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Canada's northern food subsidy Nutrition North Canada: a comprehensive program evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290437
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Tracey Galloway
Author Affiliation
a Department of Anthropology , University of Toronto Mississauga , Mississauga , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Commerce
Eligibility Determination
Food Assistance - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Nutrition North Canada (NNC) is a retail subsidy program implemented in 2012 and designed to reduce the cost of nutritious food for residents living in Canada's remote, northern communities. The present study evaluates the extent to which NNC provides access to perishable, nutritious food for residents of remote northern communities.
Program documents, including fiscal and food cost reports for the period 2011-2015, retailer compliance reports, audits of the program, and the program's performance measurement strategy are examined for evidence that the subsidy is meeting its objectives in a manner both comprehensive and equitable across regions and communities.
NNC lacks price caps or other means of ensuring food is affordable and equitably priced in communities. Gaps in food cost reporting constrain the program's accountability. From 2011-15, no adjustments were made to community eligibility, subsidy rates, or the list of eligible foods in response to information provided by community members, critics, the Auditor General of Canada, and the program's own Advisory Board. Measures to increase program accountability, such as increasing subsidy information on point-of-sale receipts, make NNC more visible but do nothing to address underlying accountability issues Conclusions: The current structure and regulatory framework of NNC are insufficient to ensure the program meets its goal. Both the volume and cost of nutritious food delivered to communities is highly variable and dependent on factors such as retailers' pricing practices, over which the program has no control. It may be necessary to consider alternative forms of policy in order to produce sustainable improvements to food security in remote, northern communities.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jul 05;75:31127 PMID 27388896
PubMed ID
28151097 View in PubMed
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Barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity for First Nation youths in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82158
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Skinner Kelly
Hanning Rhona M
Tsuji Leonard J S
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
Diet - economics - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity in youths in a remote sub-arctic community, Fort Albany First Nation, Ontario, Canada. STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative multi-method participatory approach. METHODS: The study included a purposive convenience sample of two adult (n = 22) and three youths (n = 30; students in grades 6 to 8) focus groups, unstructured one-on-one interviews with adult key informants (n = 7), and a scan of the community environment. Data were coded and analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Hurricane thinking and concept mapping were used to illustrate findings and relationships between concepts. RESULTS: Dominant emerging themes included empowerment, trust, resources, barriers and opportunities, while major sub-themes included food security, cost, accessibility/availability, capacity building, community support, programs/training and the school snack/breakfast program. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous barriers to healthy nutrition and physical activity exist in this community and are possibly similar in other remote communities. Empowerment is a core issue that should be considered in the design of public health interventions for First Nations youths in remote sub-arctic communities.
PubMed ID
16711466 View in PubMed
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Determinants of change in fat consumption patterns in Nain, Newfoundland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256652
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
and possible to ensure food security for future generations. To build this tool, in July 2008, g focus groups were conducted with participants 14-70 years of age (23 women, 26 men). 78o/o participated in harvesting activities. Preliminary results indicate that participants have noticed changes in
  1 document  
Author
Bernier S
Furgal C
Winters K
Dewailly E
The Nunatsiavut Government
Author Affiliation
Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Inuit
Food
Fat consumption
Canada
Newfoundland
Nutrition
Health
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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An assessment of dietary intake in an Inuvialuit population to highlight foods for a nutritional intervention program to improve dietary intake: Results from health foods north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256654
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
AN ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY INTAKE IN AN INUVIALUIT POPULATION TO HIGHLIGHT FOODS FOR A NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM TO IMPROVE DIETARY INTAKE, RES UL TS FROM HEAL TH FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, E. De Roose, X. Cao, J. Gittelsohn, A. Corriveau University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  1 document  
Author
Shama S
DeRoose E
Cao X
Gittelsohn J
Corriveau A
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Dietary intake
Food
Nutrition
Inuvialuit
Adults
Canada
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Food and nutrient intake of Inuit adults and the development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to evaluate a nutritional and lifestyle intervention program aimed at improving dietary intake and health: Results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256655
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF INUIT ADULTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE TO EVALUATE A NUTRITIONAL AND LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION PROGRAM AIMED AT IMPROVING DIETARY INTAKE AND HEAL TH, RES UL TS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, X. Cao, C. Roache, R. Reid, J
  1 document  
Author
Sharma S
Cao X
Roache C
Reid R
Gittelsohn J
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Inuit
Canada
Energy
Vitamins
Nutrition
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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The prevalence of food insecurity is high and the diet quality poor in Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127113
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Catherine Huet
Renata Rosol
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nunavut
Poverty Areas
Abstract
Indigenous peoples experience a disproportionate burden of food insecurity and the Arctic is no exception. We therefore evaluated the prevalence, socio-demographic, and dietary correlates of food insecurity in the most comprehensive assessment of food insecurity in Arctic Canada. A cross-sectional survey of 1901 Inuit households was conducted in 2007-2008. Measurements included food insecurity, 24-h dietary recalls, socio-demographics, and anthropometry. Food insecurity was identified in 62.6% of households (95% CI = 60.3-64.9%) with 27.2% (95% CI = 25.1-29.3%) of households severely food insecure. The percent with an elevated BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat was lower among individuals from food insecure households compared to food secure households (P = 0.001). Adults from food insecure households had a significantly lower Healthy Eating Index score and consumed fewer vegetables and fruit, grains, and dairy products, and consumed a greater percent of energy from high-sugar foods than adults from food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity was associated with household crowding, income support, public housing, single adult households, and having a home in need of major repairs (P = 0.05). The prevalence of having an active hunter in the home was lower in food insecure compared to food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity prevalence is high in Inuit communities, with implications for diet quality that over the long-term would be anticipated to exacerbate the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. Actions are required to improve food security that incorporate the traditional food system and healthy market food choices.
PubMed ID
22323760 View in PubMed
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Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
January 2011
)  Income distributionIncome distribution  HousingHousing  EducationEducation  Social safety netsSocial safety nets  EnvironmentEnvironment  AddictionsAddictions  Health care servicesHealth care services  Food security and Food security and NutritionNutrition
  1 document  
Author
Alvarez, Gonzalo G
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor of Medicine,
Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Date
January 2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3162116
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inuit
Pulmonary
Health
Research
Cancer
Statistics
Tuberculosis
Health Care Access
Documents

