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Campylobacter spp. in Icelandic poultry operations and human disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186436
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
N J Stern
K L Hiett
G A Alfredsson
K G Kristinsson
J. Reiersen
H. Hardardottir
H. Briem
E. Gunnarsson
F. Georgsson
R. Lowman
E. Berndtson
A M Lammerding
G M Paoli
M T Musgrove
Author Affiliation
USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit, 950 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30604-5677, USA.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):23-32
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Chickens - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk assessment
Seasons
Abstract
We describe the observed relationship of campylobacter in poultry operations to human cases in a closed environment. During 1999 in Iceland, domestic cases of campylobacteriosis reached peak levels at 116/100,000 and in 2000 dropped to 33/100,000. Approximately 62% of broiler carcass rinses were contaminated with Campylobacter spp. in 1999. During 2000, only 15% of the broiler flocks tested Campylobacter spp. positive. In 2000, carcasses from flocks which tested positive on the farms at 4 weeks of age were subsequently frozen prior to distribution. We suggest that public education, enhanced on-farm biological security measures, carcass freezing and other unidentified factors, such as variations in weather, contributed to the large reduction in poultry-borne campylobacteriosis. There is no immediate basis for assigning credit to any specific intervention. We continue to seek additional information to understand the decline in campylobacteriosis and to create a risk assessment model for Campylobacter spp. transmission through this well defined system.
PubMed ID
12613742 View in PubMed
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Barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity for First Nation youths in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82158
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Skinner Kelly
Hanning Rhona M
Tsuji Leonard J S
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
Diet - economics - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity in youths in a remote sub-arctic community, Fort Albany First Nation, Ontario, Canada. STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative multi-method participatory approach. METHODS: The study included a purposive convenience sample of two adult (n = 22) and three youths (n = 30; students in grades 6 to 8) focus groups, unstructured one-on-one interviews with adult key informants (n = 7), and a scan of the community environment. Data were coded and analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Hurricane thinking and concept mapping were used to illustrate findings and relationships between concepts. RESULTS: Dominant emerging themes included empowerment, trust, resources, barriers and opportunities, while major sub-themes included food security, cost, accessibility/availability, capacity building, community support, programs/training and the school snack/breakfast program. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous barriers to healthy nutrition and physical activity exist in this community and are possibly similar in other remote communities. Empowerment is a core issue that should be considered in the design of public health interventions for First Nations youths in remote sub-arctic communities.
PubMed ID
16711466 View in PubMed
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Workshop 4 (synthesis): securing food production under climate variability--exploring the options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95854
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Björklund G.
Author Affiliation
GeWa Consulting, Marmorvägen 16A, 75244 Uppsala, Sweden. gunilla.bjorklund@telia.com
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(7):147-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bangladesh
Climate
Disasters
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Rivers
Water supply
Abstract
Climate variabilities may result in different types of dry spells, droughts or flood situations, having harmful effects on agricultural productivity and food security. Long-term trends in climate variabilities and climate extremes may be a consequence of an on-going climate change and would thus result in a more permanent change in the pre-conditions for food production. The presentations and discussion during the workshop concentrated on some different measures to be taken in addressing these kind of situations and in particularly on the adverse effects of dry spells, droughts and to some extent also floods. The different areas presented were examples from Bangladesh, the indus river and delta region, examples from India (Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh), Israel, Sri Lanka and Uzbekistan.
PubMed ID
15195431 View in PubMed
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Women's health in northern British Columbia: The role of geography and gender

