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Household food security and breast-feeding duration among Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290128
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jan; 20(1):64-71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Kathryn E McIsaac
David C Stock
Wendy Lou
Author Affiliation
1Dalla Lana School of Public Health,University of Toronto,30 Bond Street,Toronto,Ontario,Canada,M5B 1W8.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jan; 20(1):64-71
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
There have been few studies investigating the association between food security and breast-feeding duration and none have been conducted among Canadian Inuit, a population disproportionately burdened with food insecurity. We evaluated the association between household food security and breast-feeding duration in Canadian Inuit children.
Data were obtained from the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey.
The Canadian Territory of Nunavut in 2007 and 2008.
Caregivers of Inuit children aged 3-5 years. Participating children were randomly sampled from community medical centre lists.
Out of 215 children, 147 lived in food-insecure households (68·4 %). Using restricted mean survival time models, we estimated that children in food-secure households were breast-fed for 16·8 (95 % CI 12·5, 21·2) months and children in food-insecure households were breast-fed for 21·4 (95 % CI 17·9, 24·8) months. In models adjusting for social class, traditional knowledge and child health, household food security was not associated with breast-feeding duration (hazard ratio=0·82, 95 % CI 0·58, 1·14).
Our research does not support the hypothesis that children living in food-insecure households were breast-fed for a longer duration than children living in food-secure households. However, we found that more than 50 % of mothers in food-insecure households continued breast-feeding well beyond 1 year. Many mothers in food-secure households also continued to breast-feed beyond 1 year. Given the high prevalence of food insecurity in Inuit communities, we need to ensure infants and their caregivers are being adequately nourished to support growth and breast-feeding, respectively.
PubMed ID
27465413 View in PubMed
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Canada's northern food subsidy Nutrition North Canada: a comprehensive program evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290437
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Tracey Galloway
Author Affiliation
a Department of Anthropology , University of Toronto Mississauga , Mississauga , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1279451
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Commerce
Eligibility Determination
Food Assistance - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Nutrition North Canada (NNC) is a retail subsidy program implemented in 2012 and designed to reduce the cost of nutritious food for residents living in Canada's remote, northern communities. The present study evaluates the extent to which NNC provides access to perishable, nutritious food for residents of remote northern communities.
Program documents, including fiscal and food cost reports for the period 2011-2015, retailer compliance reports, audits of the program, and the program's performance measurement strategy are examined for evidence that the subsidy is meeting its objectives in a manner both comprehensive and equitable across regions and communities.
NNC lacks price caps or other means of ensuring food is affordable and equitably priced in communities. Gaps in food cost reporting constrain the program's accountability. From 2011-15, no adjustments were made to community eligibility, subsidy rates, or the list of eligible foods in response to information provided by community members, critics, the Auditor General of Canada, and the program's own Advisory Board. Measures to increase program accountability, such as increasing subsidy information on point-of-sale receipts, make NNC more visible but do nothing to address underlying accountability issues Conclusions: The current structure and regulatory framework of NNC are insufficient to ensure the program meets its goal. Both the volume and cost of nutritious food delivered to communities is highly variable and dependent on factors such as retailers' pricing practices, over which the program has no control. It may be necessary to consider alternative forms of policy in order to produce sustainable improvements to food security in remote, northern communities.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jul 05;75:31127 PMID 27388896
PubMed ID
28151097 View in PubMed
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Prevalance and associations of food insecurity in children with diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138900
Source
J Pediatr. 2011 Apr;158(4):607-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Stacey Marjerrison
Elizabeth A Cummings
N Theresa Glanville
Sara F L Kirk
Mary Ledwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2011 Apr;158(4):607-11
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Diet
Disease Management
Female
Health Behavior
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hunger
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Poverty
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of food insecurity in households with a child with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus (DM), investigate whether food insecurity is associated with poorer DM control, and describe the household characteristics and coping strategies of food-insecure families with a child with DM.
Telephone interviews were conducted with consecutive consenting families over a 16-month period. Food insecurity was assessed through a validated questionnaire; additional questions elicited demographic information and DM management strategies. Charts were reviewed for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed.
A total of 183 families were interviewed. Food insecurity was present in 21.9% (95% confidence interval, 15.87%-27.85%), significantly higher than the overall prevalences in Nova Scotia (14.6%) and Canada (9.2%). Food insecurity was associated with higher HbA1c level; however, in multivariate analysis, only child's age and parents' education were independent predictors of HbA1c. Children from food-insecure families had higher rates of hospitalization, for which food security status was the only independent predictor. Common characteristics and coping strategies of food-insecure families were identified.
