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The health condition in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2002: Causes of death and incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296241
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2005
to the health care services and the social security systems. Key words: Sami, Health, Epidemiology, Reindeer herder, Cardiovascular diseases, Cancer, Causes of death, Acculturation, Sweden ii ORIGINAL PAPERS This thesis is based on the following papers: I Hassler S, Johansson R, Sjölander
  1 document  
Author
Hassler, Sven
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
468671
Keywords
Sami
Health
Epidemiology
Reindeer herder
Cardiovascular diseases
Cancer
Causes of death
Acculturation
Sweden
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Mental health problems among the Swedish reindeer-herding Sami population in perspective of intersectionality, organisational culture and acculturation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296243
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations, New Series No 1430. Department of Clinical Sciences Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University. 67 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Kaiser, Niclas.
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations, New Series No 1430. Department of Clinical Sciences Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University. 67 p.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1189888
Keywords
Sami
Mental health
Sweden
Suicide
Prevention
Alcohol abuse
Depression
Anxiety
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Managing mountains, past and present conditions for traditional summer farming and Sami reindeer husbandry in northern Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295941
Source
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Umea : Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae 2017:80.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2017
grazing history. • Reindeer husbandry use very large areas with low intensity both in summer and winter, across most of the boreal part of Sweden. • Today minor food production but important as producers of cultural and biological values. • Continue to be important food producers and
  1 document  
Author
Linkowski, Weronika Izabella Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Forest Sciences, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Umeå
Source
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Umea : Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae 2017:80.
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
3416260
Keywords
Boreal forests
Traditional ecological knowledge
Historical perspective
Forest grazing
Transhumance
Carnivores
Land use changes
Pastoralism
Abstract
Traditional land use and conditions for maintenance of biodiversity are often interlinked. When land use changes and ecosystems change as a result, there is a risk to loose both the traditional ecological knowledge and the biodiversity connected to this land use. This thesis focuses on traditional land use, summer farming and Sami reindeer husbandry, in the mountain areas of northern Scandinavia (mainly Sweden), in a historical and contemporary perspective. The overall aim is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for the traditional land use in the Scandinavian (mainly Swedish) mountains, using the concepts of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and a historical-ecological perspective. Both summer farming and reindeer husbandry are under strong external pressure and face large challenges today. Some of these challenges are shared and some differ between the two types of northern pastoralism. Scandinavian summer farmers experience that different views on their land use from different authorities affect them negatively. The increasing populations of large carnivores also worry the summer farmers. Recent depredation rates are in fact of the same level as historically (around 1900). Interviews showed that traditional knowledge about protective measures had eroded during years without carnivores, but also that farming practices have changed recently and that new knowledge developed. Sami plant use has been studied historically, but information about Sami plant management of Angelica archangelica was not documented. We argue that Sami ecological knowledge should be used to ensure sustainable harvest methods. Today traditional reindeer husbandry faces severe problems due to the reduction of winter grazing land by different encroachments, most importantly from modern forestry. The negative effects are even larger since increasingly difficult winter conditions create a need for a wider range of good grazing areas. Traditional knowledge is essential in the herders´ daily work, but the usability of the knowledge is severely constrained by recent changes. In the future planning of an ecologically and socially sustainable mountain management it is necessary to work with traditional land users and integrate their traditional knowledge.
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axelsson_linkowski_w_170906.pdf

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Sami lifestyle and health : epidemiological studies from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295942
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2012
health 2 1.4 Epidemiology 5 1.5 Nutritional epidemiology. 6 1.6 Determinants of health 8 1.7 Diet in the Sami population 12 1.8 Overall perspective 15 2. Objectives 17 3. Materials and methods 19 3.1 Study population 19 3.2 Study design and study subjects 22 3.3 Food frequency questionnaire
  1 document  
Author
Nilsson, Lena Maria
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1806673
Keywords
Sami
Traditional diet
Traditional lifestyle
Cohort
Mortality
Cancer
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
The aim of this PhD thesis was to expand the current knowledge of “traditional Sami” diet and lifestyle, and to test aspects of the Sami diet and lifestyle, specifically dietary pattern, macronutrient distribution and coffee consumption, in population-based epidemiological studies of mortality and incident cardiovascular disease and cancer in a general population...
