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[Significance of socio-hygienic conditions at food-processing plants for securing the quality of food products].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232874
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Jul;(7):77-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988

Vavilov's Collection of Worldwide Crop Genetic Resources in the 21st Century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296807
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2018 Oct; 16(5):377-383
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
N I Dzyubenko
Author Affiliation
The N.I. Vavilov All Russian Institute of Plant Genetic Resources, Federal Research Center , St. Petersburg, Russia .
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2018 Oct; 16(5):377-383
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources
Crops, Agricultural - genetics
Food Supply
Genetic Variation
History, 21st Century
Russia
Seed Bank - history - organization & administration
Seeds - genetics - growth & development
Abstract
N.I. Vavilov was among the first scientists who recognized the high potential value of plant genetic resources (PGR) for humankind. In addition to his fundamental work on the centers of crop origin, he emphasized the importance of collection and ex situ conservation of cultivated plants and their wild relatives, to make them available for breeding programs and for future generations. Vavilov's ideas formed a solid scientific basis for the long-term efforts on securing PGR in ex situ genebanks, both internationally and in Russia. The collection of seeds and living plants at the N.I. Vavilov All Russian Institute of Plant Genetic Resources (VIR) is one of the oldest in the world. The size of the collection increased from 301 accessions in 1901 to over 330,000 accessions in 2017, now representing 64 botanical families, 376 genera, and 2169 species. Acquisition was mainly focused on crops that are suitable for cultivation in Russia such as potatoes, barley, wheat, sorghum, beans, vegetables, forage species, and many others. For over a century, VIR has been providing the materials for breeding programs and research, which resulted in developing new cultivars with unique characteristics such as high yield combined with deceased resistance, improved storability, cold and drought tolerance, or ability to grow on deserts and polluted lands. The main field collection near St. Petersburg and 11 main branches across the country covering a wide spectrum of climatic conditions combined with modern seed storage, in vitro and cryobank facilities, and molecular laboratories form a solid platform for breeding, regeneration, and evaluation of accessions in the collection. This article gives a brief overview of VIR as the leading genebank and breeding center in Russia, its main activities in conservation and utilization of PGR for national food security and its role in developing national policies in this area.
PubMed ID
30325664 View in PubMed
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International Arctic Observations Assessment Framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295342
Source
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, Washington, DC, U.S.A., and Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks, Oslo, Norway. 73 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2017
(Economy, Environment, People, and Climate). The discussion groups commented on the preliminary SBA descriptions, adjusted the proposed sub-areas, and developed key objectives and associated descriptions for the 12 SBAs. 1. Disaster Preparedness 2. Environmental Quality 3. Food Security 4
  1 document  
Author
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute
Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks
Source
IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, Washington, DC, U.S.A., and Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks, Oslo, Norway. 73 pp.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
857757
Keywords
Arctic
Observation tools
Economy
Environment
People
Climate
Abstract
On January 12 and 13, 2017, the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) and the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) co-hosted a workshop to develop an international Arctic Observations Assessment Framework. The workshop convened experts from international, state, and local governments; industry; academia; and non-governmental organizations to review and revise a framework for assessing the societal benefits derived from Arctic observations. The goal of the workshop was to achieve international consensus on a comprehensive set of key objectives that rely on these observations.
Documents