Alvarez-Inuit-pulmonary-health-Jan--2011.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
environmental security of the Alas- k a n I n u i t c o a s t l i n e d e p e n d e d “ u p o n t h e s t r e n g t h o f ( s e l f ) government in Canada and Greenland”, and only when we all have our own home rule governments, “will we be able to really trust any offshore operation in the Beaufort
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3181838
Keywords
Canada
Inuit
Environment
Wildlife & harvesting
Research & health activities
Human Rights
Documents

06-07_annual_report_lenglish.pdf

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Breaking down colonial borders in Inuit Nunaat through education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294489
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
May 2017
Western food they were provided at Eklutna, so she fought to have Native food once a week for the students. She helped greatly to alleviate students’ homesickness (Blackman 1989, 100-104). Brower Neakok then went on to study at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where she trained for two
  1 document  
Author
Rudolph, Angela Nuliayok
Source
The Gordon Foundation and The Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship. 19 p.
Date
May 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
5410017
Keywords
Inuit
Education
Tradition learning
History
Canada
Nunavut
Alaska
Documents

Angela-Nuliayok-Rudolph_Breacking-Down-Colonial-Borders.pdf

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Health professionals working with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis consensus guideline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294755
Source
JOGC, Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada. June 2013. V.35, no.6. suppl. 2.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
. (III) 09 . Eating traditional country foods helps to preserve cultural identity, but increasing environmental contaminants such as lead, arsenic, mercury, and persistent organic pollutants may compromise food safety . (II-3) 10 . Given demographic shifts such as rapidly growing populations with
  1 document  
Author
Don Wilson
Sandra de la Ronde
Simon Brascoupé
Alisha Nicole Apale
Lucy Barney
Bing Guthrie
Elizabeth Harrold
Ojistoh Horn
Robin Johnson
Darrien Rattray
Nicole Robinson
Natsiq Alainga-Kango
Gisela Becker
Vyta Senikas
Annie Aningmiuq
Geri Bailey
Darlene Birch
Katsi Cook
Jessica Danforth
Mary Daoust
Darlene Kitty
Jaime Koebel
Judith Kornelsen
Ndakaitedzva Tsatsa Kotwas
Audrey Lawrence
Amanda Mudry
Gail Theresa Turner
Vicki Van Wagner
Eduardo Vides
Fjola Hart Wasekeesikaw
Sara Wolfe
Source
JOGC, Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada. June 2013. V.35, no.6. suppl. 2.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1059176
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health
Personnel
Health services
Humans
Inuit
Indigenous
Aboriginal
First Nation
Metis
Social Determinants of Health
Maternal/child
Health inequity
Culturally-safe care
Cultural competence
Delivery
Life-cycle
Traditional practices
Rural Health
Reproduction
Notes
Chapter 1: Definitions. Chapter 2: Demographics. Chapter 3: Social Determinants of Health Among First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. Chapter 4: Health Systems, Policies, and Services for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. Chapter 5: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health. Chapter 6: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Maternal Health. Chapter 7: Mature Women’s Health . Chapter 8: Changing Outcomes Through Culturally Competent Care. Chapter 9: Conclusion. Chapter 10: Case Studies . Appendix.
Documents