Notes
ISBN 978-91-7459-359-4
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Sami traditions: Márkomeannu's contribution to the revitalization of Sami food traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295943
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Autumn 2014
Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education Sami traditions: Márkomeannu´s contribution to the revitalization of Sami food traditions Elisabeth Berg Thesis submitted for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies November 2014 i SAMI TRADITIONS: MÁRKOMEANNU`S
  1 document  
Author
Berg, Elisabeth
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Date
Autumn 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
3175632
Keywords
Skånland
Sami
Traditional diet
Articulation
Revitalization
Globalization
Modernization
Abstract
This thesis focuses on the Márkomeannu festival’s contribution to the revitalization of food traditions. The study was conducted on the Márkomeannu festival in Skånland in Troms County, specifically in the Markasami areas in the rural hills of Skånland. The festival was chosen because it is an important arena for expression of indigeneity and culture. Many areas within the Sami community have suffered from assimilation and have afterwards gone through a process of revitalization. The process of revitalization of the culture, language, politics and history has been thoroughly studied and written about, but the revitalization of Sami traditional food has not been studied in detail. Food is an important cultural marker which works as building stones of each cultural foundation. Food can be both symbolic and be a purely practical necessity for a culture. The thesis establishes that some traditional dishes are adopted and adapted from international dishes. The results shows that traditional dishes are used to articulate the Sami culture, and that traditions can be adapted to a modern outlook, and also adapted to fit a Sami cultural profile. Márkomeannu as a cultural arena contributes to revitalization of food by creating a platform for cultural expression which can lead to a stronger Sami identity and a feeling of safety in expressing culture.
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Food customs of rural and urban Inupiaq elders and their relationships to select nutrition parameters, food insecurity, health, and physical and mental functioning

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274183
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2007
35.1 + 10.8 years with a range of 18-61 years………………...…………………………………… 55 2.2 Perceptions of the Quality of Life in Two Inupiaq North Slope Borough Communities ……………………………………………………………. 57 2.3 Food Security Rates for the General US Population …………………… 59 2.4 Comparison of Calorie and
  1 document  
Author
Smith, Janell
Author Affiliation
Florida International University
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1102377
Keywords
Alaska
Customs
Diet
Elders
Food
Inupiaq
Mental health
Native foods
Subsistence lifestyle
Abstract
The Inupiaq Tribe resides north of the Arctic Circle in northwestern Alaska. The people are characterized by their continued dependence on harvested fish, game and plants, known as a subsistence lifestyle (Lee 2000:35-45). Many are suggesting that they leave their historical home and move to urban communities, places believed to be more comfortable as they age. Tribal Elders disagree and have stated, "Elders need to be near the river where they were raised" (Branch 2005:1). The research questions focused on differences that location had on four groups of variables: nutrition parameters, community support, physical functioning and health. A total of 101 Inupiaq Elders ≥50 years were surveyed: 52 from two rural villages, and 49 in Anchorage. Location did not influence energy intake or intake of protein; levels of nutrition risk and food insecurity; all had similar rates between the two groups. Both rural and urban Elders reported few limitations of ADLs and IADLs. Self-reported general health scores (SF-12.v2 GH) were also similar by location. Differences were found with rural Elders reporting higher physical functioning summary scores (SF-12.v2 PCS), higher mental health scores (SF-12.v2 MH), higher vitality and less pain even though the rural mean ages were five years older than the urban Elders. Traditional food customs appear to support the overall health and well being of the rural Inupiaq Elders as demonstrated by higher intakes of Native foods, stronger food sharing networks and higher family activity scores than did urban Elders. The rural community appeared to foster continued physical activity. It has been said that when Elders are in the rural setting they are near "people they know" and it is a place "where they can get their Native food" (NRC 2005). These factors appear to be important as Inupiaq Elders age, as rural Inupiaq Elders fared as well or better than Inupiaq Elders in terms of diet, mental and physical health.
