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Campylobacter spp. in Icelandic poultry operations and human disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186436
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
N J Stern
K L Hiett
G A Alfredsson
K G Kristinsson
J. Reiersen
H. Hardardottir
H. Briem
E. Gunnarsson
F. Georgsson
R. Lowman
E. Berndtson
A M Lammerding
G M Paoli
M T Musgrove
Author Affiliation
USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit, 950 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30604-5677, USA.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):23-32
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Chickens - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk assessment
Seasons
Abstract
We describe the observed relationship of campylobacter in poultry operations to human cases in a closed environment. During 1999 in Iceland, domestic cases of campylobacteriosis reached peak levels at 116/100,000 and in 2000 dropped to 33/100,000. Approximately 62% of broiler carcass rinses were contaminated with Campylobacter spp. in 1999. During 2000, only 15% of the broiler flocks tested Campylobacter spp. positive. In 2000, carcasses from flocks which tested positive on the farms at 4 weeks of age were subsequently frozen prior to distribution. We suggest that public education, enhanced on-farm biological security measures, carcass freezing and other unidentified factors, such as variations in weather, contributed to the large reduction in poultry-borne campylobacteriosis. There is no immediate basis for assigning credit to any specific intervention. We continue to seek additional information to understand the decline in campylobacteriosis and to create a risk assessment model for Campylobacter spp. transmission through this well defined system.
PubMed ID
12613742 View in PubMed
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Barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity for First Nation youths in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82158
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Skinner Kelly
Hanning Rhona M
Tsuji Leonard J S
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Apr;65(2):148-61
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
Diet - economics - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate barriers and supports for healthy eating and physical activity in youths in a remote sub-arctic community, Fort Albany First Nation, Ontario, Canada. STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative multi-method participatory approach. METHODS: The study included a purposive convenience sample of two adult (n = 22) and three youths (n = 30; students in grades 6 to 8) focus groups, unstructured one-on-one interviews with adult key informants (n = 7), and a scan of the community environment. Data were coded and analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Hurricane thinking and concept mapping were used to illustrate findings and relationships between concepts. RESULTS: Dominant emerging themes included empowerment, trust, resources, barriers and opportunities, while major sub-themes included food security, cost, accessibility/availability, capacity building, community support, programs/training and the school snack/breakfast program. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous barriers to healthy nutrition and physical activity exist in this community and are possibly similar in other remote communities. Empowerment is a core issue that should be considered in the design of public health interventions for First Nations youths in remote sub-arctic communities.
PubMed ID
16711466 View in PubMed
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Status of Alaska Natives report 2004: volume 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294098
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. [423 p.]
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2004
. For example, elec- tricity is two to three times as expensive in remote areas as in Anchorage, and food costs are 50 percent or more higher. • The entire personal income of the eight most remote areas in 2000 was barely larger than that of just the city of Juneau (Figure S-25). That’s a clear measure
  1 document  
Author
Goldsmith S
Angvik J
Howe L
Hill
A
Leask L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. [423 p.]
Date
May 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
22772067
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Economic conditions
Statistics
Eskimos
Aleuts
Social Conditions
Rural conditions
Notes
UAA - ALASKA E98.E2S82 2004
Volume 1. [Main report] -- Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone -- Volume 3. 2000 Census data by ANCSA regions: Alaska Native or American Indian alone or in combination with another race.
Prepared for the Alaska Federation of Natives.
Additional support provided by Understanding Alaska.
Documents

statusaknatives2004-vol1.pdf

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Status of Alaska Natives report 2004: Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294134
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 2004
Households [PCT97] Social Security Income In 1999 For Households [PCT98] Supplemental Security Income (SSI) In 1999 For Households [PCT99] Public Assistance Income In 1999 For Households [PCT100] Retirement Income In 1999 For Households [PCT101] Other Types Of Income In 1999 For Households
  1 document  
Author
Goldsmith S
Angvik J
Howe L
Hill A
Leask L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
May 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
22028566
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Economic conditions
Statistics
Eskimos
Aleuts
Social Conditions
Rural conditions
Notes
UAA - ALASKA E98.E2S82 2004 Volume 1. [Main report] -- Volume 2. 2000 Census data by ANCSA region: Alaska Native or American Indian alone -- Volume 3. 2000 Census data by ANCSA regions: Alaska Native or American Indian alone or in combination with another race.
Prepared for the Alaska Federation of Natives.
Additional support provided by Understanding Alaska.
Documents