Food insecurity was more common in families with a child with DM, and the presence of food insecurity was predictive of the child's hospitalization. Risk factors identified in this study should be used to screen for this problem in families with a child with DM.
PubMed ID
21126743 View in PubMed
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People do not eat n-3 fatty acids, they eat meals

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256651
Source
Pages 329-330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
traditional food pattern is composed of many nutrients with specific effects on cardiovascular health and diabetes. Food patterns are also associated with many non-dietary risk factors. Design: In a cross sectional design, we studied diet and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes among 2247
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard P
Jeppesen C
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark and Department of Family and Health, Greenland Government
Source
Pages 329-330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Eat
Fatty acids
Cardiovascular disease
N-3 fatty acids
Diabetes
Health
Greenland
Inuit
Food
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Determinants of change in fat consumption patterns in Nain, Newfoundland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256652
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
and possible to ensure food security for future generations. To build this tool, in July 2008, g focus groups were conducted with participants 14-70 years of age (23 women, 26 men). 78o/o participated in harvesting activities. Preliminary results indicate that participants have noticed changes in
  1 document  
Author
Bernier S
Furgal C
Winters K
Dewailly E
The Nunatsiavut Government
Author Affiliation
Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Inuit
Food
Fat consumption
Canada
Newfoundland
Nutrition
Health
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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The assessment of bone mineral density, calcium, and vitamin D intake and exposure in British Antarctic Survey personnel

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256653
Source
Pages 330-331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
bone mineralization, adequate amounts of vitamin D, calcium and exercise are required. Although vitamin D can be found in food products such as oily fish, the primary source of our intake is from sun exposure (photoactivation). It is estimated that worldwide a billion people are vitamin D deficient
  1 document  
Author
Boon D
Grant I
Gawn L
Cross S/
Knapp K
Vivian G
Moniz C
Rees G
Marquis P
Author Affiliation
The British Antarctic Survey & SCAR Expert Group
Source
Pages 330-331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Bone Mineral Density
Calcium
Vitamin D
Sun exposure
Exercise
UVB radiation
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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An assessment of dietary intake in an Inuvialuit population to highlight foods for a nutritional intervention program to improve dietary intake: Results from health foods north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256654
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
AN ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY INTAKE IN AN INUVIALUIT POPULATION TO HIGHLIGHT FOODS FOR A NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM TO IMPROVE DIETARY INTAKE, RES UL TS FROM HEAL TH FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, E. De Roose, X. Cao, J. Gittelsohn, A. Corriveau University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  1 document  
Author
Shama S
DeRoose E
Cao X
Gittelsohn J
Corriveau A
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Page 331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Dietary intake
Food
Nutrition
Inuvialuit
Adults
Canada
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Food and nutrient intake of Inuit adults and the development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to evaluate a nutritional and lifestyle intervention program aimed at improving dietary intake and health: Results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256655
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FOOD AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF INUIT ADULTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE TO EVALUATE A NUTRITIONAL AND LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION PROGRAM AIMED AT IMPROVING DIETARY INTAKE AND HEAL TH, RES UL TS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH 5. Sharma, X. Cao, C. Roache, R. Reid, J
  1 document  
Author
Sharma S
Cao X
Roache C
Reid R
Gittelsohn J
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Pages 331-332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Inuit
Canada
Energy
Vitamins
Nutrition
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Quality aspects of the Inuit diet in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256656
Source
Page 332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
: Data are from a cross-sectional study among Inuit >18 years in west Greenland. Data were collected by food frequency questionnaire and interviews. In the analyses we included men and women with a daily consumption of 3350-17 ooo kJ and 2100-15 ooo kJ, respectively. Eligible individuals totalled 2034
  1 document  
Author
Jeppesen C
Bjerregaard P
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Research in Greenland Directorate of Health and National Institute of Public Health
Source
Page 332 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Greenland
Inuit
DQS
Dietary quality score
Men
Women
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Influence of casual wear and everyday diet on health of the Inuit diet in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256657
Source
Pages 332-333 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Dekabrina V
Author Affiliation
Institute of Humanities and North Indigenous Peoples SB RAS
Source
Pages 332-333 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Clothing
Diet
Indigenous
Health
Students
Autotherapy
Synthetic clothing
Winter
Poverty
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Food insufficiency is associated with psychiatric morbidity in a nationally representative study of mental illness among food insecure Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257037
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 May;48(5):795-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Katherine A Muldoon
Putu K Duff
Sarah Fielden
Aranka Anema
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. kmuldoon@alumni.ubc.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 May;48(5):795-803
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Food Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies suggest that people who are food insecure are more likely to experience mental illness. However, little is known about which aspects of food insecurity place individuals most at risk of mental illness. The purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of mental illness among food insecure Canadians, and examine whether mental illness differs between those who are consuming insufficient amounts of food versus poor quality foods.