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JanellSmithDissertation.pdf

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Successful aging through the eyes of Alaska Native elders: What it means to be an elder in Bristol Bay, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274194
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Dec-2009
.......................................................................................................... 83� Supportive Community .............................................................................................. 88� Knowledge of Native Foods and Subsistence ............................................................ 90� Resilience and Community Sustainability
  1 document  
Author
Lewis, JP
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aging
Alaska Native
Bristol Bay
Community
Elders
Family
Resilience
Abstract
Alaska Natives view aging from a holistic perspective, an approach not typically found in the existing literature on successful aging. There is little research on Alaska Native (AN) Elders and how they subjectively define a successful older age. The lack of a culturally specific definition often results in the use of a generic definition that portrays AN Elders as aging less successfully than their non-Native counterparts. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an AN perspective and what it means to age well in AN communities. An Explanatory Model (EM) approach was used and adapted to focus on the health and well-being of AN Elders and to gain a sense of their beliefs about aging. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 26 Elders in six participating communities to explore the concept of successful aging and the role of their community in the aging process. Focus groups were held in specific communities to present the findings and receive feedback; this ensured the findings and report would be reflective of the unique perspectives of the communities and region. This study highlights four domains of successful aging, or "Eldership": emotion, spirituality, community engagement, and physical health. One aspect of successful aging seen in each of these four domains is optimism, or having a positive outlook on life. These four domains serve as the foundation of how communities define who is an Elder and what is important when considering whether someone has aged successfully or not. Research findings also indicate that aging successfully is based on local understandings about personal responsibility and making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life. Most Elders stated that Elder status is not determined by reaching a certain age (e.g., 65 years), but instead is designated when an individual has demonstrated wisdom because of the experiences he or she has gained throughout life. This research seeks to inform future studies on rural aging that will prioritize the perspectives of Elders to impact positively on the delivery of health care services and programs in rural Alaska.
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dissertation_lewis09.pdf

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Engaging Inupiaq values in land management for health through an action research appreciative inquiry process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294064
Source
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center: San Francisco, CA. April 2007.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2007
we have received that those who come after us may receive it more solid and secure, more widely accessible and more generously shared than we received it. (Attributed to John Dewey) When the wolf, the hunter of the tundra, knows that the caribou have moved too far or are too few, he will go to
  1 document  
Author
Hild CM
Source
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center: San Francisco, CA. April 2007.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1172267
Keywords
Alaska
Kotzebue
Tribal Doctor Program
Maniilaq Association
Abstract
The investigation identified organizational system processes, which allow indigenous cultural values to be formally incorporated into planning and sustainable caring of traditionally used landscapes that promote healing and well-being. This community-based participatory research was based on a two-year effort to identify research needs within the Maniilaq Association’s Tribal Doctor Program in Kotzebue, Alaska. Information was requested on the processes required to utilize places of ancient traditional healing (PATH) that are now on public lands managed by the federal government. Ernest T. Stringer’s community-based action research of 1999 was utilized to engage 27 stakeholders from 14 interest groups, which included six traditional healers and one Alaska Native medical doctor. Appreciative inquiry was employed to solicit information, insights, ideas, and innovations for how best to assure that a well-known place of ancient traditional healing can be used in a sustainable manner. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a naturalistic process after archival research and preliminary discussions yielded a foundation for the inquiry. Information was placed into a case dynamics matrix to assess thematic content. To provide for meaning-making, all participants reviewed all of the comments and provided their own written or oral interpretation of what was being said. These results were synthesized to include the multicultural worldviews of the participants through the use of their direct interpretations and recommendations for action. The participants told personal stories that reflected the contemporary spiritual and healing attributes of this ancient site. They repeatedly requested that its solitary and rustic nature be preserved. The primary indigenous values identified with the place are: respect for nature, spirituality, knowledge of the language, sharing, respect for elders, respect for others, and cooperation. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) provides for traditional cultural practices to be discussed under formal agreements with tribal bodies and the federal government. The process being proposed for future application is the one used within this dissertation: Multicultural Engagement for Learning and Understanding (MELU) through action research and the use of appreciative inquiry. To assure the sustainable utilization of these PATH the process must employ geopiety, a respect for the natural healing quality of place.