STPI-SAON-International-Arctic-Observations-Framework-Report-2017.pdf

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Historical warnings of future food insecurity with unprecedented seasonal heat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95460
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2009
Author
Battisti David S
Naylor Rosamond L
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1640, USA. battisti@washington.edu
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Date
Jan-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa South of the Sahara
Agriculture - trends
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Climate
Commerce
Crops, Agricultural - economics - growth & development
Droughts
Extreme Heat
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics
Forecasting
France
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature
Humans
Seasons
Tropical Climate
Ukraine
Abstract
Higher growing season temperatures can have dramatic impacts on agricultural productivity, farm incomes, and food security. We used observational data and output from 23 global climate models to show a high probability (>90%) that growing season temperatures in the tropics and subtropics by the end of the 21st century will exceed the most extreme seasonal temperatures recorded from 1900 to 2006. In temperate regions, the hottest seasons on record will represent the future norm in many locations. We used historical examples to illustrate the magnitude of damage to food systems caused by extreme seasonal heat and show that these short-run events could become long-term trends without sufficient investments in adaptation.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2009 Apr 10;324(5924):177-9; author reply 177-919359565
Comment In: Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):19319131598
PubMed ID
19131626 View in PubMed
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Local observations of climate change and impacts on traditional food security in two northern Aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95657
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Guyot Melissa
Dickson Cindy
Paci Chris
Furgal Chris
Chan Hing Man
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-15
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Fresh Water
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Water supply
Weather
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our primary objective was to record participant observations of changes in the local environment, harvesting situations and traditional food species and to explore what impact these may have on traditional food. STUDY DESIGN: A participatory study with 2 northern Aboriginal communities in Canada. METHODS: Focus groups were conducted in both communities. Both specific and open-ended questions were asked, to gather information about the traditional food harvest and a qualitative analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Members from both communities are witnessing variable changes in climate that are affecting their traditional food harvest. New species and changes in migration of species being observed by community members have the potential to affect the consumption of traditional food. Similarly, changes in water levels in and around harvesting areas are affecting access to harvest areas, which in turn affects the traditional food harvest. CONCLUSIONS: Community members have been required to change their harvest mechanisms to adapt to changes in climate and ensure an adequate supply of traditional food. A strong commitment to programs that will ensure the protection of traditional food systems is necessary.
PubMed ID
17319085 View in PubMed
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Workshop 4 (synthesis): securing food production under climate variability--exploring the options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95854
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Björklund G.
Author Affiliation
GeWa Consulting, Marmorvägen 16A, 75244 Uppsala, Sweden. gunilla.bjorklund@telia.com
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bangladesh
Climate
Disasters
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Rivers
Water supply
Abstract
Climate variabilities may result in different types of dry spells, droughts or flood situations, having harmful effects on agricultural productivity and food security. Long-term trends in climate variabilities and climate extremes may be a consequence of an on-going climate change and would thus result in a more permanent change in the pre-conditions for food production. The presentations and discussion during the workshop concentrated on some different measures to be taken in addressing these kind of situations and in particularly on the adverse effects of dry spells, droughts and to some extent also floods. The different areas presented were examples from Bangladesh, the indus river and delta region, examples from India (Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh), Israel, Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan.
PubMed ID
15195431 View in PubMed
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Climate change and water security with a focus on the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130014
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
country foods. The industries also use large quantities of surface water during winter to build ice roads and maintain infra- structure. For all of these reasons, it is critical to understand the impacts of climate change on water security in the Arctic with its specific demands. Arctic warming
  1 document  
Author
Birgitta Evengard
Jim Berner
Michael Brubaker
Gert Mulvad
Boris Revich
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.evengard@climi.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
216402
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate
Climate change
Environmental monitoring
Health status
Humans
Water Cycle
Water supply
Abstract
Water is of fundamental importance for human life; access to water of good quality is of vital concern for mankind. Currently however, the situation is under severe pressure due to several stressors that have a clear impact on access to water. In the Arctic, climate change is having an impact on water availability by melting glaciers, decreasing seasonal rates of precipitation, increasing evapotranspiration, and drying lakes and rivers existing in permafrost grounds. Water quality is also being impacted as manmade pollutants stored in the environment are released, lowland areas are flooded with salty ocean water during storms, turbidity from permafrost-driven thaw and erosion is increased, and the growth or emergence of natural pollutants are increased. By 2030 it is estimated that the world will need to produce 50% more food and energy which means a continuous increase in demand for water. Decisionmakers will have to very clearly include life quality aspects of future generations in the work as impact of ongoing changes will be noticeable, in many cases, in the future. This article will focus on effects of climate-change on water security with an Arctic perspective giving some examples from different countries how arising problems are being addressed.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):266-7321703129
Cites: J Exp Bot. 2011 Jun;62(10):3263-7121515638
Cites: Nature. 2010 Sep 30;467(7315):555-6120882010
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
Cites: Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2006 Jan;63(1):100-716399161
PubMed ID
22043217 View in PubMed
Documents

Evengard-Climate-change.pdf

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Hepatitis as it relates to the Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1636
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):529-536
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
incubation period and during the early acute phase of illness, providing a to- tal period of potential infectivity of three to four weeks. Although numerouc; common- :-ource outbreak~ have been traced to con- taminated food item'> or water supplies, transmission usually occurs by direct person-to-person
  1 document  
Author
McCollum, R.W
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):529-536
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate
Epidemics
Humans
Kiana
Kotzebue
Savoonga
Seasonal periodicity
Hepatitis A - epidemiology
Hepatitis B - epidemiology
Seasons
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1931.
Documents

67-15-Hepatitis as it Relates to the Arctic.pdf

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The right to food security in a changing Arctic: the Nunavut Food Security Coalition and the Feeding My Family campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297088
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2013
Case studies: loCal solutions The right to food security in a changing Arctic: the Nunavut Food Security Coalition and the Feeding My Family campaign Overview About 160,000 indigenous Inuit live in four countries across the Arctic — Canada, Greenland, United States (Alaska) and Russia
  1 document  
Author
Papatsie, Lessee
Ellsworth, Leanna
Meakin, Stephanie
Kurvits, Tiina
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
401594
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Subsistence
Traditional knowledge
Climate
Documents

