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The Canadian elder standard - pricing the cost of basic needs for the Canadian elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145075
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Mar;29(1):39-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald
Doug Andrews
Robert L Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. BonnieJeanne_MacDonald@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Mar;29(1):39-56
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Income Tax
Male
Needs Assessment - economics
Poverty - classification
Retirement
Social Security - economics
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
We determined the after-tax income required to finance basic needs for Canadian elders living with different circumstances in terms of age, gender, city of residence, household size, homeowner or renter status, means of transportation, and health status. Using 2001 as our base year, we priced the typical expenses for food, shelter, medical, transportation, miscellaneous basic living items and home-based long-term care for elders living in five Canadian cities. This is the first Canadian study of basic living expenses tailored to elders instead of adults in general, prepared on an absolute rather than a relative basis. We also accounted for an individual's unique life circumstances and established the varying effect that they have on the cost of basic expenses, particularly for home care. We found that the maximum Guaranteed Income Supplement and Old Age Security benefit did not meet the cost of basic needs for an elder living in poor circumstances.
PubMed ID
20202264 View in PubMed
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Economic abuse and intra-household inequities in food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168387
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elaine M Power
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Program, School of Physical and Health Education, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. power@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Public Assistance
Public Health - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - economics
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Food insecurity affected over 2.3 million Canadians in 2004. To date, the food security literature has not considered the potential impact of economic abuse on food security, but there are three ways in which these two important public health issues may be related: 1) victims of economic abuse are at risk of food insecurity when they are denied access to adequate financial resources; 2) the conditions that give rise to food insecurity may also precipitate intimate partner violence in all its forms; 3) women who leave economically abusive intimate heterosexual relationships are more likely to live in poverty and thus are at risk of food insecurity. This paper presents a case of one woman who, during a qualitative research interview, spontaneously reported economic abuse and heterosexual interpersonal violence. The economic abuse suffered by this participant appears to have affected her food security and that of her children, while her husband's was apparently unaffected. There is an urgent need to better understand the nature of intra-household food distribution in food-insecure households and the impact of economic abuse on its victims' food security. Such an understanding may lead to improved food security measurement tools and social policies to reduce food insecurity.
PubMed ID
16827421 View in PubMed
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Putting food on the public health table: Making food security relevant to regional health authorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168392
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):233-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen Rideout
Barbara Seed
Aleck Ostry
Author Affiliation
Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):233-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - standards
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Models, organizational
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health - trends
Regional Health Planning - methods
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Food security is emerging as an increasingly important public health issue. The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual model and five classes of food security indicators for regional health authorities (RHAs): direct, indirect, consequence, process, and supra-regional. The model was developed after a review of the food security literature and interviews with British Columbia community nutritionists and public health officials. We offer this conceptual model as a practical tool to help RHAs develop a comprehensive framework and use specific indicators, in conjunction with public health nutritionists and other community stakeholders. We recommend using all five classes of indicator together to ensure a complete assessment of the full breadth of food security. This model will be useful for Canadian health authorities wishing to take a holistic community-based approach to public health nutrition to develop more effective policies and programs to maximize food security. The model and indicators offer a rational process that could be useful for collaborative multi-stakeholder initiatives to improve food security.
PubMed ID
16827415 View in PubMed
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Assessing health care in Canada's North: what can we learn from national and regional surveys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264982
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28436
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
much less, and nurses much more often, than non-Aboriginal people in the North (21), Table IV. Coverage of measures of health determinants in selected surveys APS RHS Content CCHS 2001 2006 2012 2002/03 2008/10 Socio-economic status Education Employment Income Housing Food security Obesity
  1 document  
Author
T Kue Young
Carmina Ng
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28436
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
975329
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Care Surveys/methods
Humans
Male
Northwest Territories
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health surveys are a rich source of information on a variety of health issues, including health care.
This article compares various national and regional surveys in terms of their geographical coverage with respect to the Canadian North, especially their Aboriginal population, and the comparability of the survey contents relating to health care.
Three surveys were selected as providing some information on health care, with separate estimates for the North and its Aboriginal populations. They are the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS).
