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Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279882
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):33820
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):33820
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
PubMed ID
28156421 View in PubMed
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Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289270
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA; jberner@anthc.org.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Communicable diseases
Community-Based Participatory Research
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Water supply
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:null PMID 23399790
PubMed ID
27974139 View in PubMed
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Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277948
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:33820
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:33820
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
PubMed ID
27974139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130238
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather- related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local
  1 document  
Author
Michael Brubaker
James Berner
Raj Chavan
John Warren
Author Affiliation
Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA. mbrubaker@anthc.org
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
332455
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Floods
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.
In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.
Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.
The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
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Cites: Int J Public Health. 2010 Apr;55(2):85-9619941059
PubMed ID
22022304 View in PubMed
Documents

Brubaker-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Indicators of food and water security in an Arctic Health context--results from an international workshop discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108075
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
James Berner
Alexey A Dudarev
Gert Mulvad
Jon Øyvind Odland
Alan Parkinson
Arja Rautio
Constantine Tikhonov
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Environmental monitoring
Food Safety
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In August 2012, a literature search with the aim of describing indicators on food and water security in an Arctic health context was initialized in collaboration between the Arctic Human Health Expert Group, SDWG/AHHEG and the AMAP (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme within the Arctic Council) Human Health Assessment Group, AMAP/HHAG. In December 2012, workshop discussions were performed with representatives from both of these organizations, including 7 Arctic countries. The aim of this article is to describe the workshop discussions and the rational for the 12 indicators selected and the 9 rejected and to discuss the potential feasibility of these. Advantages and disadvantages of candidate indicators were listed. Informative value and costs for collecting were estimated separately on a 3-level scale: low, medium and high. Based on these reviews, the final selection of promoted and rejected indicators was performed and summarized in tables. Among 10 suggested indicators of food security, 6 were promoted: healthy weight, traditional food proportion in diet, monetary food costs, non-monetary food accessibility, food-borne diseases and food-related contaminants. Four were rejected: per-person dietary energy supply, food security modules, self-estimated food safety and healthy eating. Among 10 suggested indicators of water security, 6 were promoted: per-capita renewable water, accessibility of running water, waterborne diseases, drinking-water-related contaminants, authorized water quality assurance and water safety plans. Four were rejected: water consumption, types of water sources, periodic water shortages and household water costs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23940840 View in PubMed
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