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Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Apr 22;85(7):19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-1997
Author
E. Gjelsvik
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Apr 22;85(7):19
Date
Apr-22-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developing Countries
Food Supply
Humans
Norway
Poverty
Social Security
PubMed ID
9464130 View in PubMed
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A history of health and social services in Alaska: Dedicated to the 1993 centennial of public health nursing in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96202
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1993
migration patterns of the animals. Men, women and children foraging food were challenged by their surroundings every day. The subsistence lifestyle made the Natives susceptible to starvation and drowning, loss of limb and loss of life. Most communities were small, transient, and almost everywhere
  1 document  
Author
State of Alaska Department of Health & Social Services
Date
May 1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
181698
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Department of Health
Alaska Native health care
Alcoholism and drug abuse
Arctic Health Research Center
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Circumpolar health
Community health care
Endemic health problems
Family and youth services
Floating health centers
Indigenous health care
Matanuska colony
Mobile Health Units
Parran Report
Public Assistance
Public Health
Public welfare
Social Security Act
Territorial health
Tuberculosis
Western disease
WWII impact on health
Abstract
For many years, health and human services professionals have urged complilation of a department history within the context of evolving health and human services in Alaska. This publication was prepared in response to those requests. It reviews broad issues and events, highlighting their contribution to health and social services in our state.
Notes
Found in the Alaska Collection: RA447.A4 H57 1993
Documents
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Dietary antioxidants and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225751
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1991
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
A. Rissanen
A. Aromaa
O P Heinonen
D. Albanes
M. Heinonen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Social Security, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Date
Sep-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Carotenoids - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Eating
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retinoids - pharmacology
Risk
Selenium - pharmacology
Smoking
Vegetables
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The relation between the intake of retinoids, carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, and selenium and the subsequent risk of lung cancer was studied among 4,538 initially cancer-free Finnish men aged 20-69 years. During a follow-up of 20 years beginning in 1966-1972, 117 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. Inverse gradients were observed between the intake of carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C and the incidence of lung cancer among nonsmokers, for whom the age-adjusted relative risks of lung cancer in the lowest tertile of intake compared with that in the highest tertile were 2.5 (p value for trend = 0.04), 3.1 (p = 0.12), and 3.1 (p less than 0.01) for the three intakes, respectively. Adjustment for various potential confounding factors did not materially alter the results, and the associations did not seem to be due to preclinical cancer. In the total cohort, there was an inverse association between intake of margarine and fruits and risk of lung cancer. The relative risk of lung cancer for the lowest compared with the highest tertile of margarine intake was 4.0 (p less than 0.001), and that for fruits was 1.8 (p = 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for the micronutrient intakes and were stronger among nonsmokers. The results suggest that carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C may be protective against lung cancer among nonsmokers. Food sources rich in these micronutrients may also have other constituents with independent protective effects against lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1167-9; author reply 1169-701462977
PubMed ID
1897503 View in PubMed
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Health and nutrition in children under 2 years of age in three areas of the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213130
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1996;74(6):605-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Welch
N. Mock
B. Sorensen
O. Netrebenko
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health and Development, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112-2737, USA.
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1996;74(6):605-12
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Immunization
Infant
Infant Food - standards
Infant Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Morbidity
Russia
Abstract
The study objectives were to determine the nutritional status of children under 2 years of age in selected areas of the Russian Federation, to estimate the proportion of children potentially at risk for nutritional problems, and to characterize such a vulnerable group in terms of demographic variables. A cross-sectional sample of children under 2 years of age was used. Six areas-Moscow, St Petersburg, Ekaterinburg, and their surrounding oblasts-were sampled, and data were collected for approximately 800 children in each area between July and December 1993. A low prevalence of children with a weight-for-age Z-score below -2 was found, indicating that at the time of the survey protein-energy malnutrition was not a serious problem for this age group. However, other survey results indicating high morbidity, low immunization rates, the possibility of food insecurity, and poor infant-feeding practices imply that children's health could easily deteriorate. Therefore, food security and children's nutrition should be monitored to avoid serious consequences in the future. The results also show that there is ample scope for public health interventions that encourage more effective immunization coverage, emphasize prevention of childhood diseases, and promote proper infant-feeding practices.