Different surveys focus on different categories of Aboriginal people, and no single survey has covered all categories of Aboriginal people in the North consistently. RHS is targeted at the on-reserve First Nations population only. APS and CCHS sample the off-reserve First Nations population as well as Métis and Inuit. To achieve adequate sample size for North-South comparisons and comparisons among Aboriginal groups within the North, several cycles of the biennial/annual CCHS can be merged, producing a large data set with consistent coverage of topics using comparable questions. The content areas of the 3 surveys can be broadly categorized as health status, health determinants and health care. Substantial variation exists across surveys in the domains covered. There are also changes over time in terms of definitions, questions and even basic concepts. The available health care content of the 3 surveys focus on access to different types of health services, contact with different categories of health professionals, unmet health needs and the use of preventive services. Many important dimensions of health care are not covered. Not all these basic indicators are available for the North or its Aboriginal populations.
A comprehensive survey of health care in the North with sufficient sample size to provide reliable estimates for its subpopulations - urban and remote, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, and First Nations, Inuit and Métis - would provide useful information to decision-makers and service providers. Analytical studies can also be conducted to investigate the correlations and interactions among health status, health determinants and health care and assess whether such relationships differ among the different population groups.
PubMed ID
26214103 View in PubMed
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Barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity for First Nation youths in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82158
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Skinner Kelly
Hanning Rhona M
Tsuji Leonard J S
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
Diet - economics - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity in youths in a remote sub-arctic community, Fort Albany First Nation, Ontario, Canada. STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative multi-method participatory approach. METHODS: The study included a purposive convenience sample of two adult (n = 22) and three youths (n = 30; students in grades 6 to 8) focus groups, unstructured one-on-one interviews with adult key informants (n = 7), and a scan of the community environment. Data were coded and analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Hurricane thinking and concept mapping were used to illustrate findings and relationships between concepts. RESULTS: Dominant emerging themes included empowerment, trust, resources, barriers and opportunities, while major sub-themes included food security, cost, accessibility/availability, capacity building, community support, programs/training and the school snack/breakfast program. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous barriers to healthy nutrition and physical activity exist in this community and are possibly similar in other remote communities. Empowerment is a core issue that should be considered in the design of public health interventions for First Nations youths in remote sub-arctic communities.
PubMed ID
16711466 View in PubMed
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Women's health in northern British Columbia: The role of geography and gender

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101164
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Publication Type
Article
Date
Autumn-2005
working, and able to live off the land.21 These attributes survive in the north today. Casey, a ranch woman in the study, noted that women are still expected to carry on the tradition of living off the land by having large gardens and canning and pre- serving food. Other historical elements include a
  1 document  
Author
Leipert, BD
Reutter, L
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontartio
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Date
Autumn-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
224568
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Determinants of health
Gender
Physical environment
Political environment
Social environments
Sociocultural environment
Women
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Although research interest in women's health is growing, much of the literature does not sufficiently describe the importance of geography and gender for the health of women. This qualitative study explored factors in the northern Canadian context that influence women's health by interviewing 25 women in northern Canada.RESULTS: Findings reveal that the importance of the northern context for women's health can be attributed to the north's historical location, and its physical, sociocultural and political environments. The northern context contributes to the marginalization of northern women that is characterized by isolation, limited options, limited power and being silenced.CONCLUSION: Health care practice and policy must attend to contextual as well as individual and sociocultural factors if women's health is to be advanced in northern settings.
PubMed ID
16356385 View in PubMed
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Canada's northern food subsidy Nutrition North Canada: a comprehensive program evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290437
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Tracey Galloway
Author Affiliation
a Department of Anthropology , University of Toronto Mississauga , Mississauga , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Commerce
Eligibility Determination
Food Assistance - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Nutrition North Canada (NNC) is a retail subsidy program implemented in 2012 and designed to reduce the cost of nutritious food for residents living in Canada's remote, northern communities. The present study evaluates the extent to which NNC provides access to perishable, nutritious food for residents of remote northern communities.
Program documents, including fiscal and food cost reports for the period 2011-2015, retailer compliance reports, audits of the program, and the program's performance measurement strategy are examined for evidence that the subsidy is meeting its objectives in a manner both comprehensive and equitable across regions and communities.
