting factors, following a health education model referred to as "It's your decision." At the last of 6 discussions, the students made suggestions for health-promoting changes in their school environment. A health committee was established with students and staff for the purpose of initiating changes based on the proposals. METHODS: A content analysis was used to analyse the proposals and the protocols developed by the health committee. RESULTS: The analysis showed 6 categories of the students' proposals: social climate, influence on schoolwork, structure and orderliness, security, physical environment and food for well-being. Their priorities corresponded to the students' categories, but had an additional category regarding health education. CONCLUSIONS: Principles that guide promoting good health in schools can be put into action among students as young as those in Grades 1 through 6. Future challenges include how to convey experiences and knowledge to other schools and how to evaluate if inequalities in health because of gender, class and ethnicity can be reduced through the focus on empowerment and participation.
PubMed ID
20044967 View in PubMed
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Arctic social sciences: Opportunites in Arctic research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102064
Source
Report produced for the National Science Foundation Arctic Social Sciences Program. 84 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jun-1999
people responded to environmental changes, such as gradual or catastrophic changes in food supplies, sea-ice cover, or vegetation? What can these responses tell us about our ability to adapt to future changes? • How has the introduction of cash economies changed the relationship of arctic communities to
  1 document  
Author
Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS)
Source
Report produced for the National Science Foundation Arctic Social Sciences Program. 84 p.
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5226690
Keywords
Arctic research
Culture
Economic change
Environment
Ethnic identity
Knowledge systems
Regional identity
Resources
Social science
Abstract
The Arctic is an exciting place for social science research. The circumpolar North offers opportunities rarely availableelsewhere to social scientists, regardless of their discipline ortime period of interest. Accessible archaeological sites, oralhistories, and historical records offer opportunities to study thepast. Cultural, social, economic, and political changes of the present and recent past provide opportunities to study processes,organizations, and policies as they occur and develop.
Documents

NSF_Arctic-Social-Sciences_Opportunities-in-Arctic-Research_June-1999.pdf

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