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1984 Mar;39(3):437-456695843
Cites: RDH. 1989 Feb;9(2):12-3, 152756133
PubMed ID
9060221 View in PubMed
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[The provision of the pediatric population of Russia with high-quality products--a problem of national security].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213141
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1996;(5):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996

Women's dietary intakes in the context of household food insecurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202843
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Mar;129(3):672-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
V S Tarasuk
G H Beaton
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Mar;129(3):672-9
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Services
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Iron - administration & dosage
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Women's health
Abstract
A study of food insecurity and nutritional adequacy was conducted with a sample of 153 women in families receiving emergency food assistance in Toronto, Canada. Contemporaneous data on dietary intake and household food security over the past 30 d were available for 145 of the women. Analyses of these data revealed that women who reported hunger in their households during the past 30 d also reported systematically lower intakes of energy and a number of nutrients. The effect of household-level hunger on intake persisted even when other economic, socio-cultural, and behavioral influences on reported dietary intake were considered. Estimated prevalences of inadequacy in excess of 15% were noted for Vitamin A, folate, iron, and magnesium in this sample, suggesting that the low levels of intake associated with severe household food insecurity are in a range that could put women at risk of nutrient deficiencies.
PubMed ID
10082773 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity: consequences for the household and broader social implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203007
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):525S-528S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A M Hamelin
J P Habicht
M. Beaudry
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences des aliments et de nutrition, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):525S-528S
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Hunger
Male
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Social Alienation
Social Values
Stress, Psychological
Urban Population
Abstract
A conceptual framework showing the household and social implications of food insecurity was elicited from a qualitative and quantitative study of 98 households from a heterogeneous low income population of Quebec city and rural surroundings; the study was designed to increase understanding of the experience of food insecurity in order to contribute to its prevention. According to the respondents' description, the experience of food insecurity is characterized by two categories of manifestations, i.e., the core characteristics of the phenomenon and a related set of actions and reactions by the household. This second category of manifestations is considered here as a first level of consequences of food insecurity. These consequences at the household level often interact with the larger environment to which the household belongs. On a chronic basis, the resulting interactions have certain implications that are tentatively labeled "social implications" in this paper. Their examination suggests that important aspects of human development depend on food security. It also raises questions concerning the nature of socially acceptable practices of food acquisition and food management, and how such acceptability can be assessed. Guidelines to that effect are proposed. Findings underline the relevance and urgency of working toward the realization of the right to food.
PubMed ID
10064323 View in PubMed
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Food security: what the community wants. Learning through focus groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216722
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
D. Hargrove
J A Dewolfe
L. Thompson
Author Affiliation
Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Health Unit, Ontario.
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1994;55(4):188-91
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - methods
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Mental health
Ontario
Public Health Administration
Self Concept
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We used focus groups to learn the range of issues threatening food security of low income residents in our community. Five major themes emerged from the discussions: literacy, money, time, mental health and self-esteem, suggesting several approaches that could help ensure food security: 1) education, 2) sharing of resources, 3) coalition building, and 4) advocacy. Education programs have to be practical, allowing for demonstrations and hands-on learning while emphasizing skill building and problem solving. Incorporating a social aspect into learning may compensate for the social isolation and would capitalize on the impressive mutual support we witnessed. Strategies based on self-help and peer assistance may counteract low self-esteem and overcome suspicion of health professionals. A community-wide effort is needed to address the factors contributing to food insecurity. We envision the formation of a coalition of professionals, agencies, and low income people to develop a comprehensive strategy for achieving food security.