NNC lacks price caps or other means of ensuring food is affordable and equitably priced in communities. Gaps in food cost reporting constrain the program's accountability. From 2011-15, no adjustments were made to community eligibility, subsidy rates, or the list of eligible foods in response to information provided by community members, critics, the Auditor General of Canada, and the program's own Advisory Board. Measures to increase program accountability, such as increasing subsidy information on point-of-sale receipts, make NNC more visible but do nothing to address underlying accountability issues Conclusions: The current structure and regulatory framework of NNC are insufficient to ensure the program meets its goal. Both the volume and cost of nutritious food delivered to communities is highly variable and dependent on factors such as retailers' pricing practices, over which the program has no control. It may be necessary to consider alternative forms of policy in order to produce sustainable improvements to food security in remote, northern communities.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jul 05;75:31127 PMID 27388896
PubMed ID
28151097 View in PubMed
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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Exploring food security with collective kitchens participants in three Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166067
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Shawna Berenbaum
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooking - standards
Diet - standards
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Social Welfare
Abstract
Collective kitchens are small groups of people who pool their resources to cook large quantities of food. With the help of semi-participant observation and in-depth individual interviews, this study is an exploration of participants' perceptions of changes in food security since becoming involved in a collective kitchen. Several important themes emerged, including Increased Variety, Making Ends Meet, and Comparisons to Food Banks. Participants in groups that cooked large quantities of food (upwards of five meals monthly) reported some increases in their food resources. Participants also reported increased dignity associated with not having to access charitable resources to feed their families. Some participants reported decreased psychological distress associated with food insecurity. Overall, participants reported increases in food security; however, collective kitchens are not a long-term solution to the income-related food insecurity experienced by many Canadian families.
PubMed ID
17170245 View in PubMed
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An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
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Do healthy food baskets assess food security?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183764
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tasnim Nathoo
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, James Mather Building, 5804 Fairview Avenue, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. tasmin@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ecology - methods
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Population Surveillance - methods
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Developing indicators to measure the different facets of food security presents numerous conceptual and methodological challenges. This paper adopts an ecological framework to reflect on these issues through an examination of the Healthy Food Basket (HFB) tool. The HFB tool is used to measure food security conditions by determining the cost and availability of a group of foods in a shopping basket across a range of stores in different regions and neighbourhoods. The paper discusses the ability of the HFB tool to describe micro-, meso- and macro-level influences on food security and the use of the ecological model in developing complementary and alternative strategies for understanding and monitoring food security.
PubMed ID
12959676 View in PubMed
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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
coastal communi- ties scattered across approxi- mately 31% of the country’s landmass (Figure 1), numerous health implications from climate change have already been docu- mented, including the effects on personal safety, food and water security, and mental health.6 Changing temperature and pre- cipitation
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
924997
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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Determinants of change in fat consumption patterns in Nain, Newfoundland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256652
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
and possible to ensure food security for future generations. To build this tool, in July 2008, g focus groups were conducted with participants 14-70 years of age (23 women, 26 men). 78o/o participated in harvesting activities. Preliminary results indicate that participants have noticed changes in
  1 document  
Author
Bernier S
Furgal C
Winters K
Dewailly E
The Nunatsiavut Government
Author Affiliation
Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Inuit
Food
Fat consumption
Canada
Newfoundland
Nutrition
Health
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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An assessment of dietary intake in an Inuvialuit population to highlight foods for a nutritional intervention program to improve dietary intake: Results from health foods north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256654
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
AN ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY INTAKE IN AN INUVIALUIT POPULATION TO HIGHLIGHT FOODS FOR A NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM TO IMPROVE DIETARY INTAKE, RES UL TS FROM HEAL TH FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, E. De Roose, X. Cao, J. Gittelsohn, A. Corriveau University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  1 document  
Author
Shama S
DeRoose E
Cao X
Gittelsohn J
Corriveau A
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Dietary intake
Food
Nutrition
Inuvialuit
Adults
Canada
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Food and nutrient intake of Inuit adults and the development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to evaluate a nutritional and lifestyle intervention program aimed at improving dietary intake and health: Results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256655
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF INUIT ADULTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE TO EVALUATE A NUTRITIONAL AND LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION PROGRAM AIMED AT IMPROVING DIETARY INTAKE AND HEAL TH, RES UL TS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, X. Cao, C. Roache, R. Reid, J
  1 document  
Author
Sharma S
Cao X
Roache C
Reid R
Gittelsohn J
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Inuit
Canada
Energy
Vitamins
Nutrition
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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The prevalence of food insecurity is high and the diet quality poor in Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127113
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Catherine Huet
Renata Rosol
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nunavut
Poverty Areas
Abstract
Indigenous peoples experience a disproportionate burden of food insecurity and the Arctic is no exception. We therefore evaluated the prevalence, socio-demographic, and dietary correlates of food insecurity in the most comprehensive assessment of food insecurity in Arctic Canada. A cross-sectional survey of 1901 Inuit households was conducted in 2007-2008. Measurements included food insecurity, 24-h dietary recalls, socio-demographics, and anthropometry. Food insecurity was identified in 62.6% of households (95% CI = 60.3-64.9%) with 27.2% (95% CI = 25.1-29.3%) of households severely food insecure. The percent with an elevated BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat was lower among individuals from food insecure households compared to food secure households (P = 0.001). Adults from food insecure households had a significantly lower Healthy Eating Index score and consumed fewer vegetables and fruit, grains, and dairy products, and consumed a greater percent of energy from high-sugar foods than adults from food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity was associated with household crowding, income support, public housing, single adult households, and having a home in need of major repairs (P = 0.05). The prevalence of having an active hunter in the home was lower in food insecure compared to food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity prevalence is high in Inuit communities, with implications for diet quality that over the long-term would be anticipated to exacerbate the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. Actions are required to improve food security that incorporate the traditional food system and healthy market food choices.