This analysis utilized the publically available dataset from the Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 4.1. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine the associations between food insecurity and mental health disorder diagnosis, while adjusting for potential confounders. Stratified analyses were used to identify vulnerable sub-groups.
Among 5,588 Canadian adults (18-64 years) reporting food insecurity, 58 % reported poor food quality and 42 % reported food insufficiency. The prevalence of mental health diagnosis was 24 % among participants with poor food quality, and 35 % among individuals who were food insufficient (hunger). After adjusting for confounders, adults experiencing food insufficiency had 1.69 adjusted-odds [95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.49-1.91] of having a mental health diagnosis. Stratified analyses revealed increased odds among women (a-OR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.62-2.20), single parent households (a-OR 2.05, 95 % CI 1.51-2.78), and non-immigrants (a-OR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.64-2.16).
The prevalence of mental illness is alarmingly high in this population-based sample of food insecure Canadians. These findings suggest that government and community-based programming aimed at strengthening food security should integrate supports for mental illness in this population.
PubMed ID
23064395 View in PubMed
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Bill C-51: Proposed federal regulation of traditional medicine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257055
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
knowledge for health and security and 50% rely on Indigenous knowledge for crops and food (Dei, Hall & Rosenburg, 2000). The United Nations Sub -commission on Prevention of Discrimina- tion and Protection of Minorities reports (7) that the annual market va lue of pharmaceutica l prod - ucts derived
  1 document  
Author
Orr P
Author Affiliation
Independent Legislative Counsel, Ontario, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, Canada
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal
Bill C-51
Canadian Food and Drugs Act
Medicine
Traditional medicine
Parliament
Abstract
Bill C-51 was introduced in Parliament in 2008. The Bill included changes to the Canadian Food and Drugs Act that some argue would have a significant effect on the delivery of traditional medicine by Aboriginal healers in Canada. Although the Bill has "died on the order paper," it is likely to be reintroduced by the current government in substantially the same form. The paper identifies the elements of the proposed changes in the federal government's legislative policy towards the practice of traditional medicine, as contained in the proposed legislation, discusses their possible effects on the practice of traditional medicine and assesses the potential ramifications on the rights of Aboriginal persons to practice traditional medicine.
Documents
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Perception of human-derived risk influences choice at top of the food chain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257212
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82738
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bogdan Cristescu
Gordon B Stenhouse
Mark S Boyce
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82738
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Choice Behavior
Ecosystem
Female
Food chain
Humans
Male
Ursidae
Abstract
On human-used landscapes, animal behavior is a trade-off between maximizing fitness and minimizing human-derived risk. Understanding risk perception in wildlife can allow mitigation of anthropogenic risk, with benefits to long-term animal fitness. Areas where animals choose to rest should minimize risk from predators, which for large carnivores typically equate to humans. We hypothesize that high human activity leads to selection for habitat security, whereas low activity enables trading security for forage. We investigated selection of resting (bedding) sites by GPS radiocollared adult grizzly bears (n = 10) in a low density population on a multiple-use landscape in Canada. We compared security and foods at resting and random locations while accounting for land use, season, and time of day. On reclaimed mines with low human access, bears selected high horizontal cover far from trails, but did not avoid open (herbaceous) areas, resting primarily at night. In protected areas bears also bedded at night, in areas with berry shrubs and Hedysarum spp., with horizontal cover selected in the summer, during high human access. On public lands with substantial human recreation, bears bedded at day, selected resting sites with high horizontal cover in the summer and habitat edges, with bedding associated with herbaceous foods. These spatial and temporal patterns of selection suggest that bears perceive human-related risk differentially in relation to human activity level, season and time of day, and employ a security-food trade-off strategy. Although grizzly bears are presently not hunted in Alberta, their perceived risks associated with humans influence resting-site selection.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e2790522194798
Cites: Oecologia. 2009 Mar;159(3):669-7819089457
Cites: Q Rev Biol. 1995 Jun;70(2):165-917610234
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2005 Dec 22;272(1581):2627-3416321785
Cites: Ecology. 2011 Feb;92(2):398-40721618919
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2008 Apr;23(4):194-20118308423
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e3169922363710
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(8):e1195420694139
Cites: Oecologia. 2011 May;166(1):59-6721298447
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2007 Aug;22(8):394-40017590476
PubMed ID
24367549 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of food insecurity is high and the diet quality poor in Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127113
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Catherine Huet