Notes
A dissertation presented to the Faculty of Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Organizational Systems.
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Health and Wellbeing in the Arctic: The Critical Issues of Food Insecurity and Suicide Among Indigenous people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296454
Source
Social Humanities and Social Sciences University of Akureyri, Iceland
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
August 2018
-being, food security/insecurity, mental health, suicide iv Þakkarorð Þessi ritgerð er lokaverkefni mitt til BA gráðu í félagsvísindum við Háskólann á Akureyri þar sem ég hafði málefni Norðurslóða sem áherslusvið. Ég vil fyrst þakka leiðbeinanda mínum Jóni Hauki
  1 document  
Author
Smáradóttir, Sveinbjörg
Author Affiliation
Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Sciences
Source
Social Humanities and Social Sciences University of Akureyri, Iceland
Date
August 2018
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
451032
Keywords
Arctic
Indigenous peoples
Health and welfare
Food insecurity
Spiritual health
Suicide
Abstract
Frumbyggjar Norðurslóða eru almennt við verri heilsu en aðrir íbúar svæðisins. Síðan afkomendur Evrópubúa hófu að leggja undir sig heimalönd frumbyggjanna, og fram á síðari hluta 20. aldar, gengu þeir í gegnum átakamiklar félagslegar- og efnahagslegar umbyltingar, voru neyddir til að yfirgefa heimalönd sín, samlagast og „nútímavæðast“ vestrænni menningu með alvarlegum afleiðingum fyrir heilsu þeirra og velferð. Í þessari ritgerð er fjallað um tvo mikilvæga þætti er varða heilsu og velferð frumbyggja á Norðurslóðum. Annarsvegar er það fæðu-óöryggi, orsakir og afleiðingar, og sambandið milli hefðbundinnar fæðu og leiða til fæðuöflunar og „vestræns“ mataræðis. Hinsvegar er fjallað andlega heilsu frumbyggjanna, með sérstaka áherslu á sjálfsvíg, orsakir og afleiðingar, hvernig þau tengjast atburðum og áföllum fortíðar og er viðhaldið af áskorunum sem frumbyggjarnir standa frammi fyrir í dag.
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Source
Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
......................................................................................................... 144 5.3 Military and security in the Arctic .......................................................................... 149 5.3.1 Military presence in the Arctic ........................................................................ 149 5.3.2 Human security
  1 document  
Source
Univerza v Ljunljana. Fakulteta za Druzbene Vede. 241 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2025863
Keywords
Sami
Parliaments
Arctic
Governance
Arctic Council
Fishing
Reindeer herding
Land rights
Mining
Climate change
Abstract
This Master's Thesis discusses two phenomena: the Sami people and the Arctic. The Sami are indigenous populations of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Federation. The Sami are a single people living in the four different countries, where they strive for their non-territorial autonomy. The main channels for their political influence are the Sami Parliaments on the respective nation states, while in Russia have very limited legal means for their political participation and influencing their position. The Arctic is the northernmost part of the World; it is the huge ocean mostly covered with ice, surrounded by land. It is the Sami peoples' homeland. The littoral states, the United States of America, Canada, the Russian Federation, Norway, and Greenland (Denmark) with Iceland, Sweden and Finland formed the Arctic Council have, the main intergovernmental and supranational organization in the Arctic, where major decisions are adopted. The Arctic is rich in natural resources and extractive industries are influencing both the peoples and environment of the Arctic. Global warming rapidly changes the face of the Arctic, while over-exploitation endangers the indigenous peoples and biodiversity.
The first part of the master thesis presents the Sami people, their history, political organization, legal regulation and protection of the Sami people, their everyday lives and the ongoing changes taking place in the Arctic. The second part presents the results of the survey among the Sami people. The survey tackled different set of personal views regarding topics discussed in the thesis.