StatusAKNativesRpt2004v2.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
environmental security of the Alas- k a n I n u i t c o a s t l i n e d e p e n d e d “ u p o n t h e s t r e n g t h o f ( s e l f ) government in Canada and Greenland”, and only when we all have our own home rule governments, “will we be able to really trust any offshore operation in the Beaufort
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). 23 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3181838
Keywords
Canada
Inuit
Environment
Wildlife & harvesting
Research & health activities
Human Rights
Documents

06-07_annual_report_lenglish.pdf

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Indigenous Peoples' food systems: the many dimensions of culture, diversity and environment for nutrition and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294487
Source
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment. 339 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
, Andhra Pradesh, India Buduru Salomeyesudas and Periyapatna V. Satheesh 209 Chapter 10 The Bhil food system: links to food security, nutrition and health Lalita Bhattacharjee, Gopa Kothari, Vidya Priya and Biplap K. Nandi 231 Chapter 11 The Maasai food system and food and nutrition security Shadrack
  1 document  
Author
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Erasmus, Bill
Spigelski, Dina
Source
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment. 339 p.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
9714794
Notes
ISBN: 978-92-5-106071-1
From back cover : Food systems of Indigenous Peoples who retain connection to long-evolved cultures and patterns of living in local ecosystems present a treasure of knowledge that contributes to well-being and health, and can benefit all humankind. This book seeks to define and describe the diversity in food system use, nutrition and health in 12 rural case studies of Indigenous Peoples in different parts of the world as a window to global Indigenous Peoples’ circumstances. A procedure for documenting Indigenous Peoples’ food systems was developed by researchers working with the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (CINE) at McGill University, Canada, and the FAO. The procedure was adapted and applied in case studies located in Canada, Japan, Peru, India, Nigeria, Colombia, Thailand, Kenya, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The collective intent of this documentation is to show the inherent strengths of the local traditional food systems, how people think about and use these foods, the influx of industrial and purchased food, and the circumstances of the nutrition transition in indigenous communities. This research was completed with both qualitative and quantitative methods by Indigenous Peoples and their academic partners in the context of the second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, and the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted in 2007 by the General Assembly of the United Nations.
Documents
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Achieving best practice in long term care for Alaska Native and American Indian elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273782
Date
Sept-2005
a distant nursing or assisted living home. In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. Distances between villages and the high cost of food and supplies contribute to the challenges. Most elders desire
  1 document  
Author
Branch, PK
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sept-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
American Indian
Home care
Long Term Care
Service models
Abstract
In rural Alaska, there are particular challenges in delivering services that may be typically available to seniors in more urban areas. There are, however, an increasing number of tribally operated programs in Alaska with a focus on Alaska Native values and traditions that are assisting families in keeping their loved ones close to home. These programs are the tribal health system's emerging best practices.
Documents

yr2_1best-practices.pdf

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Long term care needs of Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273784
Date
Aug-2005
  1 document  
Author
Branch, K
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Assisted living
Elders
Health status
Home care
Long Term Care
Nursing Homes
Abstract
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) received funding from the Indian Health Service to assess the health status and long term care needs of Alaska's Native elders. The project approaches the needs from a systems and service delivery perspective. The objectives are to determine what services are needed, what services are currently available, and where and how the system can develop services for elders that are culturally appropriate and close to home. This report includes a description of long term care services, estimates of current and future numbers of elders needing services, and recommendations for service development in each region of the state.
Documents
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Boarding school project: Mental health outcome

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273785
Date
Jul-2007
. Socioeconomic disadvantage causes fatigue, irritability, and illnesses, and jeopardizes security and well-being. Over time, social inequalities can lead to an obstruction of intellectual development in individuals despite the complete lack of an organic learning deficit. Trauma generated by assaults to
  1 document  
Author
Graves, K
Shavings, L
Rose, C
Saylor, A
Smith, SL
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska Native
Boarding schools
Historical trauma
Abstract
The boarding school era is an unclear and tentative time in history for many Alaskans. This era has come to the forefront while the Alaska state legislators work toward reinstating regional schools. The purpose of this timely research project was to listen to the voices of Alaska Natives who attended boarding school thirty years ago in order to learn more about this obscure period. Researchers for this study performed a secondary analysis on data originally collected in 2005, focusing on different perspectives than the original researchers. Our team was made up of Alaska Natives trained in psychology and social work and involved in healing activities. In particular, researchers spotlighted resiliency factors of students attended boarding schools and attempted to gain a deeper understanding of the mental-health impacts of the boarding school experience and the intergenerational long-term effects. The project team wanted to honor those who openly revealed themselves and their experiences.
Documents

other_boarding-school-project.pdf

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Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
 ____  How Much is Your Rent or House payment: Less than $300 ____ $300 to $400 ____  $400 to $500 ____ $500 to $600 ____ $600 to $700 ____ More than $700 ____  Do you have medical insurance? ____  If yes, what type? __________  Are you currently receiving any type of financial assistance?  Social Security
  1 document  
Author
Mt. Sanford Tribal Consortium
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Abstract
The purpose of the survey is to help us develop services that will assist Elders to live comfortably in their community.
Notes
Survey instrument
Documents

ltc_elder-needs_survey-instrument.pdf

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Elder needs assessment survey results: Chistochina