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101164
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Publication Type
Article
Date
Autumn-2005
working, and able to live off the land.21 These attributes survive in the north today. Casey, a ranch woman in the study, noted that women are still expected to carry on the tradition of living off the land by having large gardens and canning and pre- serving food. Other historical elements include a
  1 document  
Author
Leipert, BD
Reutter, L
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontartio
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Date
Autumn-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
224568
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Determinants of health
Gender
Physical environment
Political environment
Social environments
Sociocultural environment
Women
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Although research interest in women's health is growing, much of the literature does not sufficiently describe the importance of geography and gender for the health of women. This qualitative study explored factors in the northern Canadian context that influence women's health by interviewing 25 women in northern Canada.RESULTS: Findings reveal that the importance of the northern context for women's health can be attributed to the north's historical location, and its physical, sociocultural and political environments. The northern context contributes to the marginalization of northern women that is characterized by isolation, limited options, limited power and being silenced.CONCLUSION: Health care practice and policy must attend to contextual as well as individual and sociocultural factors if women's health is to be advanced in northern settings.
PubMed ID
16356385 View in PubMed
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Traditional food attributes must be included in studies of food security in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84426
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Sep;66(4):308-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Lambden Jill
Receveur Olivier
Kuhnlein Harriet V
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Sep;66(4):308-19
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objective was to explore some typically understudied characteristics of food security in Arctic Canada: observed changes to traditional food systems, perceived advantages and health benefits of traditional food and traditional food preferences. STUDY DESIGN: Data analysis used a cross-sectional survey of Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis and Inuit women in 44 Arctic communities. METHODS: Open-ended responses to 4 questions were used to qualitatively investigate roles traditional foods play in Arctic food security. Chi-square tests were applied to responses to ascertain differences by age and region. A fifth question explored agreement with cultural responses to harvesting and using traditional food. RESULTS: Traditional food was regarded as natural and fresh, tasty, healthy and nutritious, inexpensive, and socially and culturally beneficial. Between 10% and 38% of participants noticed recent changes in the quality or health of traditional food species, with physical changes and decreasing availability being reported most often. Caribou, moose and seal were among the foods considered particularly healthy and held special values in these populations. The opinion that all traditional food was healthy was also popular. More than 85%, of participants agreed with most cultural attributes of traditional food. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that traditional food remains important to Arctic indigenous women and that food security in the Arctic is contingent upon access to these foods.
PubMed ID
18018844 View in PubMed
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Status of Alaska Natives report 2004: volume 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294098
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. [423 p.]
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2004
. For example, elec- tricity is two to three times as expensive in remote areas as in Anchorage, and food costs are 50 percent or more higher. • The entire personal income of the eight most remote areas in 2000 was barely larger than that of just the city of Juneau (Figure S-25). That’s a clear measure
  1 document  
Author
Goldsmith S
Angvik J
Howe L
Hill
A
Leask L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. [423 p.]
Date
May 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
22772067
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Economic conditions
Statistics
Eskimos
Aleuts
Social Conditions
Rural conditions
Notes
UAA - ALASKA E98.E2S82 2004
Volume 1. [Main report] -- Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone -- Volume 3. 2000 Census data by ANCSA regions: Alaska Native or American Indian alone or in combination with another race.
Prepared for the Alaska Federation of Natives.
Additional support provided by Understanding Alaska.
Documents

statusaknatives2004-vol1.pdf

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United States Arctic Research Commission annual report, fiscal year 2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100768
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jan-31-2008
such as Barrow and are hunted there. All villages depend on subsistence hunting of marine mammals to obtain at least part of their food supply. Archaeological evidence shows that whaling has been a way of life for
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
Jan-31-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
930040
Keywords
Arctic research
Abstract
The Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 as amended (Public Law 101-609) requires that the US Arctic Research Commission, which was established by this Act, submit to the President of the United States and the Congress, not later than 31 January of eachyear, a report describing its activities and accomplishments during the immediately preceding fiscal year. The Commission presents this report for fiscal year 2007 (1 October 2006 through 30 September 2007).
Notes
Report covers fiscal year (Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 of that year). Editions since FY 2002 are available online via the United States Arctic Research Commission publications home page. Years prior are found in ARLIS Library: Q180.A67U54.
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United States Arctic Research Commission annual report, fiscal year 2006

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100769
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jan-31-2007
/commercial/security) of the Arctic Ocean. • Made presentation on Arctic Ocean Notices to Mariners System and the control/research on oil spills in the Arctic Ocean. • Attended the Ninth meeting of the Alaska Ports Workshop, in which the USARC was a co-sponsor with the UAA. (Jan). Visited the UAF
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
Jan-31-2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
554603
Keywords
Arctic research
Abstract
The Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 as amended (Public Law 101-609) requires that the US Arctic Research Commission, which was established by this Act, submit to the President of the United States and the Congress, not later than 31 January of eachyear, a report describing its activities and accomplishments during the immediately preceding fiscal year. This requirement has since been dropped from the law. However, the Commissioners of the Arctic Research Commission have declared their intention tocontinue publication of an annual report. To that end, the Commission presents this report for fiscal year 2006 (1 October 2005 through 30 September 2006).
Notes
Report covers fiscal year (Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 of that year). Editions since FY 2002 are available online via the United States Arctic Research Commission publications home page. Years prior are found in ARLIS Library: Q180.A67U54.
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United States Arctic Research Commission annual report, fiscal year 2003