Renata Rosol
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):541-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nunavut
Poverty Areas
Abstract
Indigenous peoples experience a disproportionate burden of food insecurity and the Arctic is no exception. We therefore evaluated the prevalence, socio-demographic, and dietary correlates of food insecurity in the most comprehensive assessment of food insecurity in Arctic Canada. A cross-sectional survey of 1901 Inuit households was conducted in 2007-2008. Measurements included food insecurity, 24-h dietary recalls, socio-demographics, and anthropometry. Food insecurity was identified in 62.6% of households (95% CI = 60.3-64.9%) with 27.2% (95% CI = 25.1-29.3%) of households severely food insecure. The percent with an elevated BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat was lower among individuals from food insecure households compared to food secure households (P = 0.001). Adults from food insecure households had a significantly lower Healthy Eating Index score and consumed fewer vegetables and fruit, grains, and dairy products, and consumed a greater percent of energy from high-sugar foods than adults from food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity was associated with household crowding, income support, public housing, single adult households, and having a home in need of major repairs (P = 0.05). The prevalence of having an active hunter in the home was lower in food insecure compared to food secure households (P = 0.05). Food insecurity prevalence is high in Inuit communities, with implications for diet quality that over the long-term would be anticipated to exacerbate the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. Actions are required to improve food security that incorporate the traditional food system and healthy market food choices.
PubMed ID
22323760 View in PubMed
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Reporting of Indian health service coverage on the American Community Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294089
Source
U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
, address, gender, and in the case of the IHS file Social Security Number. After the assignment of these unique identifiers, all personal information is removed to preserve confidentiality. For more information about this process, see Wagner and Layne (2014). Once the unique identifiers are assigned
  1 document  
Author
Bhaskar, Renuka
Shattuck, Rachel M.
Noon, James
Author Affiliation
U.S. Census Bureau
Source
U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
719082
Keywords
Indians of North America
Health coverage
Indian Health Service
Abstract
Response error in surveys affects the quality of data which are relied on for numerous research and policy purposes. We use linked survey and administrative records data to examine reporting of a particular item in the American Community Survey (ACS) – health coverage among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) through the Indian Health Service (IHS). We compare responses to the IHS portion of the 2014 ACS health insurance question to whether or not individuals are in the 2014 IHS Patient Registration data. We evaluate the extent to which individuals misreport their IHS coverage in the ACS as well as the characteristics associated with misreporting. We also assess whether the ACS estimates of AIANs with IHS coverage represent an undercount. Our results will be of interest to researchers who rely on survey responses in general and specifically the ACS health insurance question. Moreover, our analysis contributes to the literature on using administrative records to measure components of survey error.
Notes
CARRA Working Paper series #2018-04
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The Role of Trust in Sustainable Management of Land, Fish, and Wildlife Populations in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294079
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
and cultural norms greatly influence inherent trust. Within Inuit communities, strong sharing networks (i.e., food, equipment, etc.) require a certain level of trust and acceptance of vulnerability because resources can come and go, and one day that same individual or family may be without supplies
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt JI
Clark D
Lokken N
Lankshear J
Hausner V
Source
Sustainability 2018, 10, 3124; doi:10.3390/su10093124
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1781887
Keywords
Arctic
Knowledge
Governance
Indigenous
Trust
Wildlife
Land
Sustainability
Management
Natural resources
Nunavut
Churchill
Climate
Alaska
Abstract
Sustainable resource management depends on support from the public and local stakeholders. Fish, wildlife, and land management in remote areas face the challenge of working across vast areas, often with limited resources, to monitor land use or the status of the fish-and-wildlife populations. Resource managers depend on local residents, often Indigenous, to gain information about environmental changes and harvest trends. Developing mutual trust is thus important for the transfer of knowledge and sustainable use of land resources. We interviewed residents of eight communities in Arctic Alaska and Canada and analyzed their trust in resource governance organizations using mixed-methods. Trust was much greater among Alaska (72%) and Nunavut (62%) residents than Churchill (23%). Trust was highest for organizations that dealt with fish and wildlife issues, had no legal enforcement rights, and were associated with Indigenous peoples. Local organizations were trusted more than non-local in Alaska and Nunavut, but the opposite was true in Churchill. Association tests and modeling indicated that characteristics of organizations were significantly related to trust, whereas education was among the few individual-level characteristics that mattered for trust. Familiarity, communication, and education are crucial to improve, maintain, or foster trust for more effective management of natural resources in such remote communities.