June-JOGC-2013-CPG293_Supplement_Eng_Online-Final_NO-cropmarks_REV-F.pdf

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"We are not being heard": Aboriginal perspectives on traditional foods access and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116942
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bethany Elliott
Deepthi Jayatilaka
Contessa Brown
Leslie Varley
Kitty K Corbett
Author Affiliation
Population and Public Health, Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bethany.elliott@phsa.ca
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:130945
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Focus Groups
Food
Food Supply
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Population Groups
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.
Notes
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1504-1119144239
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-915622799
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
PubMed ID
23346118 View in PubMed
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Development of a strategic plan for food security and safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261813
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73:25091
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Myriam Fillion
Brian Laird
Vasiliki Douglas
Linda Van Pelt
Diane Archie
Hing Man Chan
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73:25091
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education - organization & administration
Female
Food Supply - methods
Health Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Northwest Territories
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Safety
Abstract
Current social and environmental changes in the Arctic challenge the health and well-being of its residents. Developing evidence-informed adaptive measures in response to these changes is a priority for communities, governments and researchers.
To develop strategic planning to promote food security and food safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada.
A qualitative study using group discussions during a workshop.
A regional workshop gathered Inuit organizations and community representatives, university-based researchers from the Inuit Health Survey (IHS) and NWT governmental organizations. Discussions were structured around the findings from the IHS. For each key area, programs and activities were identified and prioritized by group discussion and voting.
The working group developed a vision for future research and intervention, which is to empower communities to promote health, well-being and environmental sustainability in the ISR. The group elaborated missions for the region that address the following issues: (a) capacity building within communities; (b) promotion of the use of traditional foods to address food security; (c) research to better understand the linkages between diseases and contaminants in traditional foods, market foods and lifestyle choices; (d) and promotion of affordable housing. Five programs to address each key area were developed as follows: harvest support and traditional food sharing; education and promotion; governance and policy; research; and housing. Concrete activities were identified to guide future research and intervention projects.
The results of the planning workshop provide a blueprint for future research and intervention projects.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v71i0.1975223166895
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1869822765938
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):444-622208993
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-722323760
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998 Oct;57(4):280-919857584
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-5321753059
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Oct 15;408(22):5165-23420728918
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):137020568912
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:165-24616297438
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):488-9722005728
PubMed ID
25147772 View in PubMed
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Maintaining population health in a period of welfare state decline: political economy as the missing dimension in health promotion theory and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164270
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(4):236-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Dennis Raphael
Toba Bryant
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada. draphael@yorku.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(4):236-42
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health promotion
Humans
Models, Theoretical
National Health Programs
Politics
Public Health
Public Policy
Social Environment
Social Welfare
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
There is increasing recognition in the health promotion and population health fields that the primary determinants of health lay outside the health care and behavioural risk arenas. Many of these factors involve public policy decisions made by governments that influence the distribution of income, degree of social security, and quality and availability of education, food, and housing, among others. These non-medical and non-lifestyle factors have come to be known as the social determinants of health. In many nations--and this is especially the case in North America--recent policy decisions are undermining these social determinants of health. A political economy analysis of the forces supporting as well as threatening the welfare state is offered as a means of both understanding these policy decisions and advancing the health promotion and population health agendas. The building blocks of social democracies--the political systems that seem most amenable to securing the social determinants of health--are identified as key to promoting health. Health promoters and population health researchers need to "get political" and recognize the importance of political and social action in support of health.