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100770
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jan-31-2004
ba�lespace environment research is totally focused on tactical issues and the Army has not been interested in the longer-term climate change impacts. Richter-Menge, engineer, mentioned that she hoped to coordinate a DOD-funded conference on climate change and long-term national security issues
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
Jan-31-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1425790
Keywords
Arctic research
Abstract
The Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 as amended (Public Law 101-609) requires that the US Arctic Research Commission, which was established by this Act, submit to the President of the United States and the Congress, not later than 31 January of each year, a report describing its activities and accomplishments during the immediately preceding fiscal year. In fulfillment of the provisions of the Act, the Commission presents this report for fiscal year 2003 (1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003).
Notes
Report covers fiscal year (Oct. 1 to Sept. 30 of that year). Editions since FY 2002 are available online via the United States Arctic Research Commission publications home page. Years prior are found in ARLIS Library: Q180.A67U54.
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Report on goals and objectives for Arctic research, 2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100772
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
President (specifically Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Council for Environmental Quality, and the Natural Security Council). In its efforts, IARPC should engage the public and endeavor to improve its strategic planning and integration of Arctic research
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2710438
Keywords
Arctic human health
Arctic research
Civil infrastructure
Indigenous language, identity, and culture
Natural resource assessment and earth science
Abstract
This goals report coincides with the beginning of the first International Polar Year (IPY) in 50 years. From March 2007 to March 2009, the IPY will concentrate the efforts of scientists from over 60 nations to initiate, conduct and share the results of polar scientific research, and to create a legacy of human resources and infrastructure that will provide an enduring benefit to mankind.
Documents
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Report on goals and objectives for Arctic research, 2005

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100773
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
Arctic which are affecting the international as well as the national landscape of politics, economics, sociology, security and the environment. Because these dynamics are far reaching and diverse, completed on their own schedule, the recommendations in this report may not exactly coincide with the
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1374636
Keywords
Arctic research
Abstract
The Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 (as amended) directs the United States Arctic Research Commission to publish its "Report on Goals and Objectives for Arctic Research" every two years to guide the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, and thus the member federal agencies, as they prepare their revision of the National Arctic Research Plan. This report for the year 2005 reflects the best judgment of the Commission based upon information gathered at formal meetings, from other Arctic research community meetings, plus interaction with Arctic scientists, the indigenous people of Alaska, the State of Alaska, federal agencies, and interested citizens.
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Report on goals and objectives for Arctic research, 2003

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100774
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
to be sensitive to the dynamics of the Arctic which are affecting the international as well as the national landscape of politics, economics, sociology, security and the environment. Because this is a far reaching and diverse effort, completed on its own schedule, these goals and objectives may not
  1 document  
Author
United States Arctic Research Commission
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
270151
Keywords
Arctic research
Abstract
The Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 (as amended) directs the United States Arctic Research Commission to publish its "Report on Goals and Objectives for Arctic Research" everytwo years to guide the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, and thus the member federal agencies as they prepare their revision of the National Arctic Research Plan. This reportfor the year 2003 reflects the best judgement of the Commission based upon information gathered at formal meetings, from other Arctic research community meetings, the Commission's groupof advisors, through reading, and from daily interactions with those involved in Arctic research--US and foreign researchers, research administrators, Alaska Natives, and others living and working in the North.
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Arctic Telemedicine Project: Final report presented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100820
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
continuing education training. In addition, costs for patient travel can be reduced since follow-up visits can be done remotely, which also affords the local provider with a wider level of training and experience. Continuing education credits for health professionals can be secured locally through
  1 document  
Author
Hild, CM
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
380399
Keywords
Arctic Council
Community interface
Extranet
Health delivery
Health professionals
Internet
Intranet
Interoperability guidelines
Physical infrastructures
Telecommunications
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Training
Abstract
Accessing healthcare is a challenge for arctic residents when compared to the general populations of the eight nations making up this polar region. These far northern residents face physical difficulties, which include great distances, severe wind and cold, and extremes in light. These conditions can be demanding on the health of those who travel and can be harmful to the injured, ill, or infirm. In order for arctic communities to provide adequate healthcare, there must be a sustainable means of delivering this care at a distance. Telemedicine has been identified as the use of computers, telecommunication, and medical tools that allow physical parameters to be put into an electronic format. Although telemedicine is part of the larger telehealth concept, and is dependent on systems of telecommunication, it also involves tele-education and other distance delivery systems. The services that are needed and are being delivered at a distance are defining these remote arctic cities and villages as the "tele-community." Key contacts from each of the eight Arctic Council member nations and each of its four permanent participant indigenous people's groups provided insights and comments for the development of this report to Ministers.
Documents

