Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 1.

Reconciling traditional knowledge, food security, and climate change: experience from Old Crow, YT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104280
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Vasiliki Douglas
Hing Man Chan
Sonia Wesche
Cindy Dickson
Norma Kassi
Lorraine Netro
Megan Williams
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Culture
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preservation - economics - methods
Food Storage - economics - methods
Food Supply - economics - methods
Gardening - education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Transportation - economics - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Because of a lack of transportation infrastructure, Old Crow has the highest food costs and greatest reliance on traditional food species for sustenance of any community in Canada's Yukon Territory. Environmental, cultural, and economic change are driving increased perception of food insecurity in Old Crow.
To address community concerns regarding food security and supply in Old Crow and develop adaptation strategies to ameliorate their impact on the community.
A community adaptation workshop was held on October 13, 2009, in which representatives of different stakeholders in the community discussed a variety of food security issues facing Old Crow and how they could be dealt with. Workshop data were analyzed using keyword, subject, and narrative analysis techniques to determine community priorities in food security and adaptation.
Community concern is high and favored adaptation options include agriculture, improved food storage, and conservation through increased traditional education. These results were presented to the community for review and revision, after which the Vuntut Gwitchin Government will integrate them into its ongoing adaptation planning measures.
PubMed ID
24859099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of traditional environmental knowledge to assess the impact of climate change on subsistence fishing in the James Bay Region of Northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125539
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:1878
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Yukari Hori
Benita Tam
William A Gough
Elise Ho-Foong
Jim D Karagatzides
Eric N Liberda
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. y.hori@utoronto.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:1878
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Culture
Ecosystem
Environmental Health - education
Fishes
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Knowledge
Male
Ontario
Temperature
Abstract
In Canada, unique food security challenges are being faced by Aboriginal people living in remote-northern communities due to the impacts of climate change on subsistence harvesting. This study used traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) to investigate whether there was a temporal relationship between extreme climatic events in the summer of 2005, and fish die-offs in the Albany River, northern Ontario, Canada. Also, TEK was utilized to examine a potential shift in subsistence fish species distribution due to climate change.
To investigate whether there was a temporal relationship between the fish die-offs of July 2005 (as identified by TEK) and an extreme climatic event, temperature and daily precipitation data for Moosonee weather station were utilized. To determine if there was an increasing trend in mean maximal summer temperatures with year, temperature data were examined, using regression analysis. Present-day fish distributions were determined using unpublished TEK data collated from previous studies and purposive, semi-directive interviews with elders and experienced bushman.
Fish die-offs in 2005 occurred during the time period 11-18 July, as reported by participants. Recorded air-temperature maxima of the two July 2005 heat waves delineate exactly the time period of fish die-offs. Two heat waves occurring during the same summer season and so close together has never before been recorded for this region. A highly significant (p
PubMed ID
22471525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic Human Development Report : regional processes and global linkages. (AHDR-II)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295208
Source
Norden, Nordic Council of Ministers. TemaNord 2014:567.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
gendered experience of food and other (in)securities (see below) and the gendered nature of Arctic geopolitics. • “Soft securities”: Food, water, and energy – Food security is declining in the Arctic. Both environmental change and globalization play a role, as local foods become less available or
  1 document  
Author
Larsen, Joan Nymand
Fondahl, Gail
Author Affiliation
(eds.)
Source
Norden, Nordic Council of Ministers. TemaNord 2014:567.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
13797930
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Populations
Migration
Culture
Identity
Economics
Governance
Legal systems
Resources usage
Climate change
Human health and well-being
Education
Globalization
Community viability and adaptation
Abstract
The goals of the second volume of the (AHDR-II) Arctic Human Development Report: Regional Processes and Global Linkages – are to provide an update to the first AHDR (2004) in terms of an assessment of the state of Arctic human development; to highlight the major trends and changes unfolding related to the various issues and thematic areas of human development in the Arctic over the past decade; and, based on this assessment, to identify policy relevant conclusions and key gaps in knowledge, new and emerging Arctic success stories, and important AHDR-II follow-up activities.
Documents
Less detail

Sami responses to poverty in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295960
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
parliament ten years before the Norwegian Sami and twenty before the Swedish Sami. The Finnish Sami also receive many of the same political privileges as the Norwegian Sami. Yet in Finland the Sami argue that there are no Sami-specific laws to secure them additional rights through their indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Burmeister Hicks, Christian Jakob
Somby, Ande
Source
In Indigenous peoples & poverty : an international perspective by CROP International Studies in Poverty Research. chapter 15. pp 274-289.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
104698
Keywords
Sami
Poverty
Political history
Culture
Education
Reindeer
Documents