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Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294080
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
amount and share it with other community members (Wolfe and Walker 1987). These high-harvesting households are extremely important for food security and for preserving local knowledge. There is earlier data about high-harvesters only for Akutan; the number of households harvesting 70% of the
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt J
Marchioni M
Berman M
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1155017
Keywords
Alaska
Atka
Akutan
Nikolski
Subsistence
Environmental change
Abstract
Our surroundings and society are both constantly evolving. Some changes are due to natural processes. People are responsible for other changes, because of what we do—for example, increasing the size of the population, expanding technology, and increasing mobility and connectivity. And some changes—like climate change—are due to a combination of natural processes and actions of people. In the Arctic, including the Aleutian Islands, marine and coastal ecosystems have seen the largest number of regime shifts with direct and indirect consequences for subsistence activities, commercial fisheries, and coastal communities (Council 2016). This paper describes current subsistence activities and changes local residents have observed over time in three Aleutian Island communities—Akutan, Nikolski, and Atka. As described more later, we did initial household surveys in 2016 and a second round in 2017, as well as more detailed interviews with some residents.
Documents

2018_04-AdaptingToEnviroSocialChange.pdf

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Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
January 2011
)  Income distributionIncome distribution  HousingHousing  EducationEducation  Social safety netsSocial safety nets  EnvironmentEnvironment  AddictionsAddictions  Health care servicesHealth care services  Food security and Food security and NutritionNutrition
  1 document  
Author
Alvarez, Gonzalo G
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor of Medicine,
Source
University of Ottawa at The Ottawa Hospital, Division of Respirology and Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [60 p.]
Date
January 2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3162116
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inuit
Pulmonary
Health
Research
Cancer
Statistics
Tuberculosis
Health Care Access
Documents

Alvarez-Inuit-pulmonary-health-Jan--2011.pdf

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Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and Inuit Nutrition Security in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294373
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 Sep; 15(3):590-607
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Tiff-Annie Kenny
Myriam Fillion
Sarah Simpkin
Sonia D Wesche
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 Sep; 15(3):590-607
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) has been fundamental to the diet and culture of Arctic Indigenous Peoples for thousands of years. Although caribou populations observe natural cycles of abundance and scarcity, several caribou herds across the Circumpolar North have experienced dramatic declines in recent decades due to a range of interrelated factors. Broadly, the objectives of this study are to examine food and nutrition security in relation to wildlife population and management status across Inuit Nunangat (the Inuit homeland, consisting of four regions across the Canadian Arctic). Specifically, we: (1) characterize the contribution of caribou to Inuit nutrition across northern Canada and (2) evaluate the population and management status of caribou herds/populations harvested by Inuit. Dietary data were derived from the 2007-2008 Inuit Health Survey, which included dietary information for Inuit adults (n?=?2097) residing in thirty-six communities, spanning three regions (the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, and Nunatsiavut) of the Canadian North. Published information regarding the range, abundance, status, and management status of caribou herds/populations was collected through document analysis and was validated through consultation with northern wildlife experts (territorial governments, co-management, and/or Inuit organizations). While caribou contributed modestly to total diet energy (3-11% of intake) across the regions, it was the primary source of iron (14-37%), zinc (18-41%), copper (12-39%), riboflavin (15-39%), and vitamin B12 (27-52%), as well as a top source of protein (13-35%). Restrictions on Inuit subsistence harvest (harvest quotas or bans) are currently enacted on at least six northern caribou herds/populations with potential consequences for country food access for over twenty-five Inuit communities across Canada. A holistic multi-sectorial approach is needed to ensure the sustainability of wildlife populations, while supporting Inuit food and nutrition security in the interim.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30116999 View in PubMed
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Population-specific HIV/AIDS status report: Aboriginal Peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294483
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
  1 document  
Source
Public Health Agency of Canada. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control. HIV/AIDS Policy, Coordination and Programs Division. xvi, 122 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2387719
Keywords
HIV
AIDS
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Demographic profiles
Documents
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362 records – page 1 of 19.