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273792
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
 Payment? •  NA = 4 •  Less than $300 = 1 •  $300 to $400 •  $400 to $500 = 2 •  $500 to $600 •  $600 to $700 •  More than $700 = 1  What Type of Medical Insurance Do You Have? •  Yes = 4 – work related •  No = 4  Are You Currently Receiving Any Type of Financial Assistance? •  Social Security
  1 document  
Author
Mt. Sanford Tribal Consortium
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Chistochina
Needs Assessment
Documents

ltc_elder-needs_chistochina.pdf

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Elder needs assessment survey results: Mentasta

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273793
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
•  $600 to $700 •  More than $700  What Type of Medical Insurance Do You Have? •  Yes = 18% •  No = 82%  Are You Currently Receiving Any Type of Financial Assistance? •  Social Security = 73% •  SSI = 27% •  Adult Public Assistance = 55% •  Medicaid = 64% •  Medicare = 36% •  Food Stamps = 45
  1 document  
Author
Mt. Sanford Tribal Consortium
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Mentasta
Needs Assessment
Documents

ltc_elder-needs_mentasta.pdf

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Harvested food culture and its influences on valuable functioning of Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273798
Date
Aug-3-2008
  Community  Participation in  Traditional  Food Activities  Provide Day­to­  Day Structure  Food Security 11  DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC CONSTRUCTS  The remainder of the paper presents observations and other data which explain each  construct. To emphasize the relationship of specific information
  1 document  
Author
Smith, J
Date
Aug-3-2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska Native
Diet
Elders
Food culture
Food sharing
Networks
Older adults
Valuable functioning
Abstract
Valuable functioning, an empowered quality of life evident in Alaska Native communities, is influenced at least in part by a harvest food based lifestyle dependent on fish, game and plants procured by the consumer. Elders play important roles in the transmission of knowledge and skills necessary for continuation of food harvesting customs, and through this process, Elders feel valued and obtain quality of life. This paper examines how Elders view their roles. Data for this paper come from several sources: narrative data from twenty Voices of Our Elders Conferences sponsored by the National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Elders at the University of Alaska Anchorage held in 2004-2006, quantitative data from our Inupiaq Elders Study (2004-2006) and observations with Elders from the Healthy Moms Study (2001). In addition, field work observations by the authors are included. Similarities of Voices of Our Elders narrative data lead the authors to propose that harvested food based communities have similar food cultural experiences even though land, location, language and tribal entities are different. The proposed model of food culture illustrates eight key constructs: traditional Native foods are central and appear to be predicated on continued use, access and participation in the procurement. The communities' continued inclusion of Elders is viewed as an indication of the respectful status for Elders, and links villages to experiences of the past and provides a vehicle for the Elder's achievement of valuable functioning, a component of quality of life.
Documents

report_food-culture_08-08.pdf

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Food customs of rural and urban Inupiaq elders and their relationships to select nutrition parameters, food insecurity, health, and physical and mental functioning