PubMed ID
10139320 View in PubMed
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The structure of a factory closure: individual responses to job-loss and unemployment in a 10-year controlled follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73805
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(12):1301-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(12):1301-11
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Aged
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Pensions
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retirement
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Social Adjustment
Unemployment - psychology
Abstract
A prospective study has been conducted of 85 employees (72 women and 13 men) made redundant when a brisling sardine factory on the west coast of Norway was shut down in 1975. 87 employees (66 women and 21 men) in a 'sister factory' which was not shut down, were used as controls. Previous analyses have shown a substantial reduction in future employment of the study group, a two-fold increase in time consumed on sick leave during the first follow-up year, and a more than three-fold increase in the life-table based rates of disability pensions (invalidity) during the first four follow-up years compared to the controls. In this paper the follow-up data regarding six mutually exclusive and inclusive conditions related to employment and health have been analysed on a weeks per person per year basis, permitting the effects of job-loss over 10 years to be compared with what could have been expected had the factory not been closed. For those not subjected to old age pension or death, three kinds of long-term adaptation showed a marked differential effect among study subjects and controls: a substantial long-term reduction in mean time spent in job, an increase in consumption of time on disability pension, and an increase in time spent outside the labour force without social security coverage, the latter being mostly confined to women. These follow-up data provide a comprehensive picture of individual long-term adaptation to involuntary job-loss, emphasizing its effects on future employment, health, social readjustment and social security benefit consumption.
PubMed ID
2287959 View in PubMed
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Physical activity, smoking and overweight among the Cree of eastern James Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227707
Source
Pages 770-773 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
>oats, s-obilcs and tclaUioo baYC appeared. Re- duced pbysical activity and a~ in awilabilityof food baYC JlllM'd the way for die 5'>Glled health prd>lcmli of civilimtion: ~of Cllidiovasal- latdisasa and diabetes alt! OD the rise and obesity is ba.unillg c:ndemic (4,5). With this in mind, the
  1 document  
Author
C. Lavallée
E. Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, Montreal General Hospital.
Source
Pages 770-773 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Exercise
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - ethnology
PubMed ID
1365296 View in PubMed
Documents
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Source
Anchorage: Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Maternal, Child and Family Health. 64 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1997
of this project was made possible or greatly enhanced by: • The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (TItle V of the Social Security Act), Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, which provided funding for this project through the '~aska Child Health
  1 document  
Author
Achatz, Mary
Caldera, Debra
Source
Anchorage: Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Maternal, Child and Family Health. 64 pages.
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3573765
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Public Health
Human services
Social Problems
Rural conditions
Notes
ALASKA RA425.A45 1997
Documents
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Chernobyl post-accident management: the ETHOS project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33144
Source
Health Phys. 1999 Oct;77(4):361-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
G H Dubreuil
J. Lochard
P. Girard
J F Guyonnet
G. Le Cardinal
S. Lepicard
P. Livolsi
M. Monroy
H. Ollagnon
A. Pena-Vega
V. Pupin
J. Rigby
I. Rolevitch
T. Schneider
Author Affiliation
Mutadis, Paris, France.
Source
Health Phys. 1999 Oct;77(4):361-72
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Animals
Byelarus
Child
Emergencies
Europe
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Government Agencies
Health education
Humans
Meat - standards
Milk - standards
Mothers
Pilot Projects
Radioactive fallout
Ukraine
Abstract
ETHOS is a pilot research project supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (DG XII). The project provides an alternative approach to the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the CIS in the post-accident context of Chernobyl. Initiated at the beginning of 1996, this 3-y project is currently being implemented in the Republic of Belarus. The ETHOS project involves an interdisciplinary team of European researchers from the following institutions: the Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire CEPN (radiological protection, economics), the Institute National d'Agronomie de Paris-Grignon INAPG (agronomy, nature & life management), the Compiegne University of Technology (technological and industrial safety, social trust), and the Mutadis Research Group (sociology, social risk management), which is in charge of the scientific co-ordination of the project. The Belarussian partners in the ETHOS project include the Ministry of Emergencies of Belarus as well as the various local authorities involved with the implementation site. The ETHOS project relies on a strong involvement of the local population in the rehabilitation process. Its main goal is to create conditions for the inhabitants of the contaminated territories to reconstruct their overall quality of life. This reconstruction deals with all the day-to-day aspects that have been affected or threatened by the contamination. The project aims at creating a dynamic process whereby acceptable living conditions can be rebuilt. Radiological security is developed in the ETHOS project as part of a general improvement in the quality of life. The approach does not dissociate the social and the technical dimensions of post-accident management. This is so as to avoid radiological risk assessment and management being reduced purely to a problem for scientific experts, from which local people are excluded, and to take into consideration the problems of acceptability of decisions and the distrust of the population towards experts. These cannot be solved merely by a better communication strategy. This paper presents the main features of the methodological approach of the ETHOS project. It also explains how it is being implemented in the village of Olmany in the district of Stolyn (Brest region) in Belarus since March 1996, as well as its initial achievements.
