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Indications of decreasing human PTS concentrations in North West Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130016
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4:91-98.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
, Arkhangelsk has contributed substantially in the collection of samples. Conflict of interest and funding The authors have not received any funding or benefits from industry or elsewhere to conduct this study. References 1. AMAP (2004). Persistent toxic substances, food security and indigenous peoples of
  1 document  
Author
Charlotta Rylander
Torkjel M Sandanger
Natalya Petrenya
Alexei Konoplev
Evgeny Bojko
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4:91-98.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
309186
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Child
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Metals - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Organic Chemicals - blood - toxicity
Pesticides - blood - toxicity
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The Russian Arctic covers an enormous landmass with diverse environments. It inhabits more than 20 different ethnic groups, all of them with various living conditions and food traditions. Indigenous populations with a traditional way of living are exposed to a large number of anthropogenic pollutants, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and toxic metals, mainly through the diet. Human monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals in the Russian Arctic has only been performed on irregular intervals over the past 15 years, thus, there is still a lack of baseline data from many ethnic groups and geographical regions. The aim of the current study was to investigate concentrations of POPs and toxic metals in three groups of indigenous people from the Russian Arctic. Plasma concentrations of POPs were measured in one of the locations (Nelmin-Nos) in 2001-2003 which gave the unique opportunity to compare concentrations over time in a small Russian arctic community.
During 2009 and early 2010, 209 blood samples were collected from three different study sites in North West Russia; Nelmin-Nos, Izhma and Usinsk. The three study sites are geographically separated and the inhabitants are expected to have different dietary habits and living conditions. All blood samples were analyzed for POPs and toxic metals.
PCB 153 was present in highest concentrations of the 18 PCBs analyzed. p,p'-DDE and HCB were the two most dominating OC pesticides. Males had higher concentrations of PCB 138, 153 and 180 than women and age was a significant predictor of PCB 153, 180, HCB and p,p'-DDD. Males from Izhma had significantly higher concentrations of HCB than males from the other study sites and women from Usinsk had higher concentrations of p,p'-DDE. Parity was a significant predictor of p,p'-DDE. Hg and Pb concentrations increased with increasing age and males had significantly higher concentrations of Pb than women. The study group from Izhma had significantly higher concentrations of Cd when controlling for age and gender and the study group from Usinsk had higher concentrations of Se than the others. Compared to the results from Nelmin-Nos in 2001-2003, a clear decrease in p,p'-DDE concentrations for both women and men was observed.
The current study indicates a significant reduction of several PTSs in human blood samples from North West Russia over the past 10 years.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22043215 View in PubMed
Documents

Rylander-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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The Argentinian mother-and-child contaminant study: a cross-sectional study among delivering women in the cities of Ushuaia and Salta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285307
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1364598
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Inger Økland
Jon Øyvind Odland
Silvinia Matiocevich
Marisa Viviana Alvarez
Torbjørn Aarsland
Evert Nieboer
Solrunn Hansen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1364598
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Several ongoing international multidisciplinary projects have examined linkages between environmental chemicals and health. In contrast to Arctic regions, information for the Southern Hemisphere is scarce. Because of the inherent practice of pesticide utilisation and mismanagement, food security is potentially threatened. The most vulnerable period in human life occurs during pregnancy and early childhood, thus a focus on the body burdens of PTS in pregnant or delivering women is warranted. The current study was designed to investigate health risks related to exposure to PTS and food security in two regions of Argentina (Ushuaia and Salta). Our aims were to quantify concentrations of organic and inorganic toxins in serum or whole blood of delivering women and to collect pertinent dietary and medical information. The overall study design, the basic demographic features and essential clinical chemistry findings are described in the current paper. The socioeconomic differences between the two study areas were evident. On average, the women in Ushuaia were 4 years older than those in Salta (28.8 vs. 24.7 years). Respectively, the proportion of current smokers was 4.5 vs. 9.6%; and Salta had a higher birth rate, with 15.6% being para four or more. Saltanean women reported longer breastfeeding periods. Caesarean sections were more frequent in Ushuaia, with 43% of Caesarean deliveries compared with only 6% in Salta. Employment was high in both communities. Recognised environmental pollution sources in the vicinity of participant dwellings were widespread in Salta (56.1%) compared to Ushuaia (9%). The use of pesticides for insect control in homes was most common in Salta (80%). There is an urgent need for a comprehensive assessment of exposures in areas of the Southern Hemisphere. Our data set and the planned publications of observed concentrations of inorganic and organic environmental contaminants in both mothers and their newborns will contribute to this objective.
PubMed ID
28844184 View in PubMed
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Indicators of food and water security in an Arctic Health context--results from an international workshop discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108075
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
James Berner
Alexey A Dudarev
Gert Mulvad
Jon Øyvind Odland
Alan Parkinson
Arja Rautio
Constantine Tikhonov
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Environmental monitoring
Food Safety
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In August 2012, a literature search with the aim of describing indicators on food and water security in an Arctic health context was initialized in collaboration between the Arctic Human Health Expert Group, SDWG/AHHEG and the AMAP (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme within the Arctic Council) Human Health Assessment Group, AMAP/HHAG. In December 2012, workshop discussions were performed with representatives from both of these organizations, including 7 Arctic countries. The aim of this article is to describe the workshop discussions and the rational for the 12 indicators selected and the 9 rejected and to discuss the potential feasibility of these. Advantages and disadvantages of candidate indicators were listed. Informative value and costs for collecting were estimated separately on a 3-level scale: low, medium and high. Based on these reviews, the final selection of promoted and rejected indicators was performed and summarized in tables. Among 10 suggested indicators of food security, 6 were promoted: healthy weight, traditional food proportion in diet, monetary food costs, non-monetary food accessibility, food-borne diseases and food-related contaminants. Four were rejected: per-person dietary energy supply, food security modules, self-estimated food safety and healthy eating. Among 10 suggested indicators of water security, 6 were promoted: per-capita renewable water, accessibility of running water, waterborne diseases, drinking-water-related contaminants, authorized water quality assurance and water safety plans. Four were rejected: water consumption, types of water sources, periodic water shortages and household water costs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23940840 View in PubMed
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