PubMed ID
22323760 View in PubMed
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Geographic and socio-demographic predictors of household food insecurity in Canada, 2011-12.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298422
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 03; 19(1):12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-03-2019
Author
Valerie Tarasuk
Andrée-Anne Fafard St-Germain
Andrew Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A8, Canada. valerie.tarasuk@utoronto.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 03; 19(1):12
Date
Jan-03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Geography
Humans
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Household food insecurity is a potent social determinant of health and health care costs in Canada, but understanding of the social and economic conditions that underlie households' vulnerability to food insecurity is limited.
Data from the 2011-12 Canadian Community Health Survey were used to determine predictors of household food insecurity among a nationally-representative sample of 120,909 households. Household food insecurity over the past 12?months was assessed using the 18-item Household Food Security Survey Module. Households were classified as food secure or marginally, moderately, or severely food insecure based on the number of affirmative responses. Multivariable binary and multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to determine geographic and socio-demographic predictors of presence and severity of household food insecurity.
The prevalence of household food insecurity ranged from 11.8% in Ontario to 41.0% in Nunavut. After adjusting for socio-demographic factors, households' odds of food insecurity were lower in Quebec and higher in the Maritimes, territories, and Alberta, compared to Ontario. The adjusted odds of food insecurity were also higher among households reliant on social assistance, Employment Insurance or workers' compensation, those without a university degree, those with children under 18, unattached individuals, renters, and those with an Aboriginal respondent. Higher income, immigration, and reliance on seniors' income sources were protective against food insecurity. Living in Nunavut and relying on social assistance were the strongest predictors of severe food insecurity, but severity was also associated with income, education, household composition, Aboriginal status, immigration status, and place of residence. The relation between income and food insecurity status was graded, with every $1000 increase in income associated with 2% lower odds of marginal food insecurity, 4% lower odds of moderate food insecurity, and 5% lower odds of severe food insecurity.
The probability of household food insecurity in Canada and the severity of the experience depends on a household's province or territory of residence, income, main source of income, housing tenure, education, Aboriginal status, and household structure. Our findings highlight the intersection of household food insecurity with public policy decisions in Canada and the disproportionate burden of food insecurity among Indigenous peoples.
PubMed ID
30606152 View in PubMed
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Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
January 2011
)  Income distributionIncome distribution  HousingHousing  EducationEducation  Social safety netsSocial safety nets  EnvironmentEnvironment  AddictionsAddictions  Health care servicesHealth care services  Food security and Food security and NutritionNutrition
  1 document  
Author
Alvarez, Gonzalo G
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor of Medicine,
Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Date
January 2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3162116
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inuit
Pulmonary
Health
Research
Cancer
Statistics
Tuberculosis
Health Care Access
Documents

Alvarez-Inuit-pulmonary-health-Jan--2011.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
environmental security of the Alas- k a n I n u i t c o a s t l i n e d e p e n d e d “ u p o n t h e s t r e n g t h o f ( s e l f ) government in Canada and Greenland”, and only when we all have our own home rule governments, “will we be able to really trust any offshore operation in the Beaufort
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3181838
Keywords
Canada
Inuit
Environment
Wildlife & harvesting
Research & health activities
Human Rights
Documents

06-07_annual_report_lenglish.pdf

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Breaking down colonial borders in Inuit Nunaat through education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294489
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
May 2017
Western food they were provided at Eklutna, so she fought to have Native food once a week for the students. She helped greatly to alleviate students’ homesickness (Blackman 1989, 100-104). Brower Neakok then went on to study at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where she trained for two
  1 document  
Author
Rudolph, Angela Nuliayok
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Date
May 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
5410017
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Tradition learning
History
Canada
Nunavut
Alaska
Documents

Angela-Nuliayok-Rudolph_Breacking-Down-Colonial-Borders.pdf

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