PubMed ID
10492342 View in PubMed
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The impact of a food transportation subsidy on the cost of a Nutritious Northern Food Basket

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102168
Source
Pages 276-281 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Arctic Medical Research vol. 53: Suppl. 2, pp. 276-281, 1994 The Impact of a Food Transportation Subsidy on the Cost of a Nutritious Northern Food Basket Fred HilJI, Judith Lawn2 and Linda Robbins3 I Strategic Analysis Division, Northern Affairs program, Department of Indian Affairs and
  1 document  
Author
Hill, F
Lawn, J
Robbins, L
Author Affiliation
Strategic Analysis Division, Northern Affairs program, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Dialogos Educational Consultants, Quebec, Canada
Food Industry Development Division, Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 276-281 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Canada
Food items
Food prices
Food security
Isolated communities
Northwest Territories
Nutrition
Perishable food
Postage rate
Abstract
The Government of Canada subsidizes food transportation to isolated northern communities through an annual payment of $15 million to Canada Post Corporation. Recent changes have focused the funding more on nutritious perishable food and extended the "food mail" service to additional regions. A Nutritious Northern Food Basket was developed to monitor the impact of the program on food prices. The results confirm that the program changes have made nutritious perishable food more affordable in isolated Native communities in the Northwest Territories.
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The effect of a federal transportation subsidy on nutritional status of Inuit in Canada's Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102171
Source
Pages 289-295 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Abstract: Changes to a federal subsidy on nutritious perishable and non-perishable foods were examined among 292 women of child-bearing age in three Inuit communities. Problems were identified in relation to food security, concern over access
  1 document  
Author
Lawn, J
Langner, N
Brulé, D
Thompson, N
Hill, F
Author Affiliation
Educational Consultants, Inc., Quebec, Canada
NRL Research, Ontario, Canada
Nutrition Surveys Section, Nutrition Research Division, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Nutrition Research Division, Health Protection Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Strategic Analysis Division, Northern Affairs Branch, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 289-295 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Consumption
Country food
Food security
Health
Inuit
Lifestyle
Nutrients
Nutrition
Perishables
Traditional diet
Women
Abstract
Changes to a federal subsidy on nutritious perishable and nonperishable foods were examined among 292 women of childbearing age in three Inuit communities. Problems were identified in relation to food security, concern over access to and safety of country food, insufficient income to adequately feed the family, serious concerns over alcohol and drug abuse and family violence, and high smoking rates. Women spent little time on the land and were only moderately active. There were low mean intakes for calcium, vitamin A, and folacin. Pregnant and lactating women were at greatest risk. Country food was the major source of protein and iron and store foods the major source of calories and most other nutrients. Nutritious perishables were the most important source of folacin and vitamin A. All communities had a high consumption of food of little nutritional value. Significantly lower postal rates (and lower retail prices) did appear to increase consumption of these foods. Higher rates appeared to lower consumption of some nutritious perishables.