Indigenous-Peoples-and-Poverty---An-International-Perspective.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107889
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
FEATURED PRESENTATIONS Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security S. Craig Gerlach 1 * and Philip A. Loring2 1 Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA; 2Alaska Center for Climate Assessment
  1 document  
Author
S Craig Gerlach
Philip A Loring
Author Affiliation
Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99712, USA. scgerlach@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Diet - ethnology
Environment
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Multiple climatic, environmental and socio-economic pressures have accumulated to the point where they interfere with the ability of remote rural Alaska Native communities to achieve food security with locally harvestable food resources. The harvest of wild foods has been the historical norm, but most Alaska Native villages are transitioning to a cash economy, with increasing reliance on industrially produced, store-bought foods, and with less reliable access to and reliance on wild, country foods. While commercially available market foods provide one measure of food security, the availability and quality of market foods are subject to the vagaries and vulnerabilities of the global food system; access is dependent on one's ability to pay, is limited to what is available on the shelves of small rural stores, and, store-bought foods do not fulfill the important roles that traditional country foods play in rural communities and cultures. Country food access is also constrained by rising prices of fuel and equipment, a federal and state regulatory framework that sometimes hinders rather than helps rural subsistence users who need to access traditional food resources, a regulatory framework that is often not responsive to changes in climate, weather and seasonality, and a shifting knowledge base in younger generations about how to effectively harvest, process and store wild foods.
The general objective is to provide a framework for understanding the social, cultural, ecological and political dimensions of rural Alaska Native food security, and to provide information on the current trends in rural Alaska Native food systems.
This research is based on our long-term ethnographic, subsistence and food systems work in coastal and interior Alaska. This includes research about the land mammal harvest, the Yukon River and coastal fisheries, community and village gardens, small livestock production and red meat systems that are scaled appropriately to village size and capacity, and food-system intervention strategies designed to rebuild local and rural foodsheds and to restore individual and community health.
The contemporary cultural, economic and nutrition transition has severe consequences for the health of people and for the viability of rural communities, and in ways that are not well tracked by the conventional food security methodologies and frameworks. This article expands the discussion of food security and is premised on a holistic model that integrates the social, cultural, ecological, psychological and biomedical aspects of individual and community health.
We propose a new direction for food-system design that prioritizes the management of place-based food portfolios above the more conventional management of individual resources, one with a commitment to as much local and regional food production and/or harvest for local and regional consumption as is possible, and to community self-reliance and health for rural Alaska Natives.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 2;291(21):2545-615173144
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Mar-Apr;38(2):114-2016595290
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2013 Feb;27(1):55-6322988912
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2006 Dec;9(8):1013-917125565
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-7017451135
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Jul;106(7):1055-6316815122
PubMed ID
23967414 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Animistic pragmatism and native ways of knowing: adaptive strategies for overcoming the struggle for food in the sub-Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107659
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
environmental challenges like food security. Results. Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition,1 for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. Th ey are human "supercomputers," historical
  1 document  
Author
Raymond Anthony
Author Affiliation
Department of Philosophy, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
Source
Pages 811-817 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):811-817
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Environment
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Philosophy
Abstract
Subsistence norms are part of the "ecosophy" or ecological philosophy of Alaska Native Peoples in the sub-Arctic, such as the Inupiat of Seward Peninsula. This kind of animistic pragmatism is a special source of practical wisdom that spans over thousands of years and which has been instrumental in the Iñupiat's struggle to survive and thrive in harsh and evolving environments.
I hope to show how narrative in relationship to the "ecosophy" of Alaska Native peoples can help to promote a more ecological orientation to address food insecurity in rural communities in Alaska. Alaska Native ecosophy recommends central values and virtues necessary to help address concerns in Alaska's rural communities.
Here, I will tease out the nature of this "ecosophy" in terms of animistic pragmatism and then show why this form of pragmatism can be instrumental for problematizing multi-scalar, intergenerational, uncertain and complex environmental challenges like food security.
Native elders have been the embodiment of trans-generational distributed cognition, for example, collective memory, norms, information, knowledge, technical skills and experimental adaptive strategies. They are human "supercomputers," historical epistemologists and moral philosophers of a sort who use narrative, a form of moral testimony, to help their communities face challenges and seize opportunities in the wake of an ever-changing landscape.
The "ecosophy" of the Iñupiat of Seward Peninsula offers examples of "focal practices", which are essential for environmental education. These focal practices instil key virtues, namely humility, gratitude, self-reliance, attentiveness, responsibility and responsiveness, that are necessary for subsistence living.
Notes
Cites: J Med Philos. 1996 Jun;21(3):303-208803811
PubMed ID
23986900 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Impact of Euro-Canadian agrarian practices: in search of sustainable import-substitution strategies to enhance food security in subarctic Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114060
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Apr-Jun;13(2):2211
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nicole F Spiegelaar
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
University of Waterloo, West Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. nicolespieg@gmail.com
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013 Apr-Jun;13(2):2211
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agriculture - methods
Arctic Regions
Culture
Ecosystem
Europe
Food Supply - standards
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Population Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Resource Allocation
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Soil - chemistry
Vegetables
Abstract
In Canada, food insecurity exists among Aboriginal (Inuit, Metis and First Nations) people living in remote northern communities, in part, because of their reliance on the industrialized, import-based food system. Local food production as a substitute to imports would be an adaptive response, but enhancement of food security via food localization requires reflection on previous failings of conventional agricultural strategies so that informed decisions can be made. In light of potential reintroduction of local food production in remote First Nations communities, we investigated the cultural, social and ecological effects of a 20th century, Euro-Canadian agrarian settlement on the food system of a subarctic First Nation; this will act as the first step in developing a more sustainable local food program and enhancing food security in this community.
To investigate the socio-cultural impacts of the Euro-Canadian agrarian initiative on the food system of Fort Albany First Nation, purposive, semi-directive interviews were conducted with elders and other knowledgeable community members. Interview data were placed into themes using inductive analyses. To determine the biophysical impact of the agrarian initiative, soil samples were taken from one site within the cultivated area and from one site in an undisturbed forest area. Soil properties associated with agricultural use and productivity were assessed. To compare the means of a given soil property between the sites, one-tailed t-tests were employed. Vegetative analysis was conducted in both sites to assess disturbance.
According to the interviewees, prior to the agrarian initiative, First Nation families harvested wild game and fish, and gathered berries as well as other forms of vegetation for sustenance. With the introduction of the residential school and agrarian initiative, traditional food practices were deemed inadequate, families were forced to work and live in the settlement (becoming less reliant on traditional foods), and yet little knowledge sharing of agricultural practices occurred. When the residential school and agrarian movement came to an end in the 1970s, First Nation community members were left to become reliant on an import food system. The mission's agrarian techniques resulted in overall degradation of soil quality and ecological integrity: compared the natural boreal forest, the cultivated area had been colonized by invasive species and had significantly lower soil levels of nitrogen, magnesium and organic carbon, and significantly higher levels of phosphorus and bulk density.
Because the agrarian initiative was not a viable long-term approach to food security in Fort Albany, the people became more reliant on imported goods. Taking into account climate change, there exists an opportunity whereby fruits and vegetables, historically stunted-in-growth or outside the distributional range of subarctic Canada, could now grow in the north. Together, agroecosystem stewardship practices and community-based, autonomous food security programs have the potential to increase locally grown food availability in a sustainable manner.
PubMed ID
23656359 View in PubMed
Less detail