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Being Sami enough - increasing the Sami stage of performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296747
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Spring 2017
  1 document  
Author
Hernes, Maria
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Date
Spring 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1758970
Keywords
Sami
Ethnicity
Language
Gakti
Cultural expression
Abstract
The area of inner Finnmark is often presented as a core Sami area. Many of the cultural markers that are considered and recognised as Sami, are based on traits from these areas. Based on fieldwork done mainly in inner Finnmark, I argue that there is a constant process of expressing a Sami ethnicity within a performance stage defined by both the norms of "how to be Sami" and the ever evolving and breaking of new grounds for this performance. The process might be conceptualised as two axes; one illustrating a measurement of "purity" and the other the constant means of expanding the boundaries for expressions of the Sami ethnicity. Language is a vital foundation that affects both of these axes; although it is used contextually as a marker of Sami ethnicity, it is still an important, perhaps the most important way to assert ones Sami ethnicity, as it makes out the basis of the objective part of the Sami Act’s criteria for how one might be considered Sami. The language is both an important means of communication, and thus social inclusion, but it is also a deeply emotional matter that carries meaning beyond the use as a marker of ethnicity. The gákti (Sami traditional clothes) might be considered the most recognised emblem of Sami ethnicity besides the languages. The making of the gákti is a process that involves both the continuation of cultural specific knowledge, and the composing of new expressions. As the gákti is a garment that pinpoints the wearers geographically based affiliation, it also connects the wearer to a specific social community and might counteract feelings of rootlessness associated with globalisation. Still, it also allows for a range of manipulation within certain boundaries. Based on these two examples, the language and the gákti, I argue that while the Sami ethnic identity needs to take on the challenge of including people into the ethnic group that does not necessarily master this knowledge, this might still be a difficult process for many of the people considering this knowledge as vital for themselves and for their ethnic expression.
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Assessing the Vulnerability of Marine Mammal Subsistence Species in the Bering Sea to Climate Change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297000
Source
University of Washington. School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, College of the Environment.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2017
, the Eskimo Walrus Commission, the Ice Seal Committee, and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. The loss of vital subsistence species as a result of climate change would also mean a loss of indigenous culture, household income, and food security (Hovelsrud et al. 2008; Bering Sea Elders Advisory Group
  1 document  
Author
Ferrara, Grace A.
Source
University of Washington. School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, College of the Environment.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1604269
Keywords
Alaska
Bering Sea
Marine mammals
Climate change
Abstract
The Bering Sea is a highly productive region of the Pacific Arctic. Native Alaskan communities rely heavily on the marine resources of the Bering Sea for survival. The timing of the formation and thaw of sea ice each year has a significant impact on the structure of the Bering Sea ecosystem. In its current state, the northern Bering Sea is a benthic-dominated ecosystem that supports many species of marine invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals. Eight of these mammal species are relied on heavily by Native Alaskans for subsistence. However, this region is already experiencing the effects of climate change in ways that threaten the persistence of these communities as a result of changes in the timing of sea ice advance and retreat. As these changes progress, understanding the ways in which the ecosystem is vulnerable to climate change will be essential for resource managers and local communities to prepare to adapt. Climate change vulnerability analyses (CCVAs) provide a framework for quantifying vulnerability that can be useful for developing, implementing, and monitoring management solutions to reduce vulnerability. This study uses a CCVA to quantify the vulnerability of eight species of marine mammals in the Bering Sea as a first step in understanding how the communities that rely on them for subsistence are also vulnerable. Although some species are more vulnerable than others, this method allows managers to pinpoint sources of vulnerability for each one to develop strategies for reducing their vulnerability.