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Past radiation incidents in Alaska: Risk assessment and public health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102191
Source
Pages 372-375 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
?nce~s were 1~~ military operated the first nuclear electric power charged from the institution. Iromcally m Mt !he~ generation plant in the world in central Alaska far each was awarded an honorary doctorate or away from most populations for security reasons on role (4). . . nder discus· many
  1 document  
Author
Hild, C.M
Author Affiliation
Alaska Health Project, Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Pages 372-375 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Ocean
Cesium-137
Human exposures
Impacts
Isotopes
Nuclear materials
Public Health
Radiation
Radioactive materials
Strontium-90
Abstract
An Alaskan review of nuclear radiation incidents, which may have led to potential human exposures, is evaluated for its public health impact. Risk assessments of exposures today from known, nonmilitary sources will be compared to the possible exposure from reported events when the public was, and could still be, being exposed. With concerns that there currently are no known safe levels of nuclear radiation exposure, suggestions for long-term health impact studies will be made so that there will be evaluations of low-level exposures. The polar regions may be a natural laboratory for such investigations due to the reduced geomagnetic field and ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere.
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Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health : abstracts, followed by author index and keyword index : Anchorage, Alaska, U.S.A., May 19 - May 24, 1996

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293149
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1996
the Arctic.A few major cen- ters manned with specialists and flying doctors would help recruite doctors. 16 CONTAMINANTS IN DUCKS"usEb AS SUBSISTENCE FOODS INNORTH CENTRAL ALASKA. John S. Barclay and Barry Wbitehill.... Universky ofConaectieut,Storrs.,USA. Local native concern re possible
  1 document  
Author
International Congress on Circumpolar Health
American Society for Circumpolar Health
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
14390077
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Circumpolar medicine
Cold Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Public Health
Notes
RC 955.2 .I574 1996
Documents

10th-Int-Cong-Circumpolar-Hlth-Abstracts.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Aleutian-Pribilof Islands region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102056
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
, "High or sudden winds and fog were of immediate importance to the Aleuts. Prolonged periods of bad weather could leave hunters landbound, leading to hunger and even starvation" (1991:22). Hunters caught in a severe storm at sea faced grave peril, and many were lost at sea. Food procurement could
  1 document  
Author
Black, LT
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 3
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aleutian region
Aleuts
Bering Sea
Commandor Islands
Cultural divisions
Dialects
Diseases
Ecological knowledge
Economy
Ethnohistory
Fur hunters
Indigenous societies
Kinship
Language
Near Islands
Orthodox Christianity
Pathology
Polities
Precontact rituals
Russians
Social structure
Warfare
Abstract
The term Aleutian Region refers to the habitat of the Unangan (Aleut) speakers. In pre-contact times this area encompassed, from east to west, the Shumagin Island to the south of the Alaska Peninsula, the area of the Alaska Peninsula west of Port Moller, and all the islands of the Aleutian Archipelago, including the Near Islands in the west. In post-contact time, two Bering Sea island groups, the Pribilof Islands in the United States and the Commandor Islands (Komandorskie ostrova) in Russia, were settled by Aleuts and are incorporated today in the Aleutian Region.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 3_Ethnographic Summary_Aleutian-Pribilof Isla.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Chukotka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102057
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
and servicemen were having difficulty Social Transition in the North Chukotka Ethnography, Page 10 obtaining walrus tusks, furs and food. As a result of their misfortune, they pressured the governor of Yakutia province, Voevode A. Barnashlev, to send a petition to Moscow with a request to
  1 document  
Author
Pika, AI
Terentyeva, LP
Bogoyavlensky, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 4
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Christianity
Chukchis
Chukotka
Economy
Eskimos
Ethnography
Ethnohistory
Fur breeding
Geography
Health care
Hunting
Indigenous populations
Kinship
Marriage
Reindeer breeding
Sea mammal harvest
Social organization
Subsistence
Traditional culture
Whaling
Abstract