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274183
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2007
35.1 + 10.8 years with a range of 18-61 years………………...…………………………………… 55 2.2 Perceptions of the Quality of Life in Two Inupiaq North Slope Borough Communities ……………………………………………………………. 57 2.3 Food Security Rates for the General US Population …………………… 59 2.4 Comparison of Calorie and
  1 document  
Author
Smith, Janell
Author Affiliation
Florida International University
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1102377
Keywords
Alaska
Customs
Diet
Elders
Food
Inupiaq
Mental health
Native foods
Subsistence lifestyle
Abstract
The Inupiaq Tribe resides north of the Arctic Circle in northwestern Alaska. The people are characterized by their continued dependence on harvested fish, game and plants, known as a subsistence lifestyle (Lee 2000:35-45). Many are suggesting that they leave their historical home and move to urban communities, places believed to be more comfortable as they age. Tribal Elders disagree and have stated, "Elders need to be near the river where they were raised" (Branch 2005:1). The research questions focused on differences that location had on four groups of variables: nutrition parameters, community support, physical functioning and health. A total of 101 Inupiaq Elders ≥50 years were surveyed: 52 from two rural villages, and 49 in Anchorage. Location did not influence energy intake or intake of protein; levels of nutrition risk and food insecurity; all had similar rates between the two groups. Both rural and urban Elders reported few limitations of ADLs and IADLs. Self-reported general health scores (SF-12.v2 GH) were also similar by location. Differences were found with rural Elders reporting higher physical functioning summary scores (SF-12.v2 PCS), higher mental health scores (SF-12.v2 MH), higher vitality and less pain even though the rural mean ages were five years older than the urban Elders. Traditional food customs appear to support the overall health and well being of the rural Inupiaq Elders as demonstrated by higher intakes of Native foods, stronger food sharing networks and higher family activity scores than did urban Elders. The rural community appeared to foster continued physical activity. It has been said that when Elders are in the rural setting they are near "people they know" and it is a place "where they can get their Native food" (NRC 2005). These factors appear to be important as Inupiaq Elders age, as rural Inupiaq Elders fared as well or better than Inupiaq Elders in terms of diet, mental and physical health.
Documents

JanellSmithDissertation.pdf

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Successful aging through the eyes of Alaska Native elders: What it means to be an elder in Bristol Bay, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274194
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Dec-2009
.......................................................................................................... 83� Supportive Community .............................................................................................. 88� Knowledge of Native Foods and Subsistence ............................................................ 90� Resilience and Community Sustainability
  1 document  
Author
Lewis, JP
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aging
Alaska Native
Bristol Bay
Community
Elders
Family
Resilience
Abstract
Alaska Natives view aging from a holistic perspective, an approach not typically found in the existing literature on successful aging. There is little research on Alaska Native (AN) Elders and how they subjectively define a successful older age. The lack of a culturally specific definition often results in the use of a generic definition that portrays AN Elders as aging less successfully than their non-Native counterparts. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an AN perspective and what it means to age well in AN communities. An Explanatory Model (EM) approach was used and adapted to focus on the health and well-being of AN Elders and to gain a sense of their beliefs about aging. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 26 Elders in six participating communities to explore the concept of successful aging and the role of their community in the aging process. Focus groups were held in specific communities to present the findings and receive feedback; this ensured the findings and report would be reflective of the unique perspectives of the communities and region. This study highlights four domains of successful aging, or "Eldership": emotion, spirituality, community engagement, and physical health. One aspect of successful aging seen in each of these four domains is optimism, or having a positive outlook on life. These four domains serve as the foundation of how communities define who is an Elder and what is important when considering whether someone has aged successfully or not. Research findings also indicate that aging successfully is based on local understandings about personal responsibility and making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life. Most Elders stated that Elder status is not determined by reaching a certain age (e.g., 65 years), but instead is designated when an individual has demonstrated wisdom because of the experiences he or she has gained throughout life. This research seeks to inform future studies on rural aging that will prioritize the perspectives of Elders to impact positively on the delivery of health care services and programs in rural Alaska.
Documents

dissertation_lewis09.pdf

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Strategic action plan for First nations and Inuit mental wellness : Draft.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294756
Source
First Nations & Inuit Mental; Wellness Advisory Committee.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 2007
  1 document  
Source
First Nations & Inuit Mental; Wellness Advisory Committee.
Date
September 2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
254808
Keywords
First Nations
Inuit
Mental health
Addiction
Treatment
Counseling
Documents