PubMed ID
17410974 View in PubMed
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Bringing home the right to food in Canada: challenges and possibilities for achieving food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164472
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Karen Rideout
Graham Riches
Aleck Ostry
Don Buckingham
Rod MacRae
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 main mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 124. krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Food Supply - standards
Human Rights - standards
Humans
International Cooperation
Nutrition Policy
Politics
Relief Work
Social Responsibility
Abstract
We offer a critique of Canada's approach to domestic food security with respect to international agreements, justiciability and case law, the breakdown of the public safety net, the institutionalisation of charitable approaches to food insecurity, and the need for 'joined-up' food and nutrition policies. We examined Canada's commitments to the right to food, as well as Canadian policies, case law and social trends, in order to assess Canada's performance with respect to the human right to food. We found that while Canada has been a leader in signing international human rights agreements, including those relating to the right to food, domestic action has lagged and food insecurity increased. We provide recommendations for policy changes that could deal with complex issues of state accountability, social safety nets and vulnerable populations, and joined-up policy frameworks that could help realise the right to adequate food in Canada and other developed nations.
PubMed ID
17381908 View in PubMed
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Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165008
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Hing Man Chan
Karen Fediuk
Sue Hamilton
Laura Rostas
Amy Caughey
Harriet Kuhnlein
Grace Egeland
Eric Loring
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Canada. lchan@unbc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The food supply of Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada, is characterized by market food of relatively low nutritional value and nutrient-dense traditional food. The objective of this study is to assess community perceptions about the availability and accessibility of traditional and market foods in Nunavut.
A qualitative study using focus group methodology.
Focus groups were conducted in 6 communities in Nunavut in 2004 and collected information was analyzed.
Barriers to increased traditional food consumption included high costs of hunting and changes in lifestyle and cultural practices. Participants suggested that food security could be gained through increased economic support for local community hunts, freezers and education programs, as well as better access to cheaper and higher quality market food.
Interventions to improve the dietary quality of Nunavut residents are discussed.
PubMed ID
17319086 View in PubMed
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Do healthy food baskets assess food security?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183764
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tasnim Nathoo
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, James Mather Building, 5804 Fairview Avenue, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. tasmin@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ecology - methods
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Population Surveillance - methods
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Developing indicators to measure the different facets of food security presents numerous conceptual and methodological challenges. This paper adopts an ecological framework to reflect on these issues through an examination of the Healthy Food Basket (HFB) tool. The HFB tool is used to measure food security conditions by determining the cost and availability of a group of foods in a shopping basket across a range of stores in different regions and neighbourhoods. The paper discusses the ability of the HFB tool to describe micro-, meso- and macro-level influences on food security and the use of the ecological model in developing complementary and alternative strategies for understanding and monitoring food security.
PubMed ID
12959676 View in PubMed
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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Exploring food security with collective kitchens participants in three Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166067
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Shawna Berenbaum
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooking - standards
Diet - standards
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Social Welfare
Abstract
Collective kitchens are small groups of people who pool their resources to cook large quantities of food. With the help of semi-participant observation and in-depth individual interviews, this study is an exploration of participants' perceptions of changes in food security since becoming involved in a collective kitchen. Several important themes emerged, including Increased Variety, Making Ends Meet, and Comparisons to Food Banks. Participants in groups that cooked large quantities of food (upwards of five meals monthly) reported some increases in their food resources. Participants also reported increased dignity associated with not having to access charitable resources to feed their families. Some participants reported decreased psychological distress associated with food insecurity. Overall, participants reported increases in food security; however, collective kitchens are not a long-term solution to the income-related food insecurity experienced by many Canadian families.
PubMed ID
17170245 View in PubMed
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An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
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