The Providenski district (covering 26.8 thousand square kilometers) occupies the southeastern portion of the Chukotski Peninsula. The southeastern coast of the district is surrounded by the Bering Sea, while the northeast boundary borders the Chukotka district and the western edge neighbors the Yiultinsky district. Prior to 1957, the Providenski district was incorporated into the Chukotka district.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 4_Ethnographic Summary_Chukotka Region_May 1993.pdf

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Ethnographic summary: The Kamchatka region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102058
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Communities 66 V.A. Indexes of Birthrate. Mortality Rates and Population Growth . . . . . . . . 68 V.B. Social Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 V.C. The Demography of the Indigenous Population of Karaga . . . . . . . . . . . 77
  1 document  
Author
Mourashko, OA
Pika, AI
Bogoyavlenski, DD
Author Affiliation
Social Research Institute, Anchorage, AK
Source
Social Transition in the North, Working Papers, Vol. 1, No. 5
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Bering Sea
Communication
Demographic behavior
Economy
Ethnic composition
Evens
Fish harvests
Indigenous populations
Itelmens
Kamchadals
Kamchatka Peninsula
Mortality
Orthodox Church
Reindeer
Settlement
Shamanism
Social structure
Subsistence
Traditional use
Abstract
The Kamchatka Administrative Region is made up of the Tigilsky, Karaginsky, and Bystrinsky districts. These districts share common boundaries, which extend from latitude 55°45' to 60°45'north to longitude 153°45' to 165° east. Together, they cover 108,300 square kilometers, with the Tigilsky District spreading out over 68,200 square kilometers, the Karaginsky District spanning 29,500 square kilometers, and the Bystrinsky District occupying 20,600 square kilometers. From south to north, the boundaries between the districts are divided by the Sredinny Mountain Ridge. This ridge descends towards the isthmus of the Kamchatka Peninsula and becomes a watershed (made by rivers flowing into the Okhotsky and Bering seas). Between the Tigilsky and Bystrinsky districts, there is the Ichinsky volcano (3,621 meters), which is extinct. To the west of the Sredinny Ridge lies the West Kamchatka Lowland. This lowland makes up a major part of the Tigilsky District; but because it is so badly bogged it keeps the development of land traffic and communications in the Tigilsky District greatly hindered. It is only in the coastal area that there are still old pathways linking separate villages, and trails which lead up to the passes over the Sredinny Ridge. The northern part of the Tigilsky District and the entire Karaginsky District are located in the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Farther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustaya rivers meet, is Parapolsky Dol.the southern edge of the Eternal Congelation Zone. Located in this zone are the villages of Tigil, Sedanka, Elovka, and Uka. Fuirther north, in the narrowest part of the neck where the valleys of the Anapka and Pustay rivers meet, is Parapoolsky Dol.
Notes
The entire collection of working papers from the Social Transition in the North project is available at UAA Archives & Special Collections in the Consortium Library.
Documents

STN_Vol 1_No 5_Ethnographic Summary_Kamchatka Region_Aug 1993.pdf

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People and the Arctic: A prospectus for research on the human dimensions of the Arctic system (HARC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102063
Source
Report prepared for the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science Program
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-1997
the Arctic Ocean). Such problems may alter the trophic dynamics of the arctic system, affecting the abundance and safety of terrestrial and marine food resources upon which many arctic peoples depend. The greatest potential for arctic environmental change, however, does not originate in the Arctic
  1 document  
Author
Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)
Source
Report prepared for the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science Program
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5880243
Keywords
Arctic
Global change
Humans
Local knowledge
Abstract
HARC research considers human activity, both within and outside the Arctic, as a link and vital driver among the terrestrial, marine, and climatic subsystems. Accordingly, the initiative provides a significant opportunity to integrate ecosystem and climate studies with a broad range of the social sciences. The major thrusts of the HARC initiative are to broaden our understanding of the arctic system and to assist arctic peoples to understand and respond to the effects of large-scale changes. HARC is also concerned with the effects of change in the arctic system on people who live outside the Arctic.
Documents

NSF_People-and-the-Arctic_A-Prospectus-for-Research-on-the-Human-Dimensions-of-the-Arctic-System-HARC_May-1997.pdf

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