telemedicine_arctic_Final-Report-Aug-2000.pdf

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Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2009
cooperation, research, scientific information exchange and education in the areas of Arctic health policy, birth defects & genetics, cancer, diet & heart, environmental health Sustainable Development Working Group 2009 6 & subsistence food security, family health, fetal alcohol syndrome, health
  1 document  
Author
Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
134429
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Arctic peoples
Climate change
Communication
Community action
Environmental contaminants
Health promotion
Health Research
Human health
International Polar Year (IPY)
International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH)
Outreach
Prevention strategies
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) represents a unique opportunity to focus world attention on Arctic human health and to further stimulate circumpolar cooperation on emerging Arctic human health concerns. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) isan Arctic Council IPY initiative that aims to build and expand on existing Arctic Council and International Union for Circumpolar Health?s human health research activities. The human health legacy of the IPY will be increased visibility of the human health concerns of arctic communities, revitalization of cooperative arctic human health research focused on those concerns, the development of health policies based on research findings, and thesubsequent implementation of appropriate interventions, prevention and control measures at the community level.
Documents

Arctic_Human_Health_Initiative_Report_2009.pdf

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Historical warnings of future food insecurity with unprecedented seasonal heat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95460
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2009
Author
Battisti David S
Naylor Rosamond L
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1640, USA. battisti@washington.edu
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Date
Jan-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa South of the Sahara
Agriculture - trends
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Climate
Commerce
Crops, Agricultural - economics - growth & development
Droughts
Extreme Heat
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics
Forecasting
France
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature
Humans
Seasons
Tropical Climate
Ukraine
Abstract
Higher growing season temperatures can have dramatic impacts on agricultural productivity, farm incomes, and food security. We used observational data and output from 23 global climate models to show a high probability (>90%) that growing season temperatures in the tropics and subtropics by the end of the 21st century will exceed the most extreme seasonal temperatures recorded from 1900 to 2006. In temperate regions, the hottest seasons on record will represent the future norm in many locations. We used historical examples to illustrate the magnitude of damage to food systems caused by extreme seasonal heat and show that these short-run events could become long-term trends without sufficient investments in adaptation.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2009 Apr 10;324(5924):177-9; author reply 177-919359565
Comment In: Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):19319131598
PubMed ID
19131626 View in PubMed
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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Exploring food security with collective kitchens participants in three Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166067
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Shawna Berenbaum
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Jan;17(1):75-84
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooking - standards
Diet - standards
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Social Welfare
Abstract
Collective kitchens are small groups of people who pool their resources to cook large quantities of food. With the help of semi-participant observation and in-depth individual interviews, this study is an exploration of participants' perceptions of changes in food security since becoming involved in a collective kitchen. Several important themes emerged, including Increased Variety, Making Ends Meet, and Comparisons to Food Banks. Participants in groups that cooked large quantities of food (upwards of five meals monthly) reported some increases in their food resources. Participants also reported increased dignity associated with not having to access charitable resources to feed their families. Some participants reported decreased psychological distress associated with food insecurity. Overall, participants reported increases in food security; however, collective kitchens are not a long-term solution to the income-related food insecurity experienced by many Canadian families.
PubMed ID
17170245 View in PubMed
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An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
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Alaska suicide follow-back study final report: study period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87940
Source
Alaska Injury Prevention Center, Critical Illness and Trauma Foundation, Inc, and American Association of Suicidology. 43 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