DublinConferenceOnHungerNutritionAndClimateJustice_NunavutCaseStudy.pdf

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Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region--a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260450
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christina Hedlund
Yulia Blomstedt
Barbara Schumann
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate
Climate change
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Weather
Abstract
The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases.
To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region.
A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article.
In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14), the rest from Sweden (n=6), Finland (n=4), Norway (n=2), Russia (n=2), and Alaska, US (n=1). Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn.
More studies of high quality are needed to investigate the adverse health impacts of weather and climatic factors in the Arctic and subarctic region. No studies from Greenland or Iceland were found, and only a few from Siberia and Alaska. Disease and syndromic surveillance should be part of climate change adaptation measures in the Arctic and subarctic regions, with monitoring of extreme weather events known to pose a risk for certain infectious diseases implemented at the community level.
Notes
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Jul;50(6):385-9116575582
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Apr;141(4):671-8622877498
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Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006 Jul;25(7):426-3216810531
PubMed ID
24990685 View in PubMed
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The Role of Trust in Sustainable Management of Land, Fish, and Wildlife Populations in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294079
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
and cultural norms greatly influence inherent trust. Within Inuit communities, strong sharing networks (i.e., food, equipment, etc.) require a certain level of trust and acceptance of vulnerability because resources can come and go, and one day that same individual or family may be without supplies
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt JI
Clark D
Lokken N
Lankshear J
Hausner V
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1781887
Keywords
Arctic
Knowledge
Governance
Indigenous
Trust
Wildlife
Land
Sustainability
Management
Natural resources
Nunavut
Churchill
Climate
Alaska
Abstract
Sustainable resource management depends on support from the public and local stakeholders. Fish, wildlife, and land management in remote areas face the challenge of working across vast areas, often with limited resources, to monitor land use or the status of the fish-and-wildlife populations. Resource managers depend on local residents, often Indigenous, to gain information about environmental changes and harvest trends. Developing mutual trust is thus important for the transfer of knowledge and sustainable use of land resources. We interviewed residents of eight communities in Arctic Alaska and Canada and analyzed their trust in resource governance organizations using mixed-methods. Trust was much greater among Alaska (72%) and Nunavut (62%) residents than Churchill (23%). Trust was highest for organizations that dealt with fish and wildlife issues, had no legal enforcement rights, and were associated with Indigenous peoples. Local organizations were trusted more than non-local in Alaska and Nunavut, but the opposite was true in Churchill. Association tests and modeling indicated that characteristics of organizations were significantly related to trust, whereas education was among the few individual-level characteristics that mattered for trust. Familiarity, communication, and education are crucial to improve, maintain, or foster trust for more effective management of natural resources in such remote communities.
Documents
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Nutritive quality and protein production from grain legumes in a boreal climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273412
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2015 Aug 15;95(10):2053-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2015
Author
Clara I Lizarazo
Anna-Maija Lampi
Jingwei Liu
Tuula Sontag-Strohm
Vieno Piironen
Frederick L Stoddard
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2015 Aug 15;95(10):2053-64
Date
Aug-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Climate
Fabaceae - chemistry - physiology
Finland
Nutritive Value - physiology
Plant Proteins - chemistry - metabolism - standards
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Boreal cropping systems are heavily focused on the production of small-grain cereals; to improve their resilience to climate change and to achieve food and feed security, diversification is needed. This study investigated the potential of faba bean, narrow-leafed lupin and lentil as protein crops in southern Finland, where faba bean is traditional but the other two are novel.
Early cultivars of narrow-leafed lupin and lentil matured adequately. Protein concentration in faba bean was, at 32%, higher than the world average of 29%, while those of narrow-leafed lupin and lentil were close to their world averages. Protein yields decreased in the order faba bean > narrow-leafed lupin > lentil. Lipid content of faba bean and lentil was about 1.2% and that of narrow-leafed lupin about 5.5%, and fatty acid composition was largely oleic and linoleic in all three species.
Both lentil and narrow-leafed lupin can be added to the range of feed and food crops produced at high latitudes in Europe. While faba bean produces the greatest protein yield and lysine concentration, the higher sulfur amino acid concentration in lupin, its oil content and its adaptation to acid, sandy soils not suitable for faba bean make it an attractive alternative.
PubMed ID
25242296 View in PubMed
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Sewerage and sewage disposal in cold regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297301
Source
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. Cold Regions Science and Engineering Monograph III-C5b.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1969
greatly diminished. "Serving high-quality food is regarded as essential in maintaining 'good morale,' as is the provisiOIi of flush toilets at the more isolated stations such as Byrd and Pole. (Most of those stationed at McMurdo, the largest U.S. post, are still con- signed to using less-sophisticated
  1 document  
Author
Alter, Amos J.
Source
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. Cold Regions Science and Engineering Monograph III-C5b.
Date
October 1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9567986
Keywords
Alaska
Sewage
Waste disposal
Permafrost
Climate
Vegetation
Ice
Snow
Abstract
This manual is an updated revision of Arctic Sanitary Engineering - Sewage DisposaP by' the sallltiAuthor.Almost twenty years have elapsed since its initial preparation and the subject matter has been expanded extensively.
Documents

Sewerage-and-Sewage-Disposal.pdf

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13 records – page 1 of 1.