Traditional and market food access in Arctic Canada is affected by economic factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79628
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
participants said they could not afford to go hunting or fishing. Conclusions. Affordability of market food and accessibility to hunting and fishing in Arctic Canada were major barriers to Indigenous women’s food security. (Int J Circumpolar Health 2006: 65(4): 331-340.) Keywords: food security, Arctic
  1 document  
Author
Lambden Jill
Receveur Olivier
Marshall Joan
Kuhnlein Harriet V
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
358177
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Diet - economics - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the access that Indigenous women have to traditional and market foods in 44 communities across Arctic Canada. STUDY DESIGN: This secondary data analysis used a cross-sectional survey of 1771 Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis and Inuit women stratified by age. METHODS: Socio-cultural questionnaires were used to investigate food access and chi-square testing was used to ascertain the distribution of subject responses by age and region. RESULTS: There was considerable regional variation in the ability to afford adequate food, with between 40% and 70% saying they could afford enough food. Similarly, regional variation was reflected in the percentage of the population who could afford, or had access to, hunting or fishing equipment. Up to 50% of the responses indicated inadequate access to fishing and hunting equipment, and up to 46% of participants said they could not afford to go hunting or fishing. CONCLUSIONS: Affordability of market food and accessibility to hunting and fishing in Arctic Canada were major barriers to Indigenous women's food security.
PubMed ID
17131971 View in PubMed
Documents

f7b267306c8901d32a53280049bb1775244d.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Proceedings: 14th Inuit Studies Conference. 11-15 August 2004, the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297328
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2005
environmental assessment for a proposed mineral development in Nunavut Natasha Thorpe and Emily Angulalik 7 Accessing stories through ethnographic film Shelley Tulloch, Michelle Daveluy and John Houston I – Local Food and Contaminants 1 A regional approach to managing and communicating environment, health
  1 document  
Author
van Everdingen, Robert O.
Source
Arctic Institute of North America. 394 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
2332621
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Language
Culture
Traditional knowledge
Health
Notes
ISBN 1-894788-02-8
Documents
Less detail