how to conduct follow-back interviews with survivors of the decedents. All information was entered into a secure database. All efforts to protect confidentiality were in accordance with the Institutional Review Board requirements of the Alaska Native Medical Center, the University of Alaska
  1 document  
Author
Perkins, R
Sanddal, TL
Howell, M
Berman, L
Sanddal, ND
Source
Alaska Injury Prevention Center, Critical Illness and Trauma Foundation, Inc, and American Association of Suicidology. 43 p.
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
439119
Keywords
Age group
Alaska Natives
Alcohol/drug use
Ethnicity
Mechanism
Non-Natives
Regional differences
Suicide
Urban-rural differences
Indians of North America
Abstract
GOALS: There were two goals for the study: (1) to do an in-depth demographic analysis of the suicides in Alaska for three years from September 1, 2003 through August 31, 2006 and (2) to conduct interviews with key informants for as many suicide cases as possible. This report is divided into two sections, Section 1 addressing the epidemiological data and Section 2 addressing the data derived from the interviews.PURPOSE: The purpose of the data gathering, reporting, and analysis was to better understand the etiology and antecedents of suicide among Alaskans, in order to identify potential points ofintervention and strategies to reduce the rate of suicide.METHODS: Death certificates attributed to suicides occurring in Alaska between September 1, 2003, and August 31, 2006, were reviewed retrospectively. Information from the Alaska StateMedical Examiner, State Troopers, and other law enforcement agencies was collated and reviewed for each suicide death. A cadre of Native and non-Native interviewers was trained in how to use the interview protocol and how to conduct follow-back interviewswith survivors of the decedents. All information was entered into a secure database. All efforts to protect confidentiality were in accordance with the Institutional Review Board requirements of the Alaska Native Medical Center, the University of Alaska Anchorage,and the National Institutes of Health (Certificate of Confidentiality).RESULTS: There were 426 suicides during the 36 month study period. The average annual suicide rate for the three year study period was 21.4/100,000 (U.S. Census, 2005 estimated population). Males out-numbered females 4 to 1. The age-group of 20 to 29 had both the greatest number of suicides and the highest rate per 100,000 population. Alaska Natives had a significantly higher average rate of suicide than the non-Native population (51.4/100,000 compared to 16.9/100,000). The leading mechanism of death was firearms, accounting for 63% of the suicides. The use of handguns was more prevalent in the non-Native population whereas long guns were used more often by Alaska Natives. The EMS region with the greatest number of Native suicides was Region 4, which includes Bethel and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Region 2, which includes the Northwest Arctic census area had the highest overall rate of suicide deaths. Follow-back interviews wereconducted with 71 informants for 56 of the suicide decedents. Reported alcohol/drug use was the same for Urban as for Rural Native decedents. The same alcohol/drug use pattern was seen for Urban and for Rural non-Native decedents. Toxicology results werereceived for 33% of all the suicide cases. Alcohol was found in 44% of the toxicology tests and THC (marijuana) was found in 15%.CONCLUSION: This study adds volumes of information to our existing knowledge of suicide in Alaska. More in-depth studies are already in progress, which will continue to add to our knowledgebase while bringing in additional resources for prevention and treatment. The report also highlights the need for better death data collection, to quantify alcohol and drug involvement and other contributing factors.
Notes
The Alaska Suicide Follow Back Study was prepared for the Statewide Suicide Prevention Council and was substantially funded through the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority and the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.
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Alaska-suicide-follow-back-study.pdf

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Status of Alaska Natives report 2004: Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294134
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2004
Households [PCT97] Social Security Income In 1999 For Households [PCT98] Supplemental Security Income (SSI) In 1999 For Households [PCT99] Public Assistance Income In 1999 For Households [PCT100] Retirement Income In 1999 For Households [PCT101] Other Types Of Income In 1999 For Households
  1 document  
Author
Goldsmith S
Angvik J
Howe L
Hill A
Leask L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
May 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
22028566
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Economic conditions
Statistics
Eskimos
Aleuts
Social Conditions
Rural conditions
Notes
UAA - ALASKA E98.E2S82 2004 Volume 1. [Main report] -- Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone -- Volume 3. 2000 Census data by ANCSA regions: Alaska Native or American Indian alone or in combination with another race.
Prepared for the Alaska Federation of Natives.
Additional support provided by Understanding Alaska.
Documents

StatusAKNativesRpt2004v2.pdf

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152 records – page 1 of 8.