MWAC-Strategic-Action-Plan-draft-Sept07-1.pdf

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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II: Sources, occurrence, trends and pathways in the physical environment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76388
Source
Government of Canada, Ministry of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. Ottawa. 361 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
risks to human health that may result from current levels of contamination in key Arctic food species as well as deter- mining the temporal trends of contaminants of concern in key Arctic indicator species and air. It addressed these issues under a number of subprograms: human health; monitoring the
  1 document  
Author
Bidleman, T.
Macdonald, R.
Stow, J.
Source
Government of Canada, Ministry of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. Ottawa. 361 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
15434725
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Contamination
NCP human health studies
Northern Canada
Toxicology
Abstract
The Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) was established in 1991 in response to concerns about human exposure to elevated levels of contaminants in fish and wildlife species that are important to the traditional diets of northern Aboriginal peoples. Early studies indicated that there was a wide spectrum of substances: persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides, many of which had no Arctic or Canadian sources, but which were, nevertheless, reaching unexpectedly high levels in the Arctic ecosystem. Under the first phase of the NCP (NCP-I), research was focussed on gathering the data required to determine the levels, geographic extent, and source of contaminants in the northern atmosphere, environment and its people, and the probable duration of the problem. Results generated through NCP-I were synthesized and published in 1997 in the first Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report (CACAR-I). In 1998, the NCP began its second phase (NCP-II), which will continue until March 2003. NCP-II focussed upon questions about the impacts and risks to human health that may result from current levels of contamination in key Arctic food species as well as determining the temporal trends of contaminants of concern in key indicator Arctic species and air. It addressed these issues under a number of subprograms: human health; monitoring the health of Arctic peoples and ecosystems and the effectiveness of international controls; education and communications; and international policy.The priority areas in the human health subprogram during NCP-II included: exposure assessment, toxicology, epidemiology, and risk and benefit characterization. The key objectives of this, the human health technical report in the CACAR-II series, are to summarize the knowledge produced since the first CACAR on human exposure to and possible health effects of current levels of environmental contaminants in the Canadian Arctic, and to identify the data and knowledge gaps that need to be filled by future human health research and monitoring. The CACAR-II series consists of a Highlights report and four technical reports: human health, biological environment, physical environment and knowledge in action.
Notes
ISBN 0-662-33468-X
Documents

CACAR-Source-Occur-Trend.pdf

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Improving the health status of Alaskans: University of Alaska's role

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76390
Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 15 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-2004
recently garnered biomedical research capacity building grants. With the addition of new biomedical facilities in Anchorage and Fairbanks, the faculty will have the space necessary to secure a signifi- cant share of federal funding for biomedical research important to Alaska. Alaska also does not have any
  1 document  
Author
Perdue, K
Happ, G
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
University of Alaska Anchorage. 15 p.
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
381844
Keywords
Alaska
Health care
Abstract
The University of Alaska has a major role to play in improving the health status of Alaskans by educating the workforce needed in the health care field and by tackling tough health research questions. Health education and research has become a major focus of UA. That's because the University is responding to a tremendous need, as expressed by industry, for a trained health care workforce, especially in nursing, allied health, and behavioral health.
Notes
Available online
Documents

UA_Improving-the-Health-Status-of-Alaskans_n.d.pdf

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Household food insecurity with hunger is associated with women's food intakes, health and household circumstances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193081
Source
J Nutr. 2001 Oct;131(10):2670-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
V S Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2001 Oct;131(10):2670-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Data Collection
Diet Records
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Health status
Humans
Hunger
Middle Aged
Ontario
Poverty
Social Support
Abstract
This study investigated food intake patterns and contextual factors related to household food insecurity with hunger among a sample of 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance in Toronto. Women in households characterized by food insecurity with severe or moderate hunger over the past 30 d (as assessed by the Food Security Module) reported lower intakes of vegetables and fruit, and meat and alternatives than those in households with no hunger evident. Women were more likely to report household food insecurity with hunger over the past 12 mo and 30 d if they also reported longstanding health problems or activity limitations, or if they were socially isolated. The circumstances that women identified as precipitating acute food shortages in their households included chronically inadequate incomes; the need to meet additional, unusual expenditures; and the need to pay for other services or accumulated debts. Women who reported delaying payments of bills, giving up services, selling or pawning possessions, or sending children elsewhere for a meal when threatened with acute food shortages were more likely to report household food insecurity with hunger. These findings suggest that expenditures on other goods and services were sometimes foregone to free up money for food, but the reverse was also true. Household food insecurity appears inextricably linked to financial insecurity.
PubMed ID
11584089 View in PubMed
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Maintaining population health in a period of welfare state decline: political economy as the missing dimension in health promotion theory and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164270
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(4):236-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Dennis Raphael
Toba Bryant
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada. draphael@yorku.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(4):236-42
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health promotion
Humans
Models, Theoretical
National Health Programs
Politics
Public Health
Public Policy
Social Environment
Social Welfare
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
There is increasing recognition in the health promotion and population health fields that the primary determinants of health lay outside the health care and behavioural risk arenas. Many of these factors involve public policy decisions made by governments that influence the distribution of income, degree of social security, and quality and availability of education, food, and housing, among others. These non-medical and non-lifestyle factors have come to be known as the social determinants of health. In many nations--and this is especially the case in North America--recent policy decisions are undermining these social determinants of health. A political economy analysis of the forces supporting as well as threatening the welfare state is offered as a means of both understanding these policy decisions and advancing the health promotion and population health agendas. The building blocks of social democracies--the political systems that seem most amenable to securing the social determinants of health--are identified as key to promoting health. Health promoters and population health researchers need to "get political" and recognize the importance of political and social action in support of health.
PubMed ID
17410974 View in PubMed
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