Riddu Riddu, joik or rock-n-roll? A study of Riddu Riddu Festivála and its role as a cultural tool for ethnic revialization [sic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297029
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
April 2008
dwellings, sometimes their occupations (e.g. reindeer herding) and rarely – food and handicrafts. This is accompanied by other outdoor activities and musical performances. These festivals function mainly as cultural ‘show-offs’, with little focus or discussions on the peoples’ lives. Therefore I
  1 document  
Author
Leonenko, Anastassia Valerievna
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Date
April 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1656646
Keywords
International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála
Manndalen
Coastal Saami
Culture
Language
Lifestyle
Revitalisation
Abstract
The International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála has taken place every year since 1991 in Manndalen, a Coastal Saami hamlet, in the municipality of Kåfjord in the county of Troms in the North of Norway. The festival represents by itself an independent event that through indigenous management and developed ethno-relations inside the country, promoting the idea of cultural awareness and sensitivity to all ethnic groups, however different they might be, and support them in terms of preservation of their culture, language, and lifestyle in our global and developed world.
This thesis is intended to show the ambiguity and complexity of the Coastal Saami identity in Manndalen, not only with relation to Norwegians, but also with reference to the situation among locals, between adults and youth, traditions and modernity. In other words, which relations between traditions and modernity does Riddu Riddu demonstrate? Therefore this thesis will try to find out the relation of manndalinger to the cultural invention and show their chosen way of the invasion of traditions and how far they accept distortions as authentic to their heritage during the process of cultural invention and which sign-substitutions can be defined in relation to Coastal Saami culture today. Moreover, the purpose of this thesis is to understand the process by which means invented portions of culture acquire authenticity. In other words, how the social reproduction of culture – the process whereby people learn, embody, and transmit the conventional behaviours of their society (Hanson 1989:898) – is happening in the Coastal Saami community today. Therefore the Riddu Riddu festival will be considered further as one of the examples of Coastal Saami cultural invention with the purpose of revitalization an ethnic identity.
Thus, the Riddu Riddu festival can be seen as a visible tool in Manndalen’s process of ethnic revitalisation. In this case, can the festival be considered as an example of an imagined community (Anderson 1983), created as a cultural arena for the Saami political debates and bringing Saami people, the young and the old generation, together? Further, the festival can be seen as an important tool in the process of Coastal Saami ethnic revitalisation with perspectives on northern indigenous and in general world community nowadays. What is the role of this imagined community for its participants? What challenges do manndalinger have in creating both a local and a global symbolic community?
This master thesis is tended to bring up questions for further discussions and become one of the colourful pieces in the mosaic of understanding the Riddu Riddu festival and its role in the revitalisation of Saami identity.
Documents
Less detail

Arctic social sciences: Opportunites in Arctic research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102064
Source
Report produced for the National Science Foundation Arctic Social Sciences Program. 84 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jun-1999
people responded to environmental changes, such as gradual or catastrophic changes in food supplies, sea-ice cover, or vegetation? What can these responses tell us about our ability to adapt to future changes? • How has the introduction of cash economies changed the relationship of arctic communities to
  1 document  
Author
Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS)
Source
Report produced for the National Science Foundation Arctic Social Sciences Program. 84 p.
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5226690
Keywords
Arctic research
Culture
Economic change
Environment
Ethnic identity
Knowledge systems
Regional identity
Resources
Social science
Abstract
The Arctic is an exciting place for social science research. The circumpolar North offers opportunities rarely availableelsewhere to social scientists, regardless of their discipline ortime period of interest. Accessible archaeological sites, oralhistories, and historical records offer opportunities to study thepast. Cultural, social, economic, and political changes of the present and recent past provide opportunities to study processes,organizations, and policies as they occur and develop.
Documents

NSF_Arctic-Social-Sciences_Opportunities-in-Arctic-Research_June-1999.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 1.