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'Bushcraft' and 'Indigenous Knowledge' transformations of a concept in the modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297019
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
  1 document  
Author
Fenton, Lisa
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
29597515
Keywords
Saami Kuksa
Traditional knowledge
Bushcraft
Sami
Bow-drill
Trapping
Abstract
The relationship between ‘bushcraft’ and ‘indigenous knowledge’ is investigated through a historical review, an examination of ethnographic literature, fieldwork amongst bushcraft practitioners, and through original case studies. Fieldwork was carried out in Sweden, the USA, and the UK. Case studies of the Saami ‘kuksa’, the ‘figure 4’ deadfall trap, and making fire by friction are used to explore a number of themes in the contemporary bushcraft world: the role of skilled-practice, ethical values, notions of an individually experienced connection with nature, practice as a personal transformative experience, and as an intersubjective relationship between practitioner and craft engagement with the material affordances in the landscape. It is argued that motivations for practice foreground a relationship with an environmental experience that counters ‘alienation’ through the development of techniques required to spend un-insulated time in nature which counter modern Western technocratic lifestyles. Bushcraft destabilises apparently similar categories of activity, particularly tourism, outdoor adventure recreation and education, historical reenactment and survivalism.
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207Bushcraft-and-Indigenous-Knowledge--transformations-of-a-concept-in-the-m.pdf

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Riddu Riddu, joik or rock-n-roll? A study of Riddu Riddu Festivála and its role as a cultural tool for ethnic revialization [sic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297029
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
April 2008
dwellings, sometimes their occupations (e.g. reindeer herding) and rarely – food and handicrafts. This is accompanied by other outdoor activities and musical performances. These festivals function mainly as cultural ‘show-offs’, with little focus or discussions on the peoples’ lives. Therefore I
  1 document  
Author
Leonenko, Anastassia Valerievna
Source
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Date
April 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1656646
Keywords
International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála
Manndalen
Coastal Saami
Culture
Language
Lifestyle
Revitalisation
Abstract
The International Indigenous Riddu Riddu Festivála has taken place every year since 1991 in Manndalen, a Coastal Saami hamlet, in the municipality of Kåfjord in the county of Troms in the North of Norway. The festival represents by itself an independent event that through indigenous management and developed ethno-relations inside the country, promoting the idea of cultural awareness and sensitivity to all ethnic groups, however different they might be, and support them in terms of preservation of their culture, language, and lifestyle in our global and developed world.
This thesis is intended to show the ambiguity and complexity of the Coastal Saami identity in Manndalen, not only with relation to Norwegians, but also with reference to the situation among locals, between adults and youth, traditions and modernity. In other words, which relations between traditions and modernity does Riddu Riddu demonstrate? Therefore this thesis will try to find out the relation of manndalinger to the cultural invention and show their chosen way of the invasion of traditions and how far they accept distortions as authentic to their heritage during the process of cultural invention and which sign-substitutions can be defined in relation to Coastal Saami culture today. Moreover, the purpose of this thesis is to understand the process by which means invented portions of culture acquire authenticity. In other words, how the social reproduction of culture – the process whereby people learn, embody, and transmit the conventional behaviours of their society (Hanson 1989:898) – is happening in the Coastal Saami community today. Therefore the Riddu Riddu festival will be considered further as one of the examples of Coastal Saami cultural invention with the purpose of revitalization an ethnic identity.
Thus, the Riddu Riddu festival can be seen as a visible tool in Manndalen’s process of ethnic revitalisation. In this case, can the festival be considered as an example of an imagined community (Anderson 1983), created as a cultural arena for the Saami political debates and bringing Saami people, the young and the old generation, together? Further, the festival can be seen as an important tool in the process of Coastal Saami ethnic revitalisation with perspectives on northern indigenous and in general world community nowadays. What is the role of this imagined community for its participants? What challenges do manndalinger have in creating both a local and a global symbolic community?
This master thesis is tended to bring up questions for further discussions and become one of the colourful pieces in the mosaic of understanding the Riddu Riddu festival and its role in the revitalisation of Saami identity.
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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
annually 8 (BQCMB, 2008). Reduced reindeer and caribou numbers have threatened the food security and well-being of some communities. In Canada, some communities have reduced or eliminated quotes allowing commercial caribou harvests. Traditional language ability is disappearing in some
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

MeisMason_thesis_